OCR Interpretation


The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, April 14, 1919, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-04-14/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE THREE

TO TUNNEL CHANNEL
Will Take Five Years and Cost
$ 100 , 000 , 000 .
Engineers Also Considering Boring
% Under Bosphorus and Strait
of Gibraltar.
London—Five years would be re
quired to complete the proposed tun
nel under the English channel from
England to France, according to an
authoritative estimate. It is said that
In ordinary times the cost of the
work would be about $80,000,000, but
in view of the Increased cost of labor
and materials, the expense Involved
would, under present conditions, be
nearly $100,000,000.
The Dally Mail claims to have defi
nite Information that the British and
French governments have agreed to
the construction of the tunnel, and
that the details now are being dis
cussed by. a special commission In
Paris, which also Is considering the
building of tunnels under the Bos
phorus and the Strait of Gibraltar.
The engineering plans for the chan
nel, according to the Daily Mall,
are so far advanced that work could
be begun immediately.
"It Is proposed," says the Daily
Mall,
to start the tunnel some dis
tance Inside both countries Instead of
near the coast as was originally In
tended, so as to avoid the risks of a
fall of the cliffs, such as already has
occurred on the British side near the
point where the work would have been
begun.
addition to tracks, the tunnel
will carry telephone and telegraph
wires, superseding the present sea-bed
cables, and als» pneumatic tubes for
carrying letters and parcels.
French and British railroads
cemed are willing to finance the
scheme, but the two governments wish
to exercise control of some sort of
Joint state finance.
The
con
MRS. LLOYD GEORGE
%
•V'
ÉS;
ï; ;
m
>-x
\
-
■s
y /:. :
m
&
mm
m
wm
Hivl
mm
;;S>
I
i;

11
s
I
:
m
M
I
'■I
11
i
r J
_ ^Photoby
Ntwpaper Union!
Id
Latest photograph to reach this
country of Mrs. Lloyd George, wife
of the British premier.
NOW PLAN EMPLOYMENT FLAG
Clevelanders Begin Movement in Be*
half of the Returned
Idle Soldiers.
Cleveland, O.—A movement has been
stalled among employment managers
for adoption of a uniform soldier em
ployment flag showing the number of
men reinstated in their positions. The
managers have asked their national as
sociation to Indorse the movement,
which Is expected to encourage em
ployment of soldiers.
Several large concerns have worked
but their own Bag designs, while oth
ers are awaiting adoption of a uniform
emblem.
"Cleveland now is a poor place for
an f<n raider to com e seeking work,"
said a member of the chamber of com
merce committee investigating unem
ployment: here. O. F. Arndt, United
States employment commissioner, said
possibly half of the soldiers unable to
find work here were not employed In
Cleveland before entering military
service.
Estimates of unemployment here
run from 20,000 to 70,000. Cleveland
manufacturers are reported to be try
ing to lower the production cokt
through labor saving machinery and
other means rather than by a reduc
tion of wages.
Picked Wrong Street.
Kansas City, Mo.—Earl Cadgue, To
peka Indian, got on the warpath. In
court he admitted saying he could
"lick anybody on Main street." "Picked
too long a street," commented the
Judge, assessing $20.
flavor
in
Post
Toasties
The best
corn flakes
you ever
saw
& G* K
*T» (J
r
IE
Sxpagfoig £a.g-ai IH&L&p
CONTINOUS BATTLE SECRET OF
ALLIED SUCCESS—HUN
RESERVES EXAUSTED
Marshal Sir
Douglas Haig, in his final dispatch,
now made public, presents an import
ant review of the war and describes
in detail" the expansion and achieve
ments of the British army, with many
remarkable facts and figures. He
treats the operations on the western
front as a single continuous campaign
in which can be recognized the same
general features and necessary stages
that between forces of aimrmrimatp
mat, oetween lorces ot approximate
ly equal strength, have marked all the
conclusive battles of history. •
"The high water mark of our fio-hf
me nign water marK ot our light
mg strength m mfantry)"says the
British commander "was nnlv rpnph
oritisn commanaer, was only reach
ed after two and a half of
LONDON.—Field
flict, by which time heavy casualties
had already been incurred. It was
not until midsummer, 1916, that the
artillery situation became even ap
proximately adequate to the conduct
of major operations.
Gun Situation Is Watched.
"During the Somme battle artillery
ammunition had to be watched with
the greatest care. During 1917 am
munition was plentiful, but the gun
situation caused anxiety. It was only
in 1918 that àrtillery operations could
be conducted without any limiting
consideration beyond that of trans
port.
"The margin with which the Ger
man onrush of 1914 was stemmed was
so narrow and the subsequent strug
gle was so severe that the word 'mi
raculous' is hardly too strong a term
to describe the recovery and ultimate
victory of the allies.
"The breakdown of Russia in 1917
probably prolonged the war by a year
and the military situation in Italy in
the autumn of 1917 necessitated the
transfer of five British divisions to
Mark a cross (X) in the square to right of name of the person for whom you wish to vote.
INDEPENDENT TICKET
CITIZENS' TICKET
j
For Mayor
For Mayor
For Mayor
WARREN TRUITT



For City Clerk and ex-officio Po
lice Judge
For City Clerk and ex-officio Po
lice Judge
For City Clerk and ex-officio Po
lice Judge
J.' R. STRONG*



(Vote for Two for each Ward)
(Vote for Two for each Ward)
FOR COUNCILMEN
(Vote for Two for each Ward)
FOR COUNCILMEN
FOR COUNCILMEN
FIRST WARD
FIRST WARD
FIRST WARD
B
B
I. R. BOYD
GEO. E. HORTON
SECOND WARD
SECOND WARD
SECOND WARD
B
B
B
G. S. RICHARDSON
W. H. CONNER
THIRD WARD
THIRD WARD
THIRD WARD
B
B
B
CARL SMITH
M. M. PRESTON
JOHN T. BAKEN
Italy at a time when their presence in
France might have had far-reaching
"
effect.
German Reserves Exhausted.
Sir Douglas records the interesting
fact that more than half the British
casualties in the fighting in 1918 oc
curred during the five months from
March to July, when the allies were
on the defensive
"The rapid collapse of Germany's
military power in the latter half of
1918," he says, "was the logical out
come of the fighting of the previous
two years. It would not have taken
place but for that period of ceaseless
attrition which used up the German
reserves. It is in the great battles of
1916 and '17 that all have to seek for
the secret of our victory in 1918."
The valu? of cavalry in modern war
is emphasized by Sir Douglas, and In
discussing the value of mechanical
contrivances, such as tanks, he ob
serves that immense as their influ
serves tnat, immense as meir miiu
ence might have been, they could not
by themselves decide a campaign,
Their true role is to assist infantrv
true roie is w assist miantry
men, by whose rifles and bayonets
can decisive victory ^e won
tan decisive victory e won.
Cavalry Held Important.
Sir Douglas says that the feature of
the war which to the historian may
well appear most noteworthy is the
creation of the new British army,
; which was successfully built up in the .
very midst of war. ;
"The total of more than 327,000
German prisoners captured by us on ,
the western front," says Sir Douglas,
"is in striking contrast to the force of j
six divisions, comprising some 80,
fighting men, with which we entered
the war. ' |
Sir Douglas Haig contends that the
decision to preserve the cavalry j
corps has been completely justified. j
The field marshal devotes a special '
section to "why we attacked when- I
ever possible," in which he says:
"The object of all war is victory
and a purely defensive attitude can
never bring about a successful deci
sion."
Creeling Spreads.
If allegations made by Senator
Chamberlain are true that the frank- j
ing privilege delegated to government
' departments has been used for the
purpose of giving publicity to a de
fense of the courtmartial system by
Col. John H. Wigmore, not now offi
Cially connected with any department
and whose letter was purely private,
I on a professional phase of the issue,
j the administration itself is interested
j in clearing up this obvious misuse of
I that privilege.
During the war the people
j markably patient under the extension
I of George Creel's bureau of informa
! tion methods, whereby were circulated
, tons of valueless matter containing
nine-tenths political propaganda for
the administration and the other tenth
constituting a few facts drawn out to
remarkable thinness. But the con
tinuance of a federal publicity bureau
designed for the defense or
flaging of the administration
were re
camou
or any
: of its departments constitutes an evil
which the public will hardly tolerate
when the system means an increasing
source of expense.
The postal system at present, as
conducted by Mr. Burleson, is not self
sustaining nor as efficient as the
years of development should warrant.
; Abuse of franking privileges by
j Washington officialdom means in
I crease of expense and enlargement of
1 the volume of business which further
I obstructs attainment of efficiency in
handling the ordinary and necessary
I functions of the system. And the
j main point is that propagandist bu
I reaus at public expense contain
I elemént foreign to American ideas of
I government.—Boise Statesman.
an
Where Ignorance is Bliss.
"Big Bill" Haywood, I. W. W. lead
! er, sends out a plaintive wail from the
I federal penitentiary at Leavenworth
j to the effect that ignorance and gross
I misunderstanding of the priinciples of
his organization have combined to aid
j in persecuting him and his followers.
Big Bill denounces Gompers and the
I American Federation of Labor for cir
culating propaganda against him
I which, he claims finally wrenched
from the bosom of his family
anc D - om his position of a good citi
zen and put him behind the bars.
Haywood has already made plans,
in the event of his release from
. , .
P r *son, to conduct a campaign of ed
uca tion J designed to bring about the
recognition of the I. W. W. as a
W01 'thy organization. In giving his
1 creec * Haywood advocates the use of
t° level ail classes of society,
He believes the ditch digger is as es
sential to the wellbeing of mankind
as is a physician—that the former is
entitled to the same remuneration as
, ... ... ... . . .
the latter, although the physician
m ust devote years of time and spend
]® uc ,.. rn l on f. y on bls education, while
y 16 . ditch digger requires little or no
, training.
. Haywood says his definition of sa
potage does not mean throwing mon
pey wrenches in machinery, burning
farmers wheat stacks and such acts
of violence, but he does not make
i w w the I W W sahotae-e nrn
" what the L ^ sa botage pro
gram cans tor in tne way ot violence.
Bl £ Blll > who has been a guest in
conntrv is
an «est jaus in tne country, is
unstinted in his praise of the Leaven
worth bastiie Whv disturb him if he
> vortn nasine. vvny oisturo nim n ne
so well situated . The country may
with piofit lemam in ignorance of his
teachings. Boise ^Statesman.
t T~Tr r
ldaa ® In "" str Keview.
KELLOGG. By acceptane of the
reduced scale of wages in the Coeur
d Alenes, organized labor has shown
commendable spirit and gone-far to
remove the impression that it is con
çerned merely with its own selfish
interests without regard to economics
®r . e laws of supply and demand.
During war times, employers have
been liberal and it is only right that
now the industry is passing through
dark days labor and capital should
pull together until the sea of business
becomes calmer. Labor has shown
a disposition to meet the demands of
readjustment in a fair manner and
we believe that employers, judging
from the past, may be depended upon
to do their share. All classes must
submit to the new order of things,
but the burden should be equitably
distributed.
Caldwell.—Silo construction in the
r
Borrow From Us
No so very long ago, the banker merely loaned
money.
Today he is loaning judgment and experience in
addition, and without cost.
The modem banker anticipates the needs of his
customers in obtaining information and statistics
relative to business which may develop his com
munity.
Feel free to consult our officers about your finan
cial affairs.
m
«
Ü
The First National Bank
OF MOSCOW
i
Security and Service
pets. Valley - eceives considerable im -
Grazing fees on timber lands fixed at
20 cents per head for sheep and 80
cents per head for cattle.
Salmon.—Rock work progressing
rapidly on state highway south of
here.
Wallace.—-Lucky Swede Gold and
Copper Mining Co. to resume work
soon. Utah-Idaho Yellowstone high
way is being pushed rapidly.
According to annual report of Heo
la Mining Co., which was distributed
last week, new records were estab
lished during 1918, the output having
been over 7000 tons greater than in
min
1917.
BOISE.—Total gross value of
eral protued of state for 1918, $37'
3|0.000 as against $56,292,000 for
WALLACE.—Nabob
_ ...
... . . Consolidated!
Mining Co. sawing lumber for con
centrating mill that will be construct
ed this spring.
.
associated with E C Hall in the
. . ™ * . £ . U HaU m lne
Auto Electric Supply company on
Thjrd street Mr Williams and Mr .
formerly nartners invine
rtal Iorm erly partners having
worked together for years. Both are
. , .. . .. partition
* , 4
of Mr - Williams to the force means in
. caoacitv to turn ont first dasn
wQrk h t notice
' •
___ "
f, em Hunt Se,,s Land * |
C i em Hunt, who recently returned ,
from a trip to Enterprise, Oregon, go-I
; n g by train and returning on horse
back. with some horses purchased
there, is in town today on business.
M r. Hunt has sold his 20-acre tract
at the foot of Moscow Mountain and
wilI move to Ilniontown and engage
j n W ork on the Washington state high
way between Uniontown and Lewis
ton
ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO.
HAS NEW PARTNER
H. A. Williams, of Ely, Nevada,
rived in Moscow'recently and will be
ar
This will be separate ticket to be voted oii at the same time.
For Trial City Manager, One Year.
Against Trial City Manager, One Year.
j Read The Daily Star-Mir
ror Want Ads.
♦ + ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
♦ MARKETS

!****♦*•♦♦♦♦♦-♦♦♦♦
! V *" e .dealer and are changed daily,
thu * K' vin K_ the public the accurate
! fi u °t«t>on8 in all classes of grain,
P r °duce and meats,
Hay and Grain.
I Wheat, Marquis, bulk.
! Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net. delivered to warehouses 2.07
The following market quotatiopa
I are the prices paid to the producer
I i_
j Wheat, BÏues'tem'NÔ!"!, sacked
$ 2 . 10 %
n et, delivered to warehouses 2.16
Wheal Fcrtyfold, No. 1, bulk
, net, delivered to warehouses 2.07
W neat. Fortyfold. No. 1. s'k'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.16
; Wheat, White Club, No. 1, bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.03
Wheat, White Club. No. 1. sVd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.15
] Wheat Red Russian, No. 1, blk
net, delivered to whses. 1.97 2.03
Eggs, per dozen .
Butter, cresmerv. per ib
Butter ranch, per lb ..
Potatoes, per cwt....$100
Young Chickens, per lb.20022 *
Hens, live wt.. ,20022c
Old Roosters, per lb .8010c
Hogs, live wt, light, lb 17%@18%c
Hogs, live wt., heavy', per lb. 16016%
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb. .19020c
Hogs, dressed, light per lb [email protected]
Veal, live wt., per 'lb
Veal, dressed, per lb.
Spring lambs, per lb..
Mutton per lb
' .
j
Wheal Red Russian, No. 1 skd
net, del. to whses... .2.06% 2.12
No. 1 Feed Oats, sacked, per
cwt. net. Delivered to ware
h ->upe.- ,
2.56
No. 1 Timothy Hay. per ton.
White Beans, per pound....
Produce.
.$30.00
....5c
. .30c
«Sc
66c
....9011
. ,17018c
..lOHHlc
8c

xml | txt