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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, March 28, 1919, Image 4

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-03-28/ed-1/seq-4/

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Service is more than a mere term in this bank.
When you maintain your account
here you are entitled to every service—every con
sideration—consistent with your business require
ments and prudent banking methods.
1s fundamental.
The officers of this insttitution are always glad
to discuss financial matters with you—and without
any obligation on your part.
I
FIRST
Always glad to help the Man who helps himself.
WAITRESS KILLED IN
SPOKANE JOT RIDE
BIG CAR STRIKES POLE—BOOZE
AM) SPEED GIVEN AS
CAUSES
SPOKANE.—Pauline Kvern, a Dav
enport hotel waitress, aged 20, died In
the municipal emergency hospital here
early yesterday an hour and a half aft
er she had been thrown from a speed
ing automobile when it collided with
a telephone pole. Her three compan
ions, two young men and a young
woman, are being held by the po
lice.
I
Two more persons, R. H. Cooper
and Nathan Lewis, were taken into
custody in the afternoon charged with
having had liquor in their possession
Wednesday night.
driver of the car, is held by the police
pending the outcome of the coroner's
inquest. Christ Johnson also is held
and the police said he would be charg
Murray Newton,
ed with violating the liquor law, and
Georgia Newton, who was in the auto
mobile with the Kvern girl, Newton
and Johnson, is held as a witness.
Cooper and Lewis had left the party
liefere tiie accident occurred.
"It was a case of liquor and gaso
line not mixing," said Sergeant Ho-1
gan. "The party started about 9:30
o'ciock last night at the Silver Grill,
where Johnson, Newton, Pauline
Kvern, Georgia Newton, Rosine Kvern,
the dead girl's sister, Nathan Lewis
and a Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Cooper danc
ed, and, according to their own confes
sion, each had several drinks of whis
ky. From the grill the party went to
the Cooper residence, where there was
more dancing and more whisky was
drunk.
"Leaving the Cooper home Nathan
Lewis and Rosine Kvern were dropped
at the St. Clair hotel on Howard
street, where the Kvern girls had a
room. The remaining flour started
for Hillyard, where all but the dead
girl lived."
The car, a seven-passenger Bulck,
struck a' pole on the south side of
Illinois avenue when going at a high
rate of speed, according to the police.
Miss Kvern was hurled from the ma
chine, her head striking the pavement
and then a street railway rail.
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MOSCOW, IDAHO
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STRANGE EXPLOIT OE
SDK IN BUTLES
The following from ■ a Newport
News, Virginia, daily newspaper, re
garding the 74th engineers, is of local
interest because of the fact that many
Idaho boys and several Moscow lads,
are members of the 74th:
Members of the 74th Engineers yes
terday lifted the veil of secrecy which
has shrouded that flash and sound or
ganization, unfolding a tale of scien
tific exploits on the battlefield which
reads almost like a Juies Verne story.
The flash and sound organization lo
cated enemy guns on the west irons: |
by timing the flash of the gun and
the roar as the shell lett tne weapon.
Its operations were secret and tnis is
the first time that the men have been
allowed to even mention to wiiat. or
. .. , ,
sanitation they belonged,
the tront lines, 'these souuu oeLccc
Miscrophoues were set up all along
ing machines were linked to a central
station further in the rear. The de
Sectors recorded sounds to the huu
! dredth part of a second and witn them
the American artillery was enabled to
locate hidden German batteries and
score direct hits.
The organization, just out of a
training camp in France was sta
tioned in the Toul sector when the
Germans started the great drive which
was the beginning of their deleac.
Members of the unit say the Boche
had superiority of the air and that the
American and Allied planes and bal
loons were unable to go up tolocate
many batteries,
On information furnished by the
flash and sound unit the American
artillery laid down its first barrage, a
feat that went down in history as one
of the most perfectly executed of the
war.
The flash unit of the organization
went with the American infantry all
through the Chateau Thierry drive,
locating enemy guns by calculating
ehe time the sound was heard, the
time is was seen and the speed with
which sound, light and projectiles
travel. The men were cited by the,
major general commanding the Am
ericans in the sector for their excel
lent work.
The 74th went all the way from
Chateau Thierry to Ponta Mousson.
The unit was organized at Fort de St.
Meuze in January, 1918. Company B,
Twenty-ninth Engineers had been
designated for this work, and forty
men of the 116th Engineers were
taken as a nucleus for the organiza
tion.
In France the outfit was known as
Second Battalion, Twenty-ninth En
gineers. They were dubbed the 74th
a short time before they left France
in order that they might be sent
home, some rule conflicting with their
departure, it is understood.
First Battalion, Twenty-ninth, a map
making outfit, still is in France.
Men in the 74th think the world of
nil of their officers and there is not
me of them who would not go
.hrough fire and water for them, es
pecially Major Theodore Lyman. The
major was professor of science at
Princeton University before going to
the war.
Captain C. B. Bazoone, known
among his men as the sound ranging
Wizard, also is a scientist. He was
in England on research work for the
Smithsonian Institute when he enter
ed the service.
The men in the outfit were selected
for their mathematical ability, sound
judgment and all around good quali
fies.
The
TOO SWIFT FOR
NOTED ALMANAC
March of History Causes Gotha
Publication Considerable
Trouble.
PUCES 'EX' BEFORE KAISER
Some Strange Entries in Latest Edi
tion as Result of the War—Can't
Keep Up With Affairs in Fin
land, Poiand and Ukraine.
Paris.—The swift mareh of history
which has reduced to waste-paper
value most of the existing works of
reference about European state affairs
has been too rapid for the old Al
manach de Gotha. In peace times this
compendium of statistical data con
cerning princes and potentates and
their dominions went to press about
the end of October, when its informa
tion was supposed to hold good for
another year, and it generally did,
barring some coup d'etat or other in
South America.
Now, however, its issue of 1019,
which went to the printers in Decem
ber, is affected in several important
respects®by sudden developments in
volving many of the former ruling
houses of Europe.
Amusing to students of Germany's
eastern border policy is the naive pref
atory remark that "the editors regret
that, after having prepared three new
articles on Finland, Poland and the
Ukraine, they were obliged to cancel
all three, owing to the change in the
course of events."
Two Important Changes.
In other words,- Prince Frederick
Charles of Hesse, brother-in-law of
the former German emperor, will
never seat himself upon the throne of
Finland, and there is to be no Prus
sian predominance in Poland and the
Ukraine.
The downfall of the houses of Ho
henzollern and Hapshurg has not
caused the compilers of the almanach
The prefix
"ex" is apparently held to he sufficient
to define the present status of William
II and Charles I, although the former
is still credited with his full 53 titles
and tiie latter is still styled, among
other things, "King of Jerusalem,
Prince of the Trentino and Lord of
Trieste."
much racking of brains,
Much tiie same treatment is given to
the score of German princes and
princelings who abdicated. They ap
pear in the almanach as they were—
but for the "ex."
Democratic infiltration in Germany
has set in from the top, instead of
from the bottom. For although the ad
ministrative branches of the German
government are filled with the usual
array of excellencies, professors and
councilors, yet at tiie head of that
government stand the names of Ebert,
Scheidemann, Dittman, Lundsberg and
Barth.
Nobody is supposed to care
about their Christian names.
The German national colors are still
given as black, white and red, and the
war flag still blazons the Prussian
eagle.
This
year, "provisional" govern
ments abound. There is Poland, de
scribed in the aiinanaeh as "an ancient
kingdom,"
Pllsudski.
whose "chief" is General
Finland, "formerly grand
duchy," has no president, but General
Mannerheim Is the present "regent."
Puzzle About Ukraine.
The Ukraine Is described as "a con
stitutional monarchy on a republican
basis,'' with General Skoropadskl as
hetman. A footnote, however, explains
that "according to news received De
cember 15, 1918, the hetman has ab
dicated and the power is in the hands
of a directorate consisting of Win
nitshenko, Petliura, Schweiz and An
drelevakl."
Russia, or to give it its modern
name, the "Federative Socialistic Re
public of Russian Soviets," at whose
head Lenine (Vladimir Ouiianoff) asd
Trotzky (Leon D. Bronstoin) figure, is
in a chaotic state as far as its inter
nal administration is concerned. The
almanach enumerates the eleven "more
or less independent" states into
which the empire has fallen, as fol
lows; Poland, Lithuania, Baltic
states (Conrland, Livonia, Esthonia),
Finland, Ukraine, Bessarabia (occu
pied by Roumunia), Georgia, northern
Caucasus, territory of the Don and
territory of Astrakhan, Turkestan and
Siberia.
Vanished is the pomp and panoply
of the sonorous sounding names of
the Russian aristocracy that once filled
the higher administrative posts in the
old empire. The seven members of
the "council of commissaries of the
people" are immediately followed by
the dignitaries of tiie Greek Catholic
church. If there are any excellencies
or other functionaries or officials in
present-day Russia, the almanach does
not give them.
As for the diplomatic corps at Petro
grad, ail the ambassadors and minis
ters, except one from Spain, are sig
nificantly designated as "abse-it."
One curiosity is that Albania shares
with San Marino the distinction of
having u government Indicated by
blanks.
'Twas Dog's Life.
Valparaiso, Ind.—Marriage with
Anna Katz was u dog's life, said Loon
Katz in his complaint for divorce.
There are no little kutz.
U. S. FIGHTING SHIPS
WILL FISIT PORTLAND
PORTLAND, Oregon.—With the
acceptance of an invitation by Rear
Admiral Fullam to attend the Vic
tory Rose Festival, June 11, 12 and
13, it is assured that Portland's mon
ster harbor will be the haven for a
good sized fleet of Uncle Sam's fight
ing craft while the Festival is under
way.
Recently, the directors took up the
matter of having warships in the har
bor while the Festival was being held
and the navy department indicated
that such request would be fulfilled.
Following this, an invitation
tended to Admiral Fullam at San
Diego where he commands the Pacific
division and he accepted this week.
This means that not only Admiral
Fullam will be a distinguished guest
but that he will come with his flag
ship and an escort of almost every
type of fighting craft on the Pacific
coast, including some of the sub-de
stroyers which played such a leading
part in putting to a quick death the
activities of the murderous German
submarines in the Great War.
Coupled with the announcement
that Portland will offer a rare naval
pageant is the news that it is ex
tremely probable that a race between
airplanes, either from Los Angeles
or from Mather Field, Sacramento,
will terminate here on the
was ex
opening
day of the festival with a series of
amazing demonstrations of airplanes
in war maneuvers, the first air meet
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Haw glad he is
to get back—how
glad you are to have
him. Home never
was so "sweet," never
did it mean so much.
yovUWsurely be interested in knowing
Calumet Baking Powder. It was selected for Army
and Navy use by experts who provided so well for your
"boy's" welfare. Use it for the "boy's'*bakings at home.
Without any exception
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CALUMET
BAKING POWDER
*9
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is the highest grade of baking powder in the world. Its
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remove all possibility of baking failure, baking waste
and guarantee the finest—tenderest—most wholesome .
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Calumet is the most economical
of all baking powders. You save
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price. You save when you use it
—has twice the usual leavening
strength. You save ingredients
it is used with— no waste.
Sold by your grocer—
under a guarantee of
money back if not all
and more than we claim.
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Spedal-lKlIl ON CANDIES
We are going to sell within the next week the Candy which we
have' on hand at Reduced Prices.
We have on hand a fine assortment of Box Candies ranging from
$36c to $3.00 per box, which we will sell at a Big Reduction.
A large assortment of Chocolates, Mixed and Bar Candies of
which all must go.
We are getting ready for our New Easter Line which will arrive
-Watch Our Window for Extra Specials.
soon
Plummer's Cafeteria
AND CONFECTIONERY
to be staged in the Northwest, the
center of the entire spruce output by
which the air division of the allied
nations were supplied with the essen
tial materials for construction.
Villa Unbidden Dance Guest.
JAUREZ, Mex., March 28.—Fran
cisco Villa was the unbidden guest at
a Mexican dance held at Rancho San
Diego, south of the border, during
his recent foray into the border
country. The band was playing a
typical Mexican waltz, the rancheros
and their senoritas were swaying in
time to the music. There was a
clatter of silver spurs as a high hat
ted figure loomed in the doorway.
Recognizing the much-feared "Pan
cho" the dancers fled from the room.
They were ordered back by Villa who
joined in the dancing with his staff
and continued enjoying the pastime
until breakfast. Then he and his
"Golden Ones" rode away without
harming anyone.
Read The Daily Star-Mir
ror Want Ads.

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