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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, April 16, 1919, Image 5

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-04-16/ed-1/seq-5/

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o
R P H E U
M
THE PARAMOUNT THEATRE
THURSDAY
"THE MAKEBELIEVE WIFE"—5 Reels
SOCIETY STUFF, 2 reel L. K. O. with the female Chaplin,
ALICE HOWELL
Too good to miss if you are looking for amusement
fV
rr
Cit£ \eu>s
Weather—Tonight, fair and warmer.
Thrusday, probably showers.
A number of members of the Ma-,
sonic lodge will go tomorrow to Lew
iston by automibles to attend a ses
sion of the Scottish Rights of
Masonry.
Frank Wallen, trustee of school dis
trict No. 78, near Troy, was in Moscow
yesterday.
H. D. Hadden, east of Moscow, was
in town today on business.
Before selling your Hogs, Cattle,
Veal or Mutton, call phone 7 and get
our price. Hagan and Cushing Co.
152-tf
Miss Marie Tenwick of Aberdeen,
Wash., is visiting her brother, C. A.
Tenwick.
A. Y. W. C. A. meeting of all Uni
versity girls was held this afternoon
at 4 o'clock at Ridenbaugh hall.
The tryout for the Montana debate
will be held at the University, April
25th.
Easter Candies, Bunnies,
Brackerts.
Dean Thomson left for Boise yes
terday to attend a meeting of the new
bureau of mines and geology, recently
established by the state legislature.
John Waide of Kendrick, Harold
Thomas, Miss Phyllis Cain, Robert
Cain, Eton Douglas, and Wm. Watts of
American ridge were among the num
ber in Moscow yesterday attending the
funeral of Mrs. Warney May.
C. C. Conklin of Cora was in Mos
cow yesterday on business.
A. Adams of Juliaetta is a Moscow
Chicks.
169-0
visitor today.
G. F. Walker of Kendrick was in
the city yesterday.
Ladles and Children's Hose, 19c.
Brackerts.
Word has been received from Mrs.
C. C. Brown of Innisfree, Alberta, that
she found her son,
and rapidly improving from a severe
attack of influenza. Mrs. Brown says
the crops in Canada look fine and
the climate much like Idaho.
Frank Stevens left yesterday for
Starbuck, called by the death of his
mother, an aged woman of 86 years.
The jail at the court house is
strengthened by covering the brick
walls with sheets of steel. This pre
caution is taken to prevent in the fu
ture any escape of prisoners,
brick wall was not much of a barrier.
Thin Glass Tumblers, 10c. Brack
169-0
169-0
Frank, better
The
erts.
A
The Excelsior society of Creekmur's
Business college held a delightful so
cial last evening. About 60 young
people attended, who spent the eve
ning in playing games. Light refresh
ments were served.
The funeral of Mrs. Warney May oc
cured yesterday at 11 o'clock at the
Methodist church on American ridge
and interment was made in the Mos
Many of her friends
cow cemetery,
accompanied the remains to Moscow,
24 automobiles coming from American
ridge.
O. A. Johnson,who formerly lived
in Moscow, passed through the city
this morning on his way from Troy to
Spokane.
Hot Cross Buns for the last week
in Lent. Empire Bakery.
Born, this morning to Mr. and Mrs.
H. B. Dallas, a son.
Prof. Ph. Soul en left today foi- high
school inspection at Burke, Wallace
and Kellogg. He will address a par
ent-teacher meeting Friday evening at
St. Joe.
Miss' June Miller left today for a
This is
169tf
two months' visit at Seattle,
the first vacation in over three years
that Miss Miller has taken from her
duties in the Western Union as tele
graph operator.
Mrs. Fred Ameberg of Troy under
went an operaton for appendicitis in
Moscow this morning.
A. T. West, owner of the Moscow
telephone and telegraph branch, is in
the city from Davenport.
Roy Headley arriyed today to visit
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Head
ley. Mr. Headley is in the govern
\ ment forestry work and is now located
He nas re
at Washington, D. C.
cently been at Missoula and Spokane.
Miss Fern Berry, who has been em
ployed in thç telephone office, left
today for her home at Peck, Idaho.
She expects to spend the summer at
Great Falls. Mont.
New Students Enter University.
A number of students have entered
the University of Idaho, for the work
of the second semester. Virginia Mc
Rae, of Spokane takes up work in the
sophomore class; Pauline and Ruth
Frezise of Ashton, Idaho, are fresh
men; Arthur Horning of Kamiah, en
ters as a senior to graduate this
year; Wm. Turnbow is a sophomore
from Palouse; Lyman Whittier is a I
*
I
WHERE EVERYBODY GOES
TONIGHT ONLY
BERT LYTELL
—in—
a
THE HIGH SPOTS
A Real Drama of the West
LYONS MORAN COMEDY
SHOWS 7 - 8:30—22c
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
YOUR FAVORITE
TOM MIX
MR. LOGAN, U. S. A."
3 SHOWS DAILY—2 - 7 - 8:30
ALL SEATS 22c
I
freshman from the Moscow high
school ; Frank Cassidy is a junior
from the University of Montana; Har
ry Hartwell is a junior; Pecy O'Brien
of Coeur d'Alen enters as a special
student.
Barrel as Novel Mousetrap.
When difficulty is encountered in
Adding a place of mice by the ordi
nary methods, try this one, which is
outlined by S. L. Bastln in Popular
Mechanics Magazine: Get a fairly
tight barrel and bore a hole near the
bottom to serve as an entrance. Throw
into the barrel a quantity of shavings
or any material that would be useful
to the mice in forming nests. Add
some grain to serve as an additional
attraction and then cover with a piece
of wood. Let the barrel remain In a
place infested with mice for a week
or ten days. At the end of this time
numbers of the creatures will have
taken up their abode In the barrel and
be busy nest making. Then stop up
the hole In the bottom with a cork
or wood plug of proper size, lift up
the cover of the barrel a little and
pour In water until there is sufficient
to drown the occupants. The trap
may be emptied and, after drying, set
up again. In this way a locality is
soon cleared of mice.
"Martyrs."
The word "martyr" has various
meanings. Specifically, it is still con
fined to those who give their lives for
their religious convictions. The "Holy
Innocents" are a notable example of in
voluntary martyrdom. The word "mar
tyr" should not be applied to a
person who loses more, property, but is
used to persons who have died while
striving to attain their object. The
dictionary gives as the primary defini
tion of "martyr"—"One who submits
to death rather than forswear his re
ligion ; specif., one of the early Chris
tians who suffered death for their re
ligion." In general, the word is used
also to denote one who sacrifices him
self for a cause, as a martyr to the
pursuit of wealth.
Roosevelt Knew Youth.
This story by John Burroughs Illus
trates Theodore Roosevelt's tender
and sympathetic nature: Near a little
brown schoolhouse. Burroughs writes,
by the railroad track the school ma'am
and her scholars were drawn up in
line to see the presidential train pass.
The president was at luncheon, but
leaving the table rushed to the plat
form and waved his napkin. When he
came back he said : "Those children
wanted to see the president of the
United States, rind I could not disap
point them. They may never have
another, chance. What a deep Impres
sion such things make when we are
young."
Daily news today. Read The Daily
Star-Mirror.
THE DAILY S PAR-MIRROR.
DECIDE YOURSELF
I The opportunity Is Here, Backed by
Moscow Testimony.
Don't take our word for it.
Don't depend on a stranger's state
ment.
Read Moscow endorsement.
Read the statements of Moscow
1 citizens.
I And decide for yourself.
Here is one case of it.
Henry Eutsler, retired rancher, 120
S. Almond St., says: "I have used
: Doan's Kidney Pills and I know they
I are good. My back was often so lame
I and pained so severely I would be
I laid up. The kidney secretions would
i pass too frequently, too, especially at
i night, which broke my rest. Doan's
j Kidney Pills, have always jjiven me
j relief and I have great faith in them."
Price 60c, at all dealers. Don't
I simply ask for a kidney remedy—get
Doan's Kidney Pills—-the same that
Mr. Eutsler had. Foster-Milburn Co.,
Mfgrs., Buffalo, N. Y.
Ironic, We Say.
Detroit, Mich.—A useless sign
pasted on a <reat mass of iron weigh
ing about twenty tons, lying In a yard
la the following:
'
Deep interest is being taken in the
Passion Week services of the Moscow
Protestant churches, which will be
held every night- this week excepting
Friday. The second meeting of the
series was held in the Brethren church
last night when Rev. Wayne S. Snod
dy, pastor of the Presbyterian church,
delivered a strong sermon to a large
audience. .
Yesterday the Presbyterians of Mos
cow devoted the entire day to church.
work, with a big community dinner
served in the basement at noon. There
was a large attendance of old and new
members and deep interest was mani
fested. There were a number of short
talks by members. The review of the
services furnished by Rev I. A. Mow,
follows:
The second one of the series of
union meetings commemorating the
week Jesus was crucified was held In
the Brethren church last night. The
church was well filled with devout
worshippers. Like the night before,
the devotions were made up of rever
ential hymns, Scripture reading and
Latah Count}' Records.
Tuesday, April 15, 1919.
Navy Discharge—Orval Dean Garri
son.
W. D.—Lena Warner to Nancv
Shephard, $800; E% Lota 5-6 7 Mos
cow.
Farmers Union Warehouse & Mill
ing Co. to J. W. Jones, r-m 12-23-16
(rel.)
Rel.—Nicholas Olson to same, 6-14
Duthie,
Troy,
7 . Lot 1 g ec ]g-38-2W
' ^
n.
Rel.—Same to same, r-m 1-14-10.
W. D,—Jerome W. Jones to W. M.
$1; Lots 7-8-9-10-11-12
Deed—-County of Latah to Kendrick
State Bank. $177; Lot 7-14 Kendrick.
R. M.—Ole Lien to Walter C.
Brooks, $2000; E%SWI4 Lot 4 Sec.
PASSION SERVICES
IRE WELL ATTENDED
LARGE CONGREGATION HEARD
REV. W'. S. 8NODDY IN THE
BRETHREN CHURCH
prayer.
Rev. Hamilton read from Jno. 12:
the Scripture relative to this second
day's work and led in a deep, ferv
ent prayer. Following which Rev.
Biggs read from Matt. 25: the Scrip
ture which p'ortrays Christ's power
and judgment and again led in a plead
ing, urgent prayer for more conse
cration and definite and potential ef
fort in the Christian work.
Rev. Snoddy then recounted the
events of this most arduous Tuesday.
It was a day overflowing with de
fenses, expositions, admonition and
refutation. His triumphal entry, the
lesson of the withered fig tree, and the
cleasing of the temple again raised all
the turious'feeling of. the Jewish lead
They challenged his authority.
He proposed to them one question:
ers.
MOSCOW, IDAHO. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1919
PAGE FIVE
THIS
Pre-Easter
SALE
Offers Unusual
Dresses at
$ 19.75
NEARLY ONE HUNDRED FINE NEW STYLES IN PLAIN AND BEADED
TAFFETAS AND TAFFETA COMBINATIONS — STANDWEAR
GEORGETTES
JERSEYS AND FINE PURE WOOL FRENCH SERGES.
ALL NEW COLORS
AND A DOZEN DIFFERENT STYLES IN EACH SIZE — 16 TO 44
Choice $19.75
NEW ARRIVALS IN CAPES, DOLMANS AND SUITS AT SPECIAL PRICES FOR
EASTER — SEE THEM.
The Fashion Shop
WHERE PRICE AND QUALITY MEET
This opened to
"The baptism of John, was it from
heaven, or of men?"
them their ignorance, fiijthlessness
and dupicity in such a way that they
at once recoiled. Then he gave them
three parables unfolding to them the
consequences of neglecting salvation.
Each revealed the condemnation of
their wicked lives. They again seek
to entrap him by three questions: Giv
ing of tribute; resurrection, and the
supreme commandment. In each of
these their ignorance is again made
to appear and their sins pointed out
to them. Christ then asks them one
question, which effectually silences
them.
"But though He had done so many
signs before them yet they believed
not on Him," was a striking text for
the evening's sermon and forcibly
suggested "The Tragedy of Rejecting
Christ." Jesus knew that He would
j be rejected, that the inevitable end
I of his labors and solicitude for man's
salavation would lead the leaders to
conspire his death. He pressed for
ward in his work with an intrepidity
unusual to men. Even the more
urgent was it that he get His work
nicely finished for the great ordeal.
This most heroic record ever writ
ten solemnly persuades us that a
sinless man in a sinful world must
suffer. It always has been that great
and good men were subjected to
ignominy and death. Socratese was a
good man and he was mobbed for at
tempting to lead men to the truth.
Wm. Carey was denounced as led by a
misleading delusion. Wesley and
Whitfield were thrust out by the then
leaders. The scribes and the Phari
sees and chief priests were the lead
ers and they rejected Christ. The
same forces are rejecting him today,
All men are not against him. Many
men admit that he was the Son of
• God, that He was a good man, that He
j was the giver of life, that He was
unselfishly working to save men from
sin and death; but they do not admit
* themselves to enter the ranks of them
who do the work of _ God. Many who
reject Christ complain that there are
hypocrites in the church. But when
wet search our church roll we find so
very few that bear this evil mark
that we are assured that the man's
observation in this case was erron
eons as in many of his other concerns,
But looking over the records of those
who learned to know the Christ and
His Magnanimous work, and have ex
perienced the benedictions of His di
vine life and presence we are assured
that many, very many have not re
jected Him. The cruel death of the
pure, gentle, loving, generous One is
gruesome to contemplate. But the
pathetic part is not so much in His
bodily pain, personal afflication and
unmitigated suffering as it is in the
indifference, inconsiderateness, heart
less. spurning rejection of the Christ.
While they scoffed at His solicitude
He prayed for them.
3
Christianity is not a religion of re
ceiving but of giving out. Men are
not so much disapproved for what
they have done as for what they have
not done. Many who are having
church affiliations are too remiss. He
has commanded you to promote the
church work. If you do not carry it
out efficiently you reject him. This
Easter time is a good time for self
examination, introspection, meditation
'
How does our life ac
j cord with divine requirement? When
He comes will we be found among the
true? Will we stand on the right or
the left? Shall we have the joy or the
punishment?
i The service tonight is held in the
Christian church and Dean Hamilton
of the Baptist church is the preacher.
On Thursday night the meeting is in
the M. E. church and Rev. J. Quincy
Biggs will deliver the message. The
last service of the series will be held
in the Baptist church with Rev. Har
old Perry of the M. E. church as the
preacher. The public is cordially in
vited.
; and reflec tion,
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J, G. Vennigerholz, Prop.
Moscow, Idaho.
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
.
1
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Loans
MAKER OF CLOTHES FOR THE
MAN WHO KNOWS
Order Now
O. H. SGHWARZ
TAILOR
Hello! Is this Kitley's Market?
Send up a steak as nice as the
last one. Good-bye.
THIRD STREET
MARKET
I
WANTED—500 STOCK
CATTLE
PHONE 248
L. M. KITLEY
Wittcr-Fishcr Co.
bj
V
3
PIPELESS IDAHO
Round Oak Pipeless Furnaces
Before buying see our
s
PHONE 230
.In transit Improved
and Moist Air Furnaces
and get our Prices.
rr
Show Room
jjl [iitTiii irrn mi iiiill
Jx
iV.iME
M
c
E
Better Than Pills
For Liver Ills.

J You can't
k feel so good
tV but what m
j will make you
. feel better. 3
6«ta
25c.
BOX.
ye
t
w
m
Î5.
-IS
THE OWL DRUG STORE
WILL WONDERS NEVER
CEASE?
—Try—
PARTICULAR BREAD
for
PARTICULAR PEOPLE
BUTTERNUT
LOAF
—Hot Off the Wire
—Made Clean
—Baked Clean
—Sold Clean
Only first class materials used in
our Bread, Pies and Pastry.
Baked By Electricity—The Mod
ern Way
Electric
Bakery
PRESSNELL & BETHEL

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