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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, April 14, 1919, Image 2

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The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
Published every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of the City
_ of Moscow. _
Entered as second-class matter Oct.
IS, 1911, at the postoffice of Moscow,
Waho, under the Act of Congress of
March, .1879.__
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Delivered by carrier to any part of
the city:
Per Month. .
Three Months
E ix Months .
ne Year ...
50c
$1.60
2.76
5.00
.9
By Mail
^ tside of city and on rural routes):
Month.40c
$1.16
Three Months
«X Months .
•ne Year ...
2.25
4.00
Thr (Weêkly) Idaho Post:
$1.60
Ter Year
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
titled to the use for republication
9t ell news-dispatches credited to it
WÊ not otherwise credited in this paper
•Bd also the local news published
•min.
'All rights of republication of
herein alfeo
ed.
TARDY RETRIBUTION.
John I. Metcalf was arrested in
Spokane recently and lodged in jail
te answer a charge of disloyalty.. He
was caught with a suit case filled
with bolshevist literature, some of it
actually trasonable. He is being
held for trial.
I
> The arrest of Metcalf brings to
memory » aad affair in which he
' - *was 'the principal actor more than
25 years ago. Metcalf was a mem
ber of the legislature of the state of
United States
Washington when
senators were elected by the legis
There was a hot contest on
lature.
for United States senator with Wat
son C. Squires, of Seattle, a million
aire, and Judge Calkins, of Tacoma,
a poor man of great ability and who
would have been a shining light in
the senate, as the opposing candi
dates. Old timers will remember the
bitterness of the fights between Se
attle and Tacoma, which were nearer
the same size and importance then
than now.
The vote was being take® in the
legislature and when Metcalf's name
called he arose in his seat hold
was
ing $600 in crisp new bills, which he
said had been paid to him to vote
for Calkins, and he walked forward
and laid the money on the speaker's
desk and posing as a "paragon of
virtue" tried to make a speech tellipg
how he ancl several others had been
bribed by Judge Calkins, the poor
man, to vote for him and against
Squires, the Seattle millionaire.
-> Metcalf never finished that speech.
Members of the legislature were for
tearing him to pieces and it took sev
eral policemen to escort him to his
boarding house,
been done. Spuires was elected and
Judge Calkins soon died of a broken
"heart. He took sick soon after the
episode and never recovered. An in
vestigation by the legislature follow
ed and the story was shown to be a
fake gotten up for the purpose of de
feating Judge Calkins, who seemed
to be in the lead. Metcalf was ex
pelled from the legislature in dis
grace and he disappeared from view
for many years. Later he bobbed up
and again regained some prominence
in politics and was haled .before the
court for violation of one
He was constantly in
But the evil had
supreme
of its orders,
trouble ancj sunk to the level of a
bolshevist and is now working with
and the bolshevik ele
It is to be hoped that he will
ment.
be convicted and given a long term
He has already
in a federal prison,
done too much mischief to be per
mitted to continue at large. It is to
hoped that retribution, which
seems to have been slow in his case,
be
has at last overtaken him.
te (ss te
Congressman Longworth and Con
gressman Mann may continue to call
each other "reactionary" with every
assurance that the people will believe
them both.—Enterprise (Ore) Record
Chieftain.
te te ra
"What shameful
The kaiser said,
fears
I'm now compelled to feel;
I stacked the cards for thirty years
And then mussed up the deal."
—Washington Star.
te te te
It is said the former kaiser looks
old and broken. A living image of
some sections of Belgium, as it were.
—Detroit Free Press.
The German fleet is now giving
the Allies more trouble than it ever
did when it had the run of the Kiel
Canal.—Rome Sentinel.
Anyway, Heinie, you will find an
indemnity about as cheaep as a kais
er.—Greenville (S. C.) Piedmont.
It's funny with what unction Re
publican objectors to a league of na
tions quote a democrat who seems to
share their opposition, when they re
ject the views of a democratic ma
jority which favors and supports the
proposal.—Kootenai Valley Times.
What puzzles the Joplin News
Herald about the political situation
in Germany is that the lower class
has declared a dictatorship in Ba
The News-Herald would like
varia.
to know if it is possible that there
is a lower class than the one in power.
"What shall we do with our tanks?"
writes a British military expert. The
United States will have the same
problem to face after July, when this
country goes dry.—Rochester Herald,
te te te
Anyway, it silenced a lot of this
talk in America about the superiority
of the dear Fatherland.—Greenville
(S. C.) Piedmont.
Something alse than trouble will be
brewed just over the Mexican border
when the bone-dry order goes into
effect.—Chicago Daily News.
We would feel better if we could
hear Heinie's yell when he sees the
price-tag on his first tenderloin steak.
—Greenville (S. C.) Piedmont.
!
A year ago we had one war in
Europe; today we have six.—Venan
go Herald.
te tas P*;
There is nothing humanitarian
about feeding Germany if she has to
pay the prices the rest of us pay.—
Greenville (S. C.) Piedmont.
* RT, lb
Reed says the League plan will
grant to five men more arbitrary
power than was ever possest by a
despot. Mr. Reed, meet Mr. Burle
son.—Greenville (S.C.) Piedmont.
THE TROPHY TRAIN
AROUSES INTEREST
SOUTHERN IDAHO GREETS CAP
TURED TROPHIES WITH GREAT
ENTHUSIASM
SHOSHONE, Idaho.—(Special to
The Star-Mirror.)—Thousands of citi
zens of southern Idaho gathered at
trophy special touring the state for
the Victory loan. A strong spring
wind didn't keep the people from
turning out to welcome the train and
examine the giant cannons, tanks, gas
bombs and other engines of destruc
tion used in the great world war.
State Chairman Gwinn declared last
night when the day's work for the
party with the train was finished and
which was close to midnight at Sho
shone, that the spirit* shown by the
crowds in the southern Idaho towns
made him hopeful that Idaho would
be one the first states to report its
quota paid. "The people are behind
this Vcitory loan," Chairman Gwinn
said. "You can't tell me that the
thousands who gathered to see these
war relics and to listen so intently to
the speakers are not heart and soul
and poeketbook behind the govern
ment to the finish. I am expecting
Idaho to go across neck and neck with |
the first states in the Union if not ■
actually the first."
Gov. D. W. Davis was with the |
-train yesterday and will remain with :
it the entire week. He spoke at ev
ery station on Sunday's schedule, ■
which included Kuna, Mountain !
Home, Summett; Glenns Ferry, King |
Hill, Bliss, Gooding and Shoshone. j
Today the train is covering the j
Hailey and Hill City branches of the
O. S. L. Captain Edgar T. Haley, !
recently returned from overseas J
ere he served in the aviation, was j
icer of the day on the special yes- |
terday, and had charge of the ar
rangements, introducing the speakers |
and making out the program for en- |
tertainment, which are adapted to ;
each town according to the length of |
time allotted the train therein.
the stations between and including
Kuna and Shoshone yesterday to
view the war relies carried on the
3
im
lŒQ
«i*
7*
¥
ill
Varnished Surfaces Make House
work Easy
When your floors begin to look shabby, and the worn
spots show up on the steps, your work of keeping them
clean is almost doubled. Your housework will be made
much easier if you have them refinished with
ACME QUALITY
VARNOTILE (FLOOR VARNISH)
made especially for floors. It wears well, does not scratch
or mar white, and is the ideal finish for floors, steps, hall
ways, and interior woodwork of all kinds.
There is a special Acme Quality Varnish for every sur
Tell us what surface needs varnishing, and we will
getting the material that will give you the
face,
assure your
best results.
COLLINS & ORLAND HARDWARE CO.
MOSCOW, IDAHO
Local speakers yesterday were Will
H. Gibson, at Mountain Home; H. H.
McMasters, O. S. L. agent at Glenn's
Ferry; Mayor John Thomas, a prom-I
inent banker of Gooding and Lincoln
counties, at Gooding. Mr. Thomas
pledged the support of the banks of
Gooding county to the Victory loan.
"We are not wanting to make a cent
profit on the Victory loan," he de
dared. 'Our banks Will S^Y 6 the
people all the credit they "ask for the
purchase of these bonds, and will
carry them as long as they tell us
they need th be carried. All we ask
the people of Gooding county to do is
to come in and make their subscrip
tions and we will guarantee to see
them through."
Private Bert Bates, in the artillery
service, and who saw action on five
different fronts in France, is the ver
satile entertainer of the bunch with
the special. Mr. Bates vividly pictures
battle scenes and incidents and holds
the crowds in close attention.
Owing to a cold, driving wind a
meeting was held in the Bauch the
atre at , Shoshone last night instead
of in the open air at the train, as is
the custom. The theatre was jammed
with people who braved the storm to
view the war trophies and hear the
speakers.
Governor Davis, Chairman Gwinn,
Private Bates and G. J. White, county |
chairman of the Victory loan drive in .
Lincoln county, were the speakers,
Captain Hawley presiding. When Mr. 1
' would
pledge themselves to back up the Vic
tory loan, to go on record by raising
their hands, the response was prac
tically unanimous.
Sergeant Mark Shields is with the
train, organizing nd startin
zations of the World
which includes all soldiers, sailors and
marines of the great world war. Ev
ery returned service man who pos
sibly can is urged to be at the train
when the special makes his home
town, if it is on the schedule of the
Idaho tour, in order to get in touch
with this organization.
Train Here April 21st.
The trophy train will be in Moscow
Monday evening, April 21, arriving
at 7:30 and leaving at 9:30. The two
hours spent in Moscow ought to be
long enough to permit all to go
through the train and see thé tro
phies and hear t$ie speeches,
train will be sidetracked on the east
side of the Northern Pacific depot.
Judge W. F. Morgareidge, postmaster
of Moscow, who is county chairman of
the Victory loan drive, has been asked
to secure some local speakers and a
band for the visit of the train to Mos
cow. The train leaves here at 9:30
g organi
Veterans,
War
The
and makes no other stop in Latah
county, so if is expected that there
will be many people from other towns
here to view the trophies and hear
the addresses.
_
GET BIG BOUNTY FOR
EDGEMONT, S. D.—(Correspond
e nce of the Associated Press.)—A
K he-wolf. which has dope heavy dam
age in this district, has at last been
m
KILLING SHE WOLF
LATE!
'Too Late"—
Sad words these
for they always emphasize
what MIGHT have been and
SHOULD have been but WAS
not. GET RIGHT WITH GOD ,
B4 IT IS TOO LATE.
ETERNITY! ETERNITY!
Where will you spend it?
Hear the ex-soldier boy evan
gelist tonight and every night
this month at
EGGAN'S HALL—8:00 P. M.
exterminated. The fight was to
finish. The wolf's family of eight
'perished with her.
The wo i f had been operating in the
I Antelope Flat region and several men,
employed by an oil company, had had
i experiences with the savage animal,
1 w hlch took desperate chances to ob
ta j n food for her
1 who had suffered, offered _
bounties to swell the state reward,
i „ ,
Recently the animal was seen on a
I snowswept plain and tracked to her
, Ialr f After a trench, 10 feet long and
alx f * et was du S> th ? ani ™al and
£er brood were cornered and killed,
T t he bounties netted the hunting party
of several men about $35 each.
ror \A/ an f Ad«

_
pups. Cattle men.
reward
Read The Daily Star-Mir
npi * j m j
I
I
'WHERE EVERYBODY GOES"
* ÜU «J <U|U 1 UCOUflJ
2-7-9
THE BEAUTIFUL PLAY
in 8 Acts
R
A
M
o
N
A
This picture received the highest
praise ever given to a production by
the National Board of Censors.
BARGAIN PRICES
-ANY SEAT—
25c
25c
HEADQUARTERS FOR NO. 1
HARNESS
OILING AND REPAIRING
HARNESS
Full line of TRUNKS and
SUIT CASES
go to
J. N, FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance. Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerholz, Prop.
Moscow. Idaho.
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Loans
MAKER OF CLOTHES FOR THE
MAN AVHO KNOWS
Order Now
O. H. SGHWARZ
TAILOR
Hello! Is this Kitley's Market?
Send up a steak as nice as the
last one. Good-bye.
THIRD STREET
MARKET
WANTED—500 STOCK
CATTLE
PHONE 248
L. M. KITLEY
a
:c
J
Hotel Moscow
TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
Thoroughly Modern
.. FIRST CLASS GRILL
V AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS
Monuments
GEO. H. MOODY,
Moscow, Idaho
wishes to announce to those
who are going to have monu
ments erected before Decora
Day
To place their orders as early
as convenient in order to get
their work and avoid any de
lay. My stock of monuments is
very complete at this time and
at the most reasonable prices.
We also carve U. S. Service
Emblems for soldiers. Would
invite you to call at my store
and select the work you wish
to purchase.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
DR. JOHN W. STEVENSON—Eye
Ear, Nose and Throat. Glasses
Fitted. Office, New Creighton Bldg.,
corner Third and Main. Phone 177.
DR. F. M. LEITCH—Physician, Com
mercial Bldg. Phone 223Y.
DR. W. À. ADAIR
Creighton, Blk. Phone 86.
Physician,
OSTEOPATH
DR. W. M. HATFIELD—Osteopath,
Creighton Bide. Phone 48.
DR, ZONA BIGGS—Chiropractic, Steele
Bldg. Phone 331H,
DENTISTS
DR. J. A, McDANIBL, Dentist, First
Nat'ljßank- Bldg. Phone 229,j
LAWYERS
MORGAN & BOOM—Attorneys, Ur
quhart Bldg. Phone 75.
A. H. OVERSMITH —Atttorney-at
Law, Urquhart Bldg. Phone 208.
Attorneys-at-Law,
First Natl. Bank Bldg. Phones Or
land 104. Lee 104L.
ORLAND & LEE
GUY W. WOLFE—Attorney. 112,E.
2nd. Phone 17 Y .
JOHN NISBET—Attorney-at-law, 1st
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phone 131J.
IMPROVEMENT PARLOR
MARIE SHANNON. Rooms 18 and
19 TTrouhart RlHtr Phone 1221
Shampooing massfge and manieur
anampoomg, g d manieur
TAXI CAB
FOR THE BEST TAXI SERVICE—
Phone 300.
NEELY & SON — PHONE
at the old prices
51
ARCHITECTS
C. RICHARDSON, ARCHITECT—
Skattaboe Blk., phone 200.
:
FLORISTS
SCOTT BROS — Proprietors, North
Main. Phone 289.
Woodworking and Cabinet-Maker
H. O, FIELD—Ph. 122L. 107 S. Wash.
VETERINARY
DR. E. T. BAKER. VETERINARIAN,
Sixth and Washington. Phone 243.
DR. J. D. ADAMS—Veterinarian. Dr.
J. S. Thompson in charge. Phone
121-L.
AUCTIONEER
CHAS. E. WALKS—Auctioneer, Urqu
hart BIgd. Phone 278.
AUCTIONEER
J. F. BIEHL—Satisfaction guaran
teed or no pay. Phone 338. Ad
dress 310 S. Lilly.
CREAMERY
MOSCOW CREAMERY—62 cents
paid for butter fat. Ice cream, bulk
and brick in cold storage.
DRAY LINES
MOSCOW TRANSFER CO.—Craig
and Metlock. Agents Continental
Oil Company. Phone 19R.
»AINTING, KALSOMINING, PAPER
HANGING AND SIGNS
PHONE 34-J.
CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP WANTED—Female
WANTED—A GIRL OR WOMAN FOP
general housework. Call Farmers
9049. Mrs Lenard Brown.
162tf
IT WILL PAY YOU TO CALL 137-J
and get our prices on Paperhang
ing and Painting, and Kalsomining.
We are prepared to give you the
lowest possible prices and best of
service. All estimates free. Phone
137-J
Read The Daily Star-Mirror "Want
Ads."
FOR RENT—Rooms
FOR RENT—TWO VERY PLEASANT
furnished rooms. Can be used for
light housekeeping. 210 First street.
164tf
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms. Private
Rath. Phone 9006.
123tf
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments. Phone 206H.
231-tf
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT — MODERN COTTAGE,
166-0
good location. Phone 317J.
SEMI-MODERN 5-ROOM HOUSE,
acre of ground, 5 blocks from Main
street. Phone 121R.
164-9
FOR RENT—8 ROOM MODERN
house with 1 acre of ground. Phone
269Z.
106-*f
FOR RENT.—AN EIGHT RQOM
modern house, on Deakin Ave., east
of dormitory. Phone 170J.
83 -if
FOR SALE—Real Estate
LAND FOR RENT OR SALE—SEVEN
acre tract with good improvements,
aboundance of good water, land ih
highest state of cultivation.
N. Williamson.
Apply
I68tf
FOR SALE—A FOUR-ROOM HOU$J£
with gbod concrete cellar under
the house and four lots and a good
barn, chicken house and chicken yard,
good well on the place; also four cords
of wood. This is a real snap at $850.
One-half cash and time on the bal
ance. You had better see this. 724
Kenneth Ave., Moscow, Idaho.
166-2
FOR SALE—600 ACRES, 3 MILES
from Leland, Idaho, 55 acres in cul
tivation and more can be; 6-room
bouse and large barn, machine shed,
chicken and hog house, store house,
water piped to house and barn yard.
Plenty water in pasture; 20 acres hog
tight; orchard and berry patch. Price
$15 per acre, half down, balance to
suit purchaser. No trade. Postoffice
Box 47, Leland, Idaho.
158-70
FOR SALE—Live Stock
FOR SALE—FULL BLOOD SHORT
horn bull; color, red.
filly registered,
count of color. '
Fully guaranteed.
Good strain.
Selling only on ac
At a big bargain.
See Williamson.
168tf
WILLIAMSON HAS SEVERAL GOOD
young work horses for sale. See
him. _ I68tf
i FOR SALE — A JERSEY HEIFER
calf. C. H. Whitmore. Phone 166R.
168-0
!
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE CHEAP—A GOOD MON
itor shoe drill with grass seeder,
ready to go in field. Call 912X4.
___167-173
FOR SALE—AN EDISON PHONO
graph. 105 records. Call 312J.
168-2
FOR. SALE—A GIRL'S BICYCLE.
Will sell cheap. Inquire at the
Star-Mirror office, or phone 183W.
_167-tf
FOR SALE—FIVE PASSENGER CAR,
electric lights and starter, in good
A. J.
167-3
running order. A bargain.
Draper. Phone 44R.
r. d p «at it .a porm poppur atvf),
bAlj E—A CORN POPPER AND
" eanl,t roaeter ' chea P- at the Bi -
| Be nd store . 219 West 3d St. 166-0
j FOR SALE—NETTED GEM
; potatoes. Phone 91 3x1.
SEED
161-73
FOR SALE— S. C. W. L. SETTING
eggs. $1.00 per setting. Call 152Y
166-167
or 287R.
FOR SALE CHEAP—A CHINA
firing kiln. Can be seen at Mrs.
C. A. Watkins, 402 So. Van" Buren
St. Phone 276N.
164-tf
FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN—
Large barn. Inquire 402 So. Van
Buren. Phone 276N. 164-tf
163-9
for sale. Phone 927x3.
tOfLil_ Star-Mirror. _
I F0R SALE OR TRADE FOR TOWN
property—117 acres 3 miles from
Juliaetta. I. - G. Williamson, Phone
108H__ 148-tf
j FOR SALE—ALASKA PEAS, 7c LB.
Phone 45 or 82R. _ 148-tf
WHITE EYED MARROWFAT SEED
Phone 45 or 82R.
_ 138tf
peas for sale.
E. J. Armbrusten
FOR SALE—A SCHUMANN PIANO
in good condition. Will sell cheap.
Phone 279.
102-tf
MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED—NO. 1 WHITE POTATOES,
also Russetts and Netted Gems.
Write or phone us what you have. We
will pay highest cash prices. Gar
field Fruit & Produce Co. Garfield,
Wash.
166-9
WANTED—A FRESH MILCH COW.
121-tf
Call phone Farmers 9119.
ANYONE WANTING WELL DRILL
ing done write or phoné W. L. Todd,
Troy, Idaho.
150-172
FORDS RUN 34 MILES PER GAL
lon with our 1919 carbureters. Use
cheapest gasoline or half kerosene.
Start easy any weather. Increased
power. Styles for all motors. Runs
slow high gear. Attach yourself.
Big profits for agents. Money back
guarantee. 30 days trial. Air-Fric
tion Carburetor Go. 1429 Madison St.
167
Dayton, Ohio.
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND—A LADY'S GLOVE,
street, Saturday. Owner can have
same by calling at Star-Mirror and
paying for this ad.
ON
168tf
LOST—AN AUTOMOBILE JACK ON
cemetery road, Sunday. Leave at The
167-8
Star-Mirror. .

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