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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, May 22, 1919, Image 4

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-05-22/ed-1/seq-4/

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A KEROSENE
RANGE
that will transform the Kerosene into
a Gas and by this you have a gas range.
Jl.
the Detroit
Vapor
Stove
rta:
No wicks or burners to burn out; it will
last as long as a coal or wood range,
without repair and never to get out of
order. You can make your cooking a
comfort and avoid the heat in your kit
chen during the hot summer months.
The Baby
Grand
Electric
Maytag
Washer
&
M
v '
k.'
I
i
V
III
y
:
&
I
is a wonder.
We carry them in stock.
Come and let us demon
strate these Washing
Machines to you. We are
pleased to do so even if
you do not need one now.
Be posted on the new in
ventions and be ready
when you do need one.
—at th<
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Empire
Hardware
Ip!
i
H. KALINOWSKI
BELGIUM 8ÜFFEBE0
- , . . , . ,, 1 ., .
!n his eighteenth letter to The
Star-Mirror from the war zone of
Europe Congressman Burton L.
Prench tells his impressions of the
wrongs done to Belgium and France.
His letter follows:
Brussels, Belgium, Apr. 11, 1919.
The Editor The Star-Mirror;
Belgium shows the scorge of war
and yet it was visited upon her in
such a way as will permit of more
prompt recovery than France. Many
of her cities were destroyed and her
territary for the most part was oc
cupied by Germans for fous years,
yet except in the southwestern part,
her territory was not a constant bat
tie field as was the northern part of
France, and aside from in this region, I
LESS IHM FfMNGE
CONGRESSMAN FRENCH VISITS
BRUSSELS AND TELLS OF
DEVASTATION THERE
Good Farm Lands
For Sale Cheap
tt you wish to purchase a first class wheat, stock or dairy ranch at
a reasonable price, write us
Good Climate Good Market
Good Productive Soil
For reference inquire of John A. Nisbet, Dufur, Oregon, formerly
of Genesee, Idaho.
il
DUFUR VALLEY REALTY CO.
DUFUR, OREGON
for the most part military operations
were comparatively short, even,
though they were desperately severe.
Belgium is a small country about
one-eighth the size of Idaho, and witjjx
a population of 8,000,000 people.
We drove over some four or fiw hun
dred miles of her roadways,'and'saw
not only her farming lands but her
great cities and her regions that suf
fered most by the war. We were in
Brussels and Antwerp, beautiful and
splendid old cities which show noth
ing of war's ravages. We also vis
it< f d Charleiôr Dinout, Mons, Namur,
Louvain Malines, Termonde, Ghent,
B ZeBroges, Ostende, and other
o-.im to
pun ishment "
d s terrine punisnmenu
At the beginning of the war it was
the undoubted policy of the German
military power to endeavor to bring
the war to an end in the shortest
possible time by making it as hideous
'and terrible as possible. Louvain
and Malines and Dinout and other
lesser cities were ruthlessly treated
as a warning to Brussels and Ant
Iwerp, and to throw terror into the
souls of the Belgian people. Facto
ries and other business houses were
reduced to ashes; chu rches, schools ,
and, hemes were wrecked and pillag
ed Jimd the
The Problem of reconstruction is
the serious work that is now ahead.
With a population so dense, a slight
disturbance of business works harm,
and such havoc as befell all Belgium
during the war must claim time to
right again. For instance at Charle
roi we found a city of some fifteen or
twenty thousand people before the
war in ruin. In and around the city
were steel mills. We visited the
ruins of one of them. It had been
built at a cost of $3,000,000. It fur
nished employment to between two
and three thousand men. Near by
non resisting civilian
..vivvMation were in city alter city vls
Jieci with untempered punishment in
pii attempt to break the spirit of
Belgium and as a sign to the world
of what might be expected from the
despotic, military, autoerocy of Ger
many.
But the invader has been expelled
and the Belgian people are happy.
Not only are they happy but they are
grateful to America for our part in
.he war and for the relief work in
which we were engaged in Belgium
before our declaration of two years
" 0 .
such institutions. The coal mines
near by employed some five or six
thousand men. The coal mines here
were not badly damaged but who
would buy coal? Who could buy?
Who could buy the butter, the eggs,
the garden products, the meat, the
foods of all kinds produced upon the
farm ? Who could buy and pay for
these things ? Who could employ la
bor and what is the first thing that
was not paralysis. True the people
are poor, they are very poor, but
i they are trying to do team work,
j They seemed to be patient. At the
I old mill site a limited number of men
were at work. Salvaging such things
; as might be of value and cleaning
I away the debris.
1 As I see it, in spite of all that can
j be done the work of rebuilding Bel
! g'ium and Europe as well, must be
j slow. People will need to feel their
j way, and day by day a few more men
j will find employment than were em
I ployed the day before. A s this pro
! ceeds, times will gradually become
! normal. But It will take time,
j Years? Yes, in some lines. In the
Î meantime the world and especially
! the countries that have suffered least
! and whose lands have not been invad- j
I ed must be sympathetic and patient.
: Even in those countries times will be
! hard, no doubt, but we will attain
the most by being calm, by refusing
to rock the boat, and by maintaining
that splendid spirit of self sacrifice
and earnestness to bear part of the
world's burden that have been char
acteristic of the American people for
the last four years.
Very truly,
BURTON L. FRENCH. J
BAPTIST REVIVAL
ON ITS LAST WEEK
EVA > G EU ST MARSHALL ('LOSES
MLS WORK I> MOSCOW -NEXT
SUNDAY E VENIN«;
The attendance came up again Tues
day night and the people were at
tentive as usual to the evangelist. The
text was from the T19th Psalm and
59-60 verses. "Here we find a man
thihking, turning and rdnning," said
Dr. Marshall as he announced his
subject. "The greatest book for you is
the one you are writing, your own
life. The greatest drama for you is
that of your own life. A man at the
station in a California town shook his
fist at me and asked me why his
wife had told me of his domestic af
fairs. He said 1 had pointed him
out in the service and said that he
had no rest at night and his life was
in a turmoil. I persuaded him I re
ally knew nothing of his affairs. He
was thinking on his own life and uin
1 and I saw him in that meeting find
Christ and joy of heart." One of the
really fine exhibitions of description
came last night when Dr. Marshall de
scribed a southerner whose wife was
a Christian and who always delighted
to get ministers into trouble with his
clever questions. Dr. Marshall dares
him to church and the man is saved.
Not, however, by the evangelist's ser
mon. He gets to thinking what an un
worthy husband and father he is.
"But thinking on your ways will not
save you," cried the evangelist. "Div
ies in hell put up a fine system of
thinking. And you may occupy the
chair of history in the University of
'Idaho and yet go to hell. You must
turn from your evil ways. Conversion
is the turning. But that is not regen
eration.. Kegeneration is God's answer
ot a new heart when yon have turned
right about face. Some folk turn all
right and keep on turning and never
miss a service for the devil. Then
some turn their feet toward the way
of the Lord but they keep their faces
looking back to the evil things of
the world. Then there are other peo
ple who never turn their feet in the
right way but they look in the right
direction and they never get any
where. The divine son of God, the
Savior of the world has the sure rem
edy for sin. Surrender to Him.
Dr. Marshall speaks tonight upon |
"Crutches and Canes." Service at 8
o'clock.
P ^
Do Your Best.
Everyone should do all he can to
provide for his family and in order
to do this he must keep his physical
system in the best condition possible.
No one can reasonably hope to do
much when he is sick a good share
of the time. If you are constipated,
bilious or troubled with indigestion
get a package of Chamberlain's Tab
lets and follow the plain printed di
rections, and you will soon be feeling
alright and able to do a day's work.
(M.)
ja
Latah County Records,
Tuesday. May 20, 1919.
W. D.—Ida J. Halverson, Eddie
Halvorson, Jennie A. Driscoll, Ingal
M. Halvorson, to Anton O. Halverson,
?1; und 4-6 int in NE% 30-38-4W.
W. D.—Ida J. Halvorson, Anton
Halvorson, Jennie A. Driscoll, Ingal
M. Halvorson to Eddie C. Halvorson,
$4; 5-6 int in NW% 2MS8-4.
CORA CORRESPONDENCE
MARTIN SELLS HIS FARM
CORA.—Jacob Martin has sold his
forty on west Deep creek and started
overland Monday with his family to
Clarkia, where his son, Calvin has
taken a homestead.
Mrs. Laura Meeks is visiting her
mother, Mrs. Rogers.
Lora and Arthur Powell are visit
ing at Kennewick at the home of
their uncle, Gene Larkin, picking
strawberries.
Mrs. George Ogle spent the week
end visiting her brother, Bert Hutton
before starting to Walla Walla,
where the family expect to spend
the summer.
School closed at the Elmore last
Friday with a picnic. A new school
house is to be built on the same site
before another school term opens.
Earl Short and family are now
domiciled in the house belonging to
Mr. Moe for the summer.
HARVARD HAPPENINGS
SCHOOL CLOSED FRIDAY
Harvard school closed a successful
term Friday, May 16, under the able
management of Miss Margaret Terry,
in charge of the advanced grades and
Miss Manilla Hanson, of the inter
mediate grades and Miss Jo Guy of
the primary.
On Thursday evening, May 16th,
Stewarts hall was filled to overflow
ing by those who gathered to witness
one of the most beautiful and im
pressive entertainments ever produc
ed on the upper Palouse, when grad
uation exercises were held and a class
of seven of our boys and girls com
pleted the work of the grammar
school and were given their eighth
grade diplomas. The stage was beau
tifully decorated in red, white and
blue, the colors of the class.
The invocation was given by Mrs.
Barrager after which the following
program was given:
FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FOR CUSTOMERS WHO WANT FRESH CLEAN
CRISP STOCK
Only the best sent out on phone orders—Phone 36
Golden Gate Coffee
Hills Bros. Coffee
Reid & Murdock's Fancy Groceries
Another car of Flour—Snow Mount, the best.
hard wheat flour; Olympic—admitted to be
the best soft wheat.
SERVICE—QUALITY GROCERIES
(
WASHBURN & WILSON
j
Dollar
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Day
TOMORROW
l
REMEMBER
ITS ALWAYS A DAY FOR. THE. THRIFTY BUYER
Salutatory .Grace Stark
"Spring Song" ..„Song by the school
Class Picture .Vladimar Kinnan
Piano and violin duet, "Yellow Jon
quij"
Essay .......John Glêason
Song ."Rose Dreams"
i 0 . r/ •
Class Colors ....... Beatrice Kinnan
Vocal Duet—Manilla Hanson and Jo»
ujr ,_, „ i tu
Instnimentaf duet ' ^ e 611 bbompson
Class will .Harold Guntoa
Class song, "Red, White and Blue."
Valedictory .Freda Queener
Benediction .Mrs. Barrager
Music for the exercises was fur
nished by G. H. Kinnan and Mrs.
Terry on the violin and piano.
The young people handled their
work in a way that would do credit
to older students in the city schools
and shows what talent and practice
can be made to produce.
The flower adopted by the class is
the red rose, apd the motto which
these young people start on their
journey through life is "Climb,
though the rocks be rugged."
After an impressive talk by Miss
Terry, diplomas were presented to
Grace Stark, Beatrice Kinnan, Freda
Queener, Helen Thompson, John
Gleason, Vladimar Kinnan and Har- 1
old Gunton.
The class plays, "Snow White" and
C.
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Brigade of wonderfully clever girls in novel drills and dances coming to
Moscow with the big musical spectacle "My Soldier Girl" at the Kenworthy
Theatre, Saturday night, May 24.
"A Box of Monkeys," given Friday
evening were witnessed by a large
crowd, despite the bad weather.
"Snow White" came first, about one
half of the school taking part. Louise
Tibbetts played in the role of the
Princess Snow White, Helen Thomp
son acted as the jealous queen step
mother, Vladimar Kinnan was the
prince and E i mer Johnson, Carl the
Huntsman. The characters were all
dressed in appropriate costume for
„ . ,, , ,, .
, £ Box of Monkeys was made up
. five characters those taking part
being Misses P reda Queener, Manilla
Hanson and Jo Guy and Lewis Hom
by and RolI ° Moore -
Both evening's entertainment fcere
put on successfully and everyone ex
pressed themselves that it was all
that could be wished,
Other successful applicants for di
plomas in the recent eighth grade ex
aminations in this vicinity were Wes
ley Afted and Berold Malcolm of *
Woodfell and Lois Bay and Lloyd
Cook of Chambers Flat. Despite the
fact that ten weeks were lost during
the last school term on account of
influenza quarantine, eleven of the
twelve applicants to write the exam
inations passed successfully, which
speaks very highly, not only for the
hard work of the pupils but for the
teachers as w £Ui
the play.

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