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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, June 02, 1919, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
▼GLUME VIII
NUMBER 109
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO MONDAY, JUNE 2, 1919
AUSTRIANS ARE HANDED SEVERE PEACE TERMS
Austria today learned something of the cost of her alliance with Ger
many in an attempt to rule the world and crush all opposing nations. The
once proud and haughty ' dual empire" pictured as an eagle with two heads,
is reduced from a great empire with a population of 50,000,000 inhabitants,
° comprising many states, to an absolutely powerless state with only about
six or seven million population. All of her rights as a powerful nation, as
well as most of her territory is taken from her and she is reduced to the
status of a colony, to be governed by those she had planned to rule with
- an iron hand/,
The peace treaty for Austria was handed to the Austrian delegates by
Premier Clemenceau, president of the peace conferenc, at 12:22 o'clock today.
Premier Clemenceau talked but three minutes in presenting the terms. The
Austrians consumed half an hour in replying. This being their only chance
to talk, they took advantage of it. There will be no further verbal dis
cussion. All discussion must be made in writing. Austria has 15 days in
which to file her final answer.
Italian Claims Still Unsettled.
PARIS.—(By the Associated Press.)—The peace terms were presented
to Austria today with the problem of Italy's claims in the Adriatic unsolved.
The council of four held a brief meeting before going to St. Germain this
morning. Premier Orlando of Italy, and Colonel House of the United
States were present. The Adriatic question was discussed.
Austrians Get Peace Terms.
ST. GERMAIN, France.—Austria today was given 15 days in which to
reply to the peace terms presented by the allied nations.
The Austrian representatives, escorted by an Italian officer, arrived at
the chamber at 12:22 o'clock, entering the chamber by the rear entrance.
Immediately upon their arrival the session was formally opened. Premier
Clemenceau, president of the conference, immediately began his address.
He spoke only three minuses. Paul Dutasta, general secretary of the delega
tion, Austrian chancellor and head of the delegation, began an address in
French,
He began with a complaint at the delay In presentation of the peace
terms and declared that the Austrian republic is entirely free from the
Hapsburg dynasty and would never declare war, itself, he asserted. He con
cluded his address at 12:56.
The Austrian Peace Terms.
Austria is left, by this treaty, a state of from six to seven million people
Inhabiting territory .between five and six thousand square miles.
She is required to recognize the complete independence of Hungary,
Czecho-Slovakia, the Serb-Croat-Slovene state and to cede other territories
which previously were in uniôn with her, and which composed the Austria
Hungarlan empire, with a population of over 60,000,000 people.
Austria must agree to accept the league of nations covenant and the
labor charter and renounce all her extra European rights and demobilize
her whole naval and aerial forces and admit the right by trial by the allied
and associated powers, of her nationals who were guilty of violating the
laws an,d customs of force and to accept detailed provisions similiar to those
in the German treaty, regarding economic relations and freedom of transit.
Some riauses Not Yet Presented.
Those clauses not yet ready for presentation are to be delivered as soon
as possible, the Austrians, in the meantime to have an opportunity to begin
work on the greater part of the treaty in an effort to facilitate the final de
cision.
The Austrian treaty follows exactly the same outline as the German
treaty, and, in many places, is identical, except for change of name. Certain
specific clauses which applied only to Germany are, of course, omitted, and
certain new clauses included, especially as regards the creation of new states
out of former Austria-Hungarian empire and the protection of racial, religi
ous, linguistic minorities in Austria, Czech-Slovakia and the Serb-Croat
Slovene state.
The 15 days stipulation regarding Austria's reply, refers only to that
portion of the terms handed them today.
Gives Up All Colonies and Outside Rights.
WASHINGTON.—The official summary of the Austrian peace terms
made available in diplomatic circles here today includes the following:
"Outside of Europe Austria renounces all rights, titles and privileges to
her own or her allies' territories to all the allied and associated powers and
undertakes to accomplish whatever measures are taken by the principal
allied powers in relation thereto.
Norway Refuses to Join Blockade.
Press.)—Norway has refused to join the block
en^iüiy in case the German delegates refuse to sign the peace treaty.
, PARIS.—-?Sy Associated
SINGS AT PULLMAN
WORLD'S GREATEST SINGER
TO GIVE CONCERT AT W. S.
C. MONDAY, JUNE 9
Mme. Schuman-Heink, one of the
world's greatest singers, has been en
gaged by the State College of Wash
ington, at Pullman, for a concert in
the College Auditirium on Monday
evening, June 9th. Mme Schumann
Heink will be assisted by Ernesto
Berumen, Mexican pianist, and Frank
La Forge, composer-pianist.
On account of the good roads at this
season of the year, it is possible for
people of the Inland Empire to go to
Pullman by automobile on this date
and return to their homes after the
concert. Large delegations are ex
pected from all principal points be
tween Spokane and Lewiston.
Citizens of Moscow and vicinity
who desire to attend the, concert
should order their tickets early. Seats
for Mme. Schuman-Heink's concerts
are almost invariably sold out in the
advance sales. ~
Tickets will be on sale at Watt's
Pharmacy, Pullman, commencing
Monday ,June 2nd. The price will be
$2.00 (plus war tax of 20 cents.)
Mail orders for tickets received be
fore June 2nd will be filled on the
morning of that date and the tickets
mailed to purchasers Later orders
will be filled as soon as received.
The program of the concert follows:
Vitellia Aria (in Ifalian)W. A .Mozart
. i.
Mme. Schumann-Heink
II.
Ballet of the Happy Spirits. .
. .. . Gluck-Friedman
.Haydn
. Beethoven
Minuetto
Dance ..
La Forge
.. . Seccho !
Carpenter !
Ernesto Berumen
III.
Before the Crusifix.
When Two That Love are Parted
The Home Road
ing Into Picardy. .J'. H. Rogers
Mme. Schumann-Heink
I
La Forge ;
Liszt
j
I
I
:
1
I
[
|
1
I
j Have You Seen Him in France..
.*.W ardStephens
Pasternack
When Pershing's Men Go 'March
Taps
IV.
:
I Romance
Tarantelle
..Ernesto Berumen
I
V.
i My Heart Ever Faithful
j Indian Love Song .
Danza .
! His Buttons Are Marked "U. S.
Carrie Jacobs Bond
.Bach
Liaurance
Chadwick
j
j
:
1 sistant to the secretary of war, has no
[ tified the local offices of the United
; States employment service that he has
' asked every state and municipal of
j fleer to report all licenses Issued to
I Bolero (in Italian) .
Mme. Schumann-Heink
Arditi
"Soldiers as Peddlers."
Colonel Arthur Woods, special as
discharged soldiers and sailors for
peddling privileges. The emergency
employment committee of the council
of national defense for discharged sol
diers and sailors will undertake*to
ascertain whether such soldiers or sail- |
ors are peddling of necessity or by
choice. If the men are peddling of
necessity, efforts will be made to ob
;
. , .. , ....
tam better employment for them. The
committee hopes to prevent both the
exploitation of the uniform and the
appearance of public neglect, which
is held to be suggested by the ap
pearance of service men as peddlers.
WINNEPEG.—Several hundred re
turned soldiers and other strike sym
pathizers gathered before the city
hall today and told Mayor Gray they
were going to visit parliament for the
third time and would visit the board
of trade and the newspaper offices on
■ ,
Soldiers Aid Strikers,
the way.
Rc
Don't forget the fchamber of com
merce luncheon at noon tomorrow.
(Tuesday) will be an important one as
final arrangements must be made to
care for several hundred visitors who
will be here Wednesday, Thursday,
Friday and Saturday.
METHODISTS HAVE RAISED ALL
BUT $10,000,000 OF THE
REQUIRED SUM
ALMOST COMPLETE
The great drive for $105,000,000 for
the Methodist church in its centen
niai year, has been quite successful.
At last reports the drive lacked but
$10,000,000 of being complete and it
is thought that districts and churches
which have not reported will put it
over the top. In the report given
below Moscow is credited with only
part of its quota. But this is Moscow
district, which includes many towns
and churches outside of Latah coun-I
ty. Moscow went over the top with
several hundred dollars to spare, be
fore the expiraiton of the time limit.
The following report from Portland
tells about the drive:
Portland, May 30.—A total of $94,
434,000 of the $105,000,000 asked for
in the Methodist centenary campaign
has been subscribed, according to an
announcement today by Dr. Charles
A. Bowen, executive secretary of the
centenary in the nort'hwest. _
The northwest total is $2,040,137 on
a quota of $2,383,000. Two hundred
and seventy five churches have gone
over the top, equalling or exceeding
their quotas.
Leaders in the campaign are hope
ful that when all reports have been
completed, the Methodist centenary
will show a 100 per cent subscription.
"During the last 100 years, the
Methodist Episcopal church has sub
scribed the equivalent of 100 tons
of gold or 1640 tons of silver dollars,"
said Dr. Bowen.
"Our 100 tons of gold has carried
the word of Christianity into 37 na
tions of the world. We propose to
spend, in the next five years, more
than we have spent in the past 100
years expending the epuivalent of
160 tons of gold, or 3,000 tons of sil
ver dollars.
"This would make a train nearly
two-thirds of a mile long and heav
ier than the most powerful locomotive
can draw."
Four districts in the-northwest
have already gone over their quotas.
District quotas and totals follow:
Reported
Raised
$141,232
296,585
186,170
113,599
145,740
128,362
125,716
95,550
121,503
j
Quota
District
Bellingham
Seattle
Tacoma
Olympia
Vancouver
Spokane
Wenatchee
Moscow
Walla Walla
$161,870
271,760
160,895
105,280
133,240
170,215
139.360
132,426
159,860
94,589
225,795
179,179
89,267
55,256
15,950
The Dalles
Portland
Salem
Eugene
Klamath
101,565
240.360
210,540
164,710
81,440
24,545
Pacific German
Western Norwegian
Danish
24,545
18,711
$2,040,137
Aa
Tim Sullivan Returns.
Tim Sullivan, Ford salesman at
Moscow," returned last night from a
trip to Seattle where he attended the
Convention of Ford agents at the
Ford assembling plant.
1300. Ford agents were guests of the
company at the convention. Mr. Sulli
van says the assembling plant at Se
attle carries more than a million dol
lar stock now and the stock is un
ually low. Mr. Sullivan visited Brem
erton, Ballard, Tacoma, Everett and
all of the towns around Seattle and
came back through Portland where
he spent several days. He says Se
attle is the busiest city of the west
and that every one seems to be busy,
prosperous and happy. He enjoyed
the trip immensely but is glad to get
back. It had been 16 years since he
had visited Seattle.
More than
ilies, who have been visiting in the
Lewiston country, have returned to
their homes at Joel. ' _
5
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4- Recognizes Revolutionists. T
I * SAN SALVADOR —The govern- 4
! 4' ments of Guatemala.
1 4* and Nicauragua has
"♦ the belligerency of the anti-Tin- 4*
! ♦ oco revolutionists in Costa Rica, 4*
I 4* according to a dispatc h received 4*
j 4* here from Nicaragua. The ad
14> vices state the revolutionists ♦
.j. have received appreciable rein- +
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Hunduras 4*
recognized ♦
*
•2* forcements.
+ + + + + + + +
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SEC roMMERUF BOOSTSFOR °
^OMMLRCE TOOb FS h OR
\ MOSCOW S MEETINGS
L. F. Parsons, secretary of the Mos
cow Chamber of Commerce, is at the
Davenport. "We are preparing for
the second semi-annual meeting of the
North Idaho Chamber of Commerce
which will be held at Moscow June
4 and 5," said Mr Parsons. "The first
meeting was held at Coeur d'Alene
last May. A meeting was to have
been held last November, but on ac
count of the influenza was called off.
"Delegates from the Chamber of
commerce, commercial clubs and busi
ness men's associations of the follow
ing towns of the 10 counties of north
ern Idaho will attend the meeting:
Sandpoint, Bonners Ferry, Coeur
d'Alene, Kellogg, Wallace, Harrison,
Moscow, Lewiston, Orofino, Marys
ville, Nez Perce, Kendrick, Volmer
Ilo, Winchester, Cottonwood, Culde
sac, Genesee, Juliaetta, Rathdrum
Post Falls, Athol, Clarks Fork, Koos
kia, Kamiah, Orangeville and Stites.
"The farmers' unions, county com
missioners of the 10 counties of north
ern Idaho, and the state highway
commissioners and other state offi
cials have also been invited to at
tend.—Spokesman-Review.
Congressman Burton L. trench has
decided to help two Idaho soldier boys
who are returning from service to
an opportunity to work their way
thru college; one of them B. G.
Henson, of Athol, Idaho, and the
other Edward Prince of Canyon
county. Mr. Henson, it is understood,
will take up the study of law, and
Mr. Prince, a pre-medical course
their employment in the House of
^ 3016 h
V,,
French Helps Idaho Boys
WASHINGTON.—Under the pat
ronage of the house, now that it
has gone republican, each member
of Congress will be entitled to
eighteen hundred dollars worth of the
patronage .
n . nffi A . .
n w f rf ; Sted ,, ra
DENVER,—Warrants for the ra
aest of Robert A. Brown, cashier ot
the closed City Bank and Trust Com
P res î° ent
of the Colorado Pitch-Blende Com
pany, were issued today. Brown is
charged with embezzlement and lar
ceny of a $20,000 check, and Barn
hill with being an accomplice.
Prof. Lewis at Genesee
Prof. H. T. Lewis, of the University
of Idaho, spoke at Genesee, Friday at
the memorial exercises, which were
well attended. There were a large
number of veterans of former wars
as well as a number of recently re
turned soldiers from overseas. The
attendance was large and a patriotic
program was carried out.
_!■'_
Huns Lost Many Submarines
BASLE, (French Wireless Service)
—Germany lost 198 submarines dur
ing the war, according to statistics
ppublished in the Berlin Vossische
Zeitung. The number included sev
en submarines interned in foreign
ports and 14 destroyed by their own
crews.
More than 3000 sailors lost their
lives in the submarine sinkings, while
several thousand others lost their rea
son and had to be committed to lun
atic asylums.
The administration in charge of railroads and telegraph lines won in
the supreme court today when a decision was handed down permitting
; an increase in freight and passenger rates on the railroads and other decision
holds that Burleson had a right to increase telegraph and telephone rates
last January. The decisions follow:
Railroad Rate» Increase Upheld.
WASHINGTON.—The railroad freight and passenger rate increases made
by the railroad administration last June were upheld today by the supreme
court.
The court also set aside the lower court decrees, which held under sec
tion 15, railroad control act, that pre-existing intrastate rates remained in
effect as lawful police regulations.
The court held that the authority conferred by resolution and act of war
powers were conferred on the president and federal government's power is
"supreme and conclusive." The opinion is unanimous.
Telephone and Telegraph Get Boost, Too.
WASHINGTON.—Increased telephone and telegraph rates put into effect
last January 21, under orders of Postmaster General Burleson were upheld
today by the supreme court. The court held that under the joint resolution
by which the wire systems were taken over by the government, there is
authority for interfering with intrastate rates.
No Telegraph Strike Ordered.
WASHINGTON.— S. J. Konenkamp, president of the commercial tele
graphers union stated here today that no date has been set for a nation-wide
telegraphers strike and that the threatened walk-out at Atlanta is purely
a local affair.
POTLATCH PROTESTS
THE BOOZE CHARGE
CORRESPONDENT SAYS
ZENS DID NOT DRINK AT
DANCES, GIVEN BY CLUB
CITII
POTLATCH.—A wave of indig
nation swept over Potlatch yesterday
when The Daily Star-Mirror came out
with a front page article in regard to
the raid made by the county officials
on the Bertoloni residence here, at
which time they confiscated a goodly
supply of liquor. The residents of
Potlatch had no objection to this re
p or ^ being given publicity, but they
do seriously obj'ect to the last par
a g ra ph of the article which states
^at there has been more or less
"booze" at the dances here. This
statement is absolutely unfounded,
rpbe only dances held here for many
; months have been at the Potlatch Am
j a t eur Athletic Club house and pat
■ r0 nized by the best people.
- -
i The Star-Mirror got the story from
John Nesbit,, county attorney, who
'was with Sheriff Moody and Deputy
Sheriff Summerfield when the ar
restes were made Mr Nesb i t , who
i ln j i,„„ n invpt-Ho-if ino- the nnr)
kn | w the factS( k f nd ly gave The Star
Mirror a written statement, of which
following is a verbatim conv of
™ paragraph:
* ' ,_^
, "There were several persons at a
t dan ce a few evenings ago drinking
this brand of liquor, and through this
the sheriff's force received the clue
to the whereabouts of the cache."
In conversation with the editor of
The Star-Mirror Mr. Nisbet said that
drinking at dances in Potlatch had
been the cause of the investigation
which résulte! in the arrests. Both
™ r ' S 5 ™*" coua by attorney, and
Sheriff Woody and his deputy, Chas.
Summerfield, had been working on
the case and probably know the facts
better than any one else.
The Star-Mirror had no intention
or desire to reflect on the good peo-
ple of Potlatch and we are sure the
officers had no intention to cast any
unj'ust reflections upon the good peo-
ple of that town.
-- s
Buys Pure Bred Hogs
W. B. Nicol, who came to Paliuse
about a year ago, buying the Greene
farm, j'ust west of the city limits,
has purchased seven pure bred Po
land China gilts from the animal hus
bandry department of the University
of Idaho, and has spoken fo: a pure
bred boar pig. This is Mr. Nicol's
initial purchase. He plans to estab
lish a herd of first class Poland Chi
nas, and has started in the right
way. The gilts j'ust purchased are
all high class individuals of good
breeding and it is safe to predict that
Mr. Nicol will in a short time Tiave
one of the best herds of pure bred
hogs in this part of the Palouse
country.—-Palouse Republic.
"
Villa Attacks Chihuahua.
Mexico.
*

*
Reports *
4* from trustworthy sources this 4>
,4* morning say that Chihuahua City 4*
4* was attacked in force yesterday 4 1
4* by General Villa and General 4
4* Angeles. Mexican reports say 4 1
4* the fight is still in progress. ♦
♦ t + t + + + t +
JUAREZ.
Band Meeting Tonight.
Everyone interested in forming a
band in Moscow is urged to be present
at the meeting to be held for the pur
pose of organizing tonight at the high
school auditorium. All kinds of band
instruments are wanted. Everyone
who favors having a band in Moscow
should be present, whether they can
play a musical instrument or not.
|Y, M, C. ft, DRIVE
IS ON THIS WEEK .
CAMPAIGN TO RAISE FUNDS IN
IDAHO AND WASHINGTON
OPEN MONDAY
! The Young Men's Christian Associa
j tion celebrates its 75th anniversary
! on June 6th. On that date in 1844 Sir.
| George Williams, then a young dry
t goods clerk in London, gathered about
| him a group of twelve earnest young
Christian men and started the or
! ganization. It was formed to meet
the immediate need among the clerks
in the store. From this humble be
ginning, it was however spread
throughout the world. It has 2300
branches in North America alone,
with a membership of over 700,000. It
has active organizations with modern
equipment, in China, Japan, the Phil
ippines and India. These buildings
are crowded with young men anxious
to Joarn American ways through this
a sency. The Association has been
£ e£U *y to respond to every emergency
f ° r serving men. It had 200 tents m
^ Spamsh-American war.
the troops were sent to the Mexican
border, the Association huts were
amon F l A he first buildings erected in
cam P- As a part of its program in
the great W orld W ar, it had organ
. ized groups at 5,500 different points;
\ 1900 of these were with the American
; France;
Fren * h tr 25 0 with the Itallan
' -il n -x- l r»«—
™ Si'
dlan aad Australian forces and mor*
than 600 huts in the training camps
j n America. Its prrinciples and meth
ods bave proven universal in their
a pplication. It stands for the four
f 0 j d work f 0 r men and boys, namely—
(-be development of the social, educa
tionaal, physical and religious life.
j(. j s primarily a laymen's movement
and is managed by groups of respon
s ;bi e business men.
When
1500 with the
At times it may seem as if the war
from which we are emerging was an
unmixed evil, and yet here and there
good came from it. One of the things
that came from this great war was
a wakened public conscience and a
great spirit of service and conse
cration. Before the war the Interstat
Committee of the Y. M. C. A. for
Oregon and Idaho carried on work
only in the larger cities and colleges,
and at a few industrial points. The
war brought on the realization that
the Y. M. C. A. was not putting on as
broad a as it should, and
*
e
it is proposed to put on a work that,
within the next two years, will place
the benefits of the association work
within the reach of not less than
90 per cent of the boys and young
men of Oregon and Idaho, whether
they live in cities, villages, on the
farm or in industrial centers.
The putting on of the completed
program will require the raising of
$50,000. This amount is to be raised
in a campaign which will be put on
between June 2nd and 9th in Ore
gon and Idaho.
r
Praise for Dr. Liudley
An opportunity will be given the
people of Kendrick to hear Dr.
Lindley at the commencement exer
of the Kendrick High School,
This will be Dr.
rises
Saturday night.
Lindley's first speaking date in Ken
drick, and those who miss hearing him
will lose an opportunity to hear a
speaker who has no peer in the north
west. He talks in such an intensely
interesting manner that one follows
him without conscious effort; he com
mands attention not only by what he
says, but in the delightful manner in
which he says it.—Kendrick Gazette.

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