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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, March 18, 1919, Image 6

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-03-18/ed-1/seq-6/

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A SENSIBLE BUNGALOW
HAVE ONE!
DON'T DREAM about a comfortable little hoirn
The man who wants an economical, stylish, and attractive home
and wishes to get the full value of his money, will select a straight
forward plan like the one above, without towers, angles or cut up
fancy work that only increase the cost. Intending builders are inr
vited to investigate our willingness and ability to help finance and
get the best building for your money.
Madison Lumber & Mill Co.
A )
Phone 23
Butte Mine Guard Murdered.
BUTTE.—Several hours of search
ing has failed to reveal to the-Butte
police any clue which frould lead to
the identity of the persons who late
Sunday night shot to death David W.
Thomas, a mine guard, returning from
work at the Tramway mine. Thomas
was found lying on the sidewalk face
down with his revolver clutched in
his hand. All the bullets in his re
volver had been discharged and resi
dents of the neighborhood state 10 to
16 shots in all were fired.
Two men were seen running -from
the vicinity immediately after the fus
illade.
Moscow Man in Los Angeles.
LOS ANGELES, Cal.—J. L. Nay
lor, of Moscow, was" a visitor at the
big exhibit of southern 'California
products maintained free to the public
in the Los Angeles chamber of com
merce. He also attended the lectures
and moving pictures that are a part
of the daily program. The exhibit is 1
the largest • of any in the country
Maintained by a commercial organic
zation. Before returning home, My.
Naylor expects to visit several of the
many other places of interest in the
Southland.
Farms Bring Fancy Prices.
Two farm land .-recently closed
set new records for prices for Idaho
farm lands. H. H. Simpson bought the
R. T. Heliand farm, three miles north
east of Moscow, for which he paid
$24,000. or $150 per acre for the 160
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ü
Safety
U
77
m
When you have a surplus of money,
deposit it with us. We allow 4 per cent
interest on savings accounts and time
deposits.
I
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of
1
The First National Bank
OF MOSCOW
Security and Service
m
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In the Spring when You
are troubled with that tired feeling
At this season of the year your liver and kidneys are apt to
'be out of kelter, your blood impure and your system in a gen
Tal run-down condition. This will cause you to suffer from a
owered vitality and loss of energy. You will probably feel
neither sick nor well. But it will pay you to see your physician
rnd find out just what is needed.
He'll likely advise the use of a good Blood Remedy or Tonic.
We handle all of the good ones.
Get something right away—
A Remedy that will build yon up.
(fß
The Comer Drug Store
Where Quality Counts
C.||E. BOLLES, Proprietor
the
zen
It,
acres, thus establishing a new high
..price record for land in that section.
The land is well improved. The oth
er sale was made by Claus Peterson,
who sold a quarter section southwest
ofi Moscow, just across the state line
in Washington, to Frank Gano for $130
per acre. This farm was also well Im
proved.
To Install Electric Oven.
Roy Pressnell, proprietor of the
Electric Babery, on Main street, has
just bought a new electric oven and
equipment at a cost of $500 which will
be installed as soon as received. This
oven has capacity for 80 loaves but it
is so arranged that other ovens may
be added when needed. Mr. Pressnell
announces that he is here to stay and
expects to enlarge his plant. He says
trade has been splendid since he open
ed the bakery and with the new equip
ment. which will be the best in this
section of thé country, he hopes to In
crease his output.
BB—
Mrs. Z. A. Revell, Raymond. Wash.,
says she süffered years from gall
stones, stomach complication and se
vere neurlalgia. After taking Dr.
Mellenthin & Co.'s treatment she is
< urqd and is very thankful as she is
working hard every day now. Dr.
Mellenthin & Co. will be in Palouse,
Hotel, Monday, March 24.
145-7
Martin
Hours. 11 a. m. to 3 p. m.
Mrs. E. J. Smithson of Colfax is
visiting a few days with her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Conner.
The
BRITISH TARS TO
DIVIDE MILLIONS
Big Prize Fund of Admiralty Re
calls W. W. Jacobs' "Many
Cargoes.
»
of the British , marshal of the ad
rnlralty apd prize court.
ODD THINGS ARE SEIZED
Naval Marshal Tells About Inroads on
Foe's Shipping During the War—
Goods Sold Bring in $70,000,
000—250 Ships Taken.
London.—When W. W. Jacobs wrote
"Many Cargoes" he had no notion his
Idea was :o be plagiarized, aud pla
giarized by a great naval war at that.
But wars—like women—have strange
ways. And not thç least strange of
them is the working of the department
In time of history It was the duty
of this highfalutlrig dignitary to ar
range for and attend the execution of
prisoners sentenced to Heath for .nur
der on the high seas. And It Is on
record that the marshal of the olden
mirai Byng ; —a Brifish Commander,
who was shot on his own qua rtérdeck,
nf ships' goods. thtt marshal told a
New York Sun reporter, amounted to
$70.000,000, but this included goods
seized under the blockade, which must
be held pending the conclusion of
peace. It was not possible to say what
the amount of the prize fund would be.
There was plenty of work for the prize
court.
time attended the' execution of Ad
as a penalty for losing a battle. Times
have changed. The modern marshal is
Only a milk and water edition of his
sterner prototype. He is the watch
man, stevedore, caretaker and guar
dian angel in chief of all German
shipping that has fallen into allied
hands during the war, and Incidentally,
of the British naval prize fund, of
which thousands of British Jack tars
and their officers are how awaiting
their share.
The "Many Cargoes" to be divided
vary from a priceless emerald to a tin
kettle.. The gross proceeds of the sale
250 Ships Seized During War.
"The president (Lord Phillimore)
has sat every day since he was ap
pointed, and there would to be
appear
quite another year's work before the
court," said the marshal. "Including
vessels seized in port upon the out
break of war, which numbered over
100, about 250 ships have gone Into
ray custody in the United Kingdom.
Comparatively speaking, quite a small
number of ships have been sold. The
majority have been requisitioned by
the government.
"Hundreds of thousands of tons of
goods of all descriptions—copper,
aluminum, metals, wool, cotton, lard,
oils and fats, coffee, cocoa, dried fruits,
wheat, barley, hides, leather, tobacco,
nitrates, zinc concentrates, diamonds,
pearls, human hair, false teeth and
many other things—all are among the
prize captures."
Producing two catalogues, the mar
shal remarked ; "From these you can
gain a good Idea of the various classes
of goods seized in the letters and par
cels malls, from precious stones to fry
ing pans, printing paper, pottery,
transfers, boots and shoes, boys' and
. men's clothes and women's undercloth
ing."
Alluding to the quantities of bonds
an<j securities. captured, he said the
Interception of these securities proved
a powerful lever In British hands,
causing serious interruption of German
trade and damage to German credit.
Amusing Incident
"An amusing Incident,
marshal, "happened In the earliest
dpys of the war, when upon a large
enemy vessel, brought in by the navy,
some alligators were found. The offi
cer of customs at the outport In ad
vising me of the seizure appeared to
be very nervous of their presence.
Some he thought were dead, because
their eyes were shut, and some were
too much alive.
"The zoological society not being
anxious to have them they were sold
to a buyer who subsequently toured
the provinces, exhibiting them aa
•prize' alligators.
"Eighteen months later the owner
appeared in the prize proceedings and
obtained a release of the proceeds of
sale only. He' appeared astonished to
And that they-had been sold. I don't
know," said the marshal, "how he
expected me to feed and look after the
animals for eighteen months. I heard
that he expressed himself very forcibly
to the Innocent purchaser."
The seized goods- have proved use
ful. In some cases stimulating British
manufacturing and trade. A museum
of- samples of the goods seized Is to be
taken round the provinces, so that
manufacturers may see the class and
style of goods the Germans were man
ufacturing and for what market, some
the goods being of excellent clan
said the
Mexican Oil Production.
Mexico City—Mexico produced Ig
18 a total of 58,156,230 barrels of
petroleum, according to official a»
nouncement, which adds that this 1»
only a fraction of the potential pro
duction of the flejda.
The daily potential production ta
estimated at 1 ,a 22,62C barrels.
Not in a Dry Town.
Detroit—You can't sell water under
guise of whisky to a thirsty cltb
In a dry town and get away wltl
ruled Judge Jeffries, In flolnj
Charles Lehman.
Paul Anders, Centralia, Wash., says
that Dr. Mellenthin & Co. treated his
11-year-old sou for tonsils and ade
noids. Since taking the treatment the
boy is cured and has gained in
strength and weight. Dr. Mellenthin
& Co. will be in Palouse, Martin Hotel,
Monday, March 24. Hours, 11 a. m.
to 3 i). m.
145-T
HARVARD FARM BUREAU
HOLDS LIVE MEETING
HARVARD.—Mr. O. S. Fletcher,
Latah county farm agent addressed
the farmers of this community at a
meeting in the hall Thursday after
noon, on the work of the county agent
during the past year, and also on the
form bureau and its work. Mr. Fletch
er dwelt at length on farm organiza
tion and the benefits derived from
cooperation, especially in marketing.
The three principal industries among
the farmers here were decided as
squirrel control, potato culture and
marketing and the livestock industry.
The farm bureau has quite a large
membership in Harvard and vicinity.
Though no efforts at organization had
been made until Thursday's meeting
when 0. B. Anderson was elected
community chairman, A. F. Hamburg
as head of the ground squirrel con
| trol proposition, H. J. Smith will head
the livestock industry and Joe Cham
1 hers the potato crop,
| Hon. H. W. Canfield, one of Latah
county's live wires at Boise during
N _ H _ Stapleton went to Palouse to
introduced to his new daughter
who arrived ^Vednesday evening,
Mrs. Stapleton is at the home of her
mother, Mrs. Harry Robertson in Pa
louse. Mother and babe reported as
doing fine.
W. J. Parker was a business visitor
in Spokane last week.
Judd and Robert Barrager who
have been ' visiting relatives and
friends here during the past two
weeks, returned Saturday to Cham
pion, Alberta.
Emil Johnson has gone to Walla
Walla where he will work during the ;
spring and summer.
The dance in the hall Friday even- I
ing was attended by a large crowd. !
All report a very enjoyable time.
Mr. and Mrs. G. N. Hornby have j
received word from their son, Lieu
(tenant Walter Hornby of the Can
1
adian army that he had arrived safe
at Calgary, Alberta and that he might
be given his discharge any day. Lieu
tenant Hornby enlisted as a private
at Calgary in the fall of 1914* and
was sent across the following spring
and has been in active service the
greater part of the time since landing
on French soil. He has been reported Î
among the wounded in action four dif- !
ferent times.
Mrs. Edna Terriault of Moscojv
visited last week at the home of her i
sister, Mrs. F. S. Smith.
N °. to
rp. Be port of the Condition of
Ihe Moscow State Bank at Moscow,
m the State of Idaho, at the close
ot business March 4th, 1919
RESOURCES
Cash
Due from banks .
Checks aud Drafts on other Banks
Other Cash Items .
Loans and Discounts . .
Overdrafts .
Stocks, Bonds and Warrants.
Banking House, Furniture and
Fixtures ...
Other Real Estate .
Other Resources .
United States Treasury Certificates
Total...
hand
$ 12,871.83
70,630.40
1,649.84
657.40
360,106.83
661.01
104,100.00
3,700.00
10 , 000.00
10 , 000.00
$574,384.64
5
2 , 814.77
7.33
LIABILITIES
Individual deposits subject to check $297,145.02
Savings Deposits . 129,092.78
Certificafes of Deposit. 97,325.75
Cashier's Checks . 9,506.32
Certified Checks .. 3,500.00
Ti
Total Deposits. .. ..
Capital Stock paid in.
Surplus .
Undivided Profits, less expenses,
interest and taxes paid.
$536,569.87
25,000.00
10 , 000.00
Tötal .
State of Idaho, County of Latah, ss:
I, Harry Whittier, Cashier of the above
named bank do Solemnly swear that the above
statement is true to the best of my knowledge
and belief.
$574,384.64
HARRY WHITTIER, Cashier.
Subscrbed and sworn to before me this 18th
day of March, 1919.
I certify that I am NOT
Director of this Bank.
Officer or
s. r. H. McGowan,
Notary Public.
Correct—Attest :
- ■ C. B. GREEN
S. L. WILLIS,
Directors.
No. 75
Report of the Condition of
The Potlatch State Bank, at Potlatch
in the State of Idaho, at the close
of business March 4, 1919
RESOURCES
Cash on hand ...
Due from banks .
Checks and Drafts
Other Cash Items
Loans and Discounts .
Overdrafts .....
Stocks, Bonds and Warrants.
Furnture and Fixtures ...
Other Real Estate .
Stock in Federal Reserve Bank...
$ 24,214.06
84,487.72
616.86
1,601.73
309,911.63
1,832.31
68,074.25
1,500.00
949.86
1,800.00
Other Banka
Total,
,$494,988.42
LIABILITIES
Individual deposits subject to check $195,323.03
Savings Deposits
Demand Certificates of Deposit.... 104,149.33
132,235.90
Total Deposits...
Capital Stock paid in
Surplus ..
Undivided
$431*708.26
50,000.00
10 , 000.00
1,280.16
2 , 000.00
Profits, less expenses,
interest and taxes paid.
Reserved for Taxes.
Total
State of Idaho, County of Latah, ss:
H. Bottjer, Cashier of the above
bank, do solemnly swear that the above
$494,988.42
najn
statement is trüe to the best of my knowledge
and belief.
J. H. BOTTJER, Cashier.
this 17th
Subscribed and sworn to before
of March, 1919.
certify that I am NOT an Officer or
Director of this Bank.

J. E, GARDNER, Notary Public.
Correct—Attest :
A. W. LAIRD
J. KENDALL,
Directors.
The Water is Fine. Come on in.
.$50.00
»r
a
Rolled Oats, per ton. .
Rolled Barley, per ton
Mill Feed, per ton.. .
Another carload of Snow Mount
and Olympic Flour on the road. Ab
solutely guaranteed to be the most
satisfactory flour ever used.
$39.00
WASHBURN & WILSON PRODUCE CO.
Near Inland Depot on a Paved Street
A ^ *♦* *^A A^ A jftfc
New
Spring
y
lo
\
it
[ ■:
0
Combine smartness with sim
plicity. Recent New York
shipments reveal the happy
charm of exquisite fabrics
used to beautiful advantage.
NOVELTY FOULARDS
COLORFUL TAFFETAS
SILK GEORGETTES
SILK TRICOLETTES
and MALLISONS SILKS
$ É
%
>
Mo.4355
Virdima Oar *,
* > ®l < 00 /
CHOICE SELECTIONS AT MODERATE
PRICES
MISS FABIS IS SHOWING MANY ATTRACTIVE HATS TO
MATCH THE NEW COATS, SUITS AND DEESSES., YISIT
THESE DEPARTMENTS.
IT WILL INTEREST YOUR PURSE.
SPECIAL—About 20 new Silk Blouses# in
flesh, white and other shades; prettily made;
all sizes. Choice
$5.00
DAVIDS
9
-
■i a 4* + < l > 4.'i a + + l i > d- + 4- + l i* + +,
+ CONTRIBUTION BOX ♦
+ + + + + + + + + + + + + * + +
Moscow, Idaho,
March 17, 1919. '
Now if
Editor Daily Star-Mirror,
Moscow, Idaho.
Dear Sir: I noticed a few days
ago a topic on the expected railway
thru Clearwater county touching
Fraser, Weippe and Peirce,
this railway could be extended and
made to pass thru Clearwater county
and to Missoula, Montana, the town
of Lewiston would be on the railway
line, the shortest distance from the
east to Portland and Seattle. I have
had occasion to be working in dif
ferent parts of Clearwater county and
have become very familiar with the
natural conditions there. I believe if
the railway was run up Fords creek
to Weippe, then up the Grasshopper,
across the divide and down the Salem
gulch to Pierce it would be there
upon the best grade. The grade thus
far would raise about 300 feet in
eighteen miles and then stay about
on a level the other fourteen. From
Pierce it would run up Rhodes creek
across and down the Oro Grande to
the north fork of the Clearwater
It would then continue up the
north fork to the mduth of Monroe
river, up the Monroe to the mouth
of the Cayuse, up the Cayuse to Loto
pass and from thence down to Lolo
hot springs. From Lolo hot springs
you have your railroad to Missoula. (
The reason I believe _ the railway j
should be situated thus is because of
the ease in getting a uniform grade j
and because it is in the heart of the
great lumber and mineral resources
of that section. Such a railway would
pierce the heart of the greatest white
pine belt. I
Such a railroad would mean some- 1
thing tremendous for Lewiston and
Moscow. As I have said before, Lew
■iston would be on the shortest cut
from the east to Portland and Se
attle. AH the products going to Spo
river.
Witter-Fishcr Co.
[2?
ra
PTPELESS furnaces
PIPELES» MOSCOW, IDAHO
Round Oak Pipeless Furnaces
Before buying see our
s
PHONE 230
' Jn transit Improved
and Moist Air Furnaces.
Show Room und get mur Prices. ,
57*1
fi]
IT
Ji
rr
r
•b
kane would pass thru Moscow. Mos
, cow would be on the line from Mis
sou la to Spokane for the railway from
Lewiston westward) would continue
! down the river thus missing Spo
! kane entirely.
j This railroad would run thru Clear
water national forest and would run
thru the greatest grazing land known.
There are there millions of acres of
burned over land from the 1910 fire
on which there is nothing growing
but the mountain grass. The Cayuse
valley alone has over a hundred
thousand acres to be grazed.
This seems to me to be quite a
project and a boon to Idaho.
Sincerely yours,
ALLEN F. SPACE,
of Weippe.
(
.
When ordering Bread from your
grocer insist on
BUTTERNUT
LOAF
Handled by All Groceries
Our Bread and Pastries are Home
Made—Like mother used to make
Eldric
Bakery
Le Roy Pressnell, Prop.

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