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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, June 05, 1919, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
VOLUME VIII
NUMBER 212
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 1919
LOYAL WAR VETERANS END
WINNEPEG'S GREAT STRIKE
The great strike at Winnepeg, Manitoba, which threatened to overthrow
authorized government in portions of Canada and turn the dominion over to
holsnivists, is expected to come to a sudden stop as the result of determined
action, by loyal veterans of the great world war, who took a stand today for
the government, pledged themselves to maintain law and order and demanded
the deportation of all undesirable aliens. The dramatic end of the strike
which is well on its third week, came today.
Loyal Veterans Denounce Strikers.
WINEPEG.—(By the Associated Press.)—Over 4000 veterans of the Great
War, including scores of officers and hundreds of union men, after standing
V at "attention" in the auditorium this afternoon singing "God Save the King,"
pledged themselves and their resources to maintain law and order in Win
nepeg, and to stamp out bolshevism and anarchy from the forces of Winnepeg
labor.
Resolutions were passed demanding that the authorities immediately
arrest and punish all persons responsible for the strike situation in Win
nepeg and who have attempted to overthrow the constitutional government
and the deportation of "all undesirable aliens" was also urged.
Strike Leaders Begging For Protection.
Rumors are current here today that the strike committee was consider
ing the advisability of calling off the sympathetic strike, in view of the action
by the war veterans.
Mayor Gray was informed that several thousand soldiers intended to
march to the trades and labor council and force an entrance, if necessary
and demand that all aliens be ousted from Winnepeg unions.
Labor leaders who have publicly and agressively attempted to combat
every federal, provincial and municipal attempt to restore tranquility in
Winnepeg were begging protection, it was learned at the city hall.
The city today took over the distribution of milk and was arranging to
provide bread distribution if necessary.
Paris Strike Situation Better,
PARIS.—(By the Associated Press.)—In competent circles here optimism
prevailed this morning regarding the strike here. Hopes are expressed that
.trouble between the unions and employes will soon be settled.
I. W. W. Found Not Guilty.
SEATTLE.—(By the Associated Press.)—James Bruce, alleged member
of the Industrial Workers of the World, was found by a jury here today, not
guilty of criminal anarchy. The charge placed against Bruce is a result
of his activity during the general strike here.
; s
ROSS HOWARD, OF MOSCOW, A
HEAVIER BUYER OF WOOL
AT LEWISTON, LATELY
The past few days were perhaps the
most active in wool dealing in local
fields in many years. Boston and
Portland firms were well represented
and bidding was very keen. The bulk
of the wool sold was purchased by
Ross Howard for the Columbia Basin
Wool Warehouse of Portland, Ore.,
he having shipped three cars yester
day from Lewiston and Pomeroy.
Owing to the mild winter, the wool
was of excellent quality, the shrink
age being unusually light and most of
the wools containing a large amount
of staple length, enabling the buyers
to pay top prices. The prices paid
ropred from 35 to 46 cents, with a
limVÆ'd number of fancy clips bring
ing as high as 46 1-4 cents. Growers
had anticipated receiving as low as
25 to 35 cents so are highly pleased
with quotations prevailing the last
last few days.
Miss Letitia Frizell, buyer for Ross
Howard, enjoys the distinction of be
ing the first lady wool buyer to buy
in the Lewiston country. Miss Frizell
returned a few days ago from a trip
through the upper Salmon river and
central Idaho section, having pur
chased several thousand fleeces of
wool.
I is estimated that the Salmon
river country will produce about
260,000 fleeces of wool, the larger per
cent of which will be shipped through
the Lewiston gateway by boat to
Portland, which gives advantageous
freight rates to Portland, the wool
market of the west.—Lewiston Trib
une.
LUST T RECITAL
PUBLIC INVITED TO FREE ENTER
TAINMENT. THE LAST OF THE
SCHOOL YEAR
The last University recital of the
year will be given Friday afternoon
in the university auditorium at 4:00
o'clock. There will be no charge and
the public is cordially invited. The
feature of the* program will be a song
cycle for four voices, words from the
Rubaigat of Omar Khayyam, music by
Liza Lihmann.
Following is the program:
Piano solo. Gavotte in G major..Bach
Berceuse . ..
. Chopin
Alice Bessee
Soprano solo, A Forest Song, Whelpley
Ecstacy ....
.... Rogers
Florence Allebaugh
Piano solo, Rondo Cappriccoso....
. Mendelssohn!
Inez Sanger
Ware
Duet, Goodnight
Nathalie Tecklenherg and Bernadine
Adair
Piano solo. Caprice Espangol.
Moskowski
Geraldine Nusbaum
Song. Cycle, In a Persian Garden...
. Lehman
Bernadine Adair, E. A. Bangs,
Nathalie Tecklenherg. Russell
Scott ■
Henrietta Peasley, Accompanist
+ + + 4 , 4-4> + + 4* + + 4- + + + 4' +
4* BURLESON SURRENDERS
TELEPHONE SYSTEMS ♦
4^
4*
+

4* WASHINGTON, 3:50 p. m.— 4«
4* Postmaster General Burleson to- 4*
♦ day Issued an order returning the ♦
4* telephone and telegraph systems 4*
♦ of the country to private owner- ♦
♦ ship, effective immediately.
♦ In a statement accompanying *
♦ the formal order Postmaster 4*
4* General Burleson declared the ♦
+ existing rates would remain in ♦
+ effect and the order forbidding 4*
4* the discharge of employes the 4*
4> discharge of employes because of 4*
♦ union affiliations also would ♦
4* stand.
4«44444444444444
4

NEWSPAPER PUBLISHERS
CONVENTION TOMORROW
The North Idaho Newspaper Assoc
iation will open its annual convention
in Moscow tomorrow. The program,
which will be replete with business
and entertainment of special interest
to newspapermen of the Panhandle, is
being prepared by G. R. Scott, pres
ident of the association. A
publishers are already in Moscow,
having come as delegates to the North
Idaho Chamber of Commerce, and
will remain over for the newspaper
men's meeting. Among those now in
Moscow are G. R. Scott, of the Coeur
d'Alene Evening Press: George
Barker of the Pend O'Reille Review;
A. A. McIntyre of the Kootenai Valley
Times ;
Spirit Lake Herald; J. W. Rohrbeck of
the Stites Enterprise; C. W. King of
Bonners Ferry, and D. W. Greenburg
of the Wallace Daily Press-Times; T.
O. Green. Lewiston Tribune.
R.
Coi. H. C. Shaver, of The
The annual reception of President
and Mrs. Lindley, at Ridenbaugh Hall
next Tuesday night, will be one of
the bier events of commencement
week. No formal invitations will be
issued but a general invitation is ex
tended by President and Mrs. Lindley
to the people of Moscow, the sur
rounding country and neighboring
towns to attend the reception. Last
year there were more Lewiston than
Moscow people in attendance. It is j
will
PRESIDENT'S RECEPTION
NEXT TUESDAY NIGHT
take a deeper interest in the recep
tion this year. They will have an
opportunity to meet men and women
from various parts of the state and it
does not impress visitors from afar
with the loyalty of Moscow to find
few citizens of the home town pres
ent at the university functions.
SO
Board of Regents Monday
The board of regents of the Uni
versity of Idaho will meet in Moscow
next Monday for the purpose of
checking over the work of the year.
This is the only meeting of the year
required to be held in Moscow. Much
business of importance will be before
It is expected that ar
rangements will be made at this
meeting for the completion of the
new w'ing to the administration
building and the erection of other
buildings for which the legislature
made appropriation.
the board.
Genesee Pioneer Dead
John Magee, aged 66 years, died |
Thursday morning at 11 o,clock at
his home at Genesee. Mr. Magee set
tled in the Genesee country in 1878.
He is a brother-in-law of J. J. Keane.
The funeral will occur at 9 o'clock
Saturday morning at the Catholic
church of Genesee.
)
SANDPOINI GETS THE NEXT
XT
The next convention of the North
Idaho Chamber of Commerce will be
held at Sandpoint some time next
summer, the date to be fixed by the
executive committee selected today.
The meetings are to be held
annually instead of semi-annually,
George F. Weeks, of Coeur d'Alene,
is to be the next president of the as-.
sociation and L. F. Parsons, secretary
treasurer. Every county is to have a
member of the executive committee,
who is to be a vice-president.
These are the recommendations of
the committee on nominations ap
pointed by the North Idaho Chamber
of Commerce and they will be accept
ed by the convention, it is believed.
Following are the officers nominated;
by the committee:
President, George F. Weeks, pres
ident of the Coeur d'Alene chamber
of commerce, Coeur d'Alene; secre
tary- treasurer, L. F. Parsons, Mos
owe; vice presidents and members of
the executive committee; Bonner
county, E. D. Farmin, Sandpoint; Ben
ewah, George O'Dwire, St. Maries;
Boundary, F. A. Shultis, Bonners
Ferry; Kootenai, G. R. Scott, Coeur
d'Alene; Shoshone, P. P. Morrow, Wal
lace; Nez Perce, E. N. Ehrhardt, Lew
iston. Lewis, C. W. Felt, Nezperce;
Clearwater, C. D, McEachran, Orofino;
Latah, George Creighton, Moscow.
Last Night's Session
The attendance at the evening ses
sion held last night in the high school
auditorium was light, but much in
terest was shown. Miles Cannon, com
missioner of agriculture; George F.
Weeks, of Coeur d'Alene and George
M. Wilson, president of the Wash
ington Livestock Association were the
speakers. Agricultural subjects and
livestock were discussed.
Today's Meetings
There was a good attendance at the
forenoon session held in the Y. hut
today. A. W. Laird, of Potlatch, Dean
F. G. Miller of the school of forestry
and Major Fenn, in charge of district
No. 1, forestry service in Montana,
were the speakers on the subject of
lumber and timber, which had been
selected for the forenoon program.
Raymond Givens, attorney for the
public utilities commission, spoke on
the railroad and transportation 'situa
tion as affected by the war and J. B.
Eldregde, vice president of the Idaho
Mining Association, spoke on the min
ing industry of Idaho. Lack of space
forbids extended reports of these lec
all of which were of a high
tures
character and full of interesting in
formation.
sequent issues of this paper.
Hasbrook, federal director of employ
ment service, spoke on the labor situ
This will be given in sub
E. H.
ation.
This afternoon's session is also well
attended and there are a number of
splendid speakers on the program. To
night there will be a banquet at the
Guild hall, to which every one is in
DE READY FOR A WEEK
to their latest proposals
That German delegates may not get the answer
before next week is the report from Paris today, which means that 10 days
before the Huns will formally accept or reject
or two weeks will elapse
and decide between peace or further war.
Brussels for two days next week while the
the peace terms
President Wilson will visit
Huns are considering the answers to their notes.
met further reverses and have lost more im
Boishiviki troops have
portant towns.
,ast of Next Week
PARIS.—-It is doubtful if the council of four will be able to send a reply
counter-proposals before the end of next week, according to
thè Paris office of Reuter's limited,
here June 10 for a visit of two days, according to an
mad e here today,
ra ilway centers of Prokurcv and Berdicheft, in
110unced by the Ukrauian Press Bureau,
Answers
to the German
President to Visit Brussels.
BRUSSELS.—(By the Associated Press.)—President Wilson will arrive
official announfement
Bolshevik! Meet Further Reverses.
BERNE, Wednesday.—(By the Associated Press.)—Troops of General
Simon Petlura, anti-bolshevik Ukranian peasant leader, have captured the
western Ukrane, it is an
ID
Conflicting Thoughts
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vited. It will begin at 6:30. There
w , in %
nt This m * ,f te p P rog k ram
esent This will end the ,, ro * ram
a declded success in every „articular,
. .
\ Delegates Register,
j . le , following delegates have reg
1 slace yesterday: ^ S. D. Jones,
^; ^ oesG Hattabadgh, Grange
Y 1 Feterson, X. A. Walsh, C.
9 - Marvin and H. C. Shaver, Spirit
„ -b I!. Eldredge, Boise; David
«S? 1 * ' 1 will ,,9 :l 9f : F. Morrow,
}' a !.. ac ®' 9' ))[' Greenburg, Wallace;
9' Worley and J. C. W hite,
( °£' ur " Aleue.
1 TAXES MUST BE PAID
BEFORE JUNE 23rd
| The last legislature of Idaho has
made a slight change in the laws
governing the
which County
calls to the attention of Latah tax
payers.
The law, Section 120, Chapter 133,
and entered upon the real property
assessment roll shall be received by
the tax , collector on or after the
fourth Monday of June and prior to
the fourth Monday
succeeding year.
And a following section says all
delinquency entries shall be entered
as the f T rst Monday in January.
CITA COUNCIL VOTES
TO EMPLOY BAND MASTER
i - - .
i At, the council meeting Monaay
evening, that body voted to employ
a band master for the ensuing year
at a salary of $75 a month.
An ordinance was given two read
mgs, for the creation of a City De
pository Board of the City of Mos
cow.
payment of taxe«.
Treasurer Iona Adair
of July in the
The official bonds of the city treas
and city clerk were read and
urer
approved.
Reports of the sexton, water com
missioner, street commissioner and
city clerk were read and approved.
A warrant of $5000 was drawn on
the Water Fund, payable to the city
treasurer, for the purpose of paying
for sewer pipe.
The city treasurer was ordered to
pay^all bills properly certified by the
city engineer.
The council adjourned to meet Fri
day, June 6.
*
An Afternoon Wedding.
Rev. J. Quincy Biggs, pastor of the
Christian church, united in marriage
at the home of the bride, at 840 East
Eighth street, Moscow, at 1 o'clock
today, Edward Halverson of Genesee
and Nayva Cay of Moscow. Robert
L. Cay was best man and Miss May
L. Nelson was bridesmaid. Only rel
atives «and a few intimate friends were
present. The young couple will make
their home in Genesee. _
KILLS SEVENTY-EIGHT MEN
Another horror was added to the long list of the year 1919 today whe*
an explosion of black powder in a coal mine at Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania,
killed 78 miners and seriously injured at least 40 more. The accident was
caused by the breaking of the trolley wire on the electric line pulling the
train. The wire ignited the powder.
Terrific Force of Explosion.
WILKESBARRE, Pa., 8:a. m.—-(By the Associated Press.)—Seventy
lo 100 workers were killed and many injured at Baltimore No. 2 tunnel of
the Delaware and Hudson Company near here early today. A car of black
powder attached to a string of cars in which men were riding to the cham
bers in the mines, exploded when the tioliey wire broke and sparks ignited the
powder.
Most of the deaths were caused by smoke and suffocation, identification,
of the bodies is almost impossible. Many are charred beyond recognition.
Limbs of some and heads of others are missing. The death list is rapidly
growing. Many of the injured lived but a short time.
Number of Dead Placed at 78.
WILKESBARRE, 11:20 a- m.—Seventy-eight men lost their lives in Balti
more No. 2 tunnel of the Delaware and Hudson Coal Company explosion and
tire today. Thirty-one are injured, according to the list given out by company
officials at noon today.
Forty-one bodies have been identified and 37 remain unidentified. The
company's injured list is incomplete. It is certain that the total is about 10.
4* EL PASO. Texas.—(By the As
* sociated Press.)—La Patria, a
* leading Mexican newspaper pub
4* lisher here, issued an extra to
i 4* day saying Chihuahua City was
I f taken by Generals Villa and
j 4* Angeles' after only two hours'
4* fighting last Sunday.
j 4- The information is said to have
j 4* come by wire from Laredo, from
4- refugees who had fled from Chi
. 4> huahna City.
; 4* it is said that Villa had ex
4* ecuted eight men upon capturing
4 , 4 , + 44 , + 4 , t , M , + 44 + t l >4
4- VILLA TAKES CHICHÜAHUA
AND EXECUTES CITIZENS
*
4
4- the city.
4•4•4•4•4•4•4•4•4•4•4•♦4•4
'
SPIRIT LAKE SENDS
HEAVY DELEGATION
FOUR DELEGATES FROM LIVE
NORTH IDAHO TOWN WEIGH
NEARLY HALF A TON
Spirit Lake, in the north end of
Kootenai county, sent a delegation of
heavy weights to the convention. The
total weight of the four men is just
short of a half ton or, to be more
exact is, 947 pounds. They are'J. B,
Peterson, secretary of the Commercial
Improvement club, who is the light
weight of the quartet, weighing 467,
C .H. Marvin, the heavy weight at
247. H. C. Shaver and M. A. Walsh,
whose weights are respectively 204
and 237 pounds. The delegation also
claims the honor of having come the
longest distance to attend the meeting.
Their ear is decorated with a Spirit
Lake pennant and they are distribut
ing cards reading; "The most beauti
ful lake in Idaho, Spirit Lake. Spend
your summer vacation there." ,
"Business conditions are good with
us," said Secretary Peterson today.
"The big saw mill is running a double
shift and the Milwaukee railway is
continually adding to the large num
ber of machinists employed in its
shops. The payroll of our industries
exceeds a hundred thousand dollars
per month, which may be considered
pretty good for a town of 1200 people.
Our chief difficulty is in finding hous
accommodations for the people
mg
who are coming and who want to
come. To solve this problem the Spirit
Lake- Home Building company has
been organized with a capital of $50,
000 to build homes and sell to em
ployes who may want to buy them at
actual cost. Local capital is behind
the company. Yes, sir. Sipirit Lake is
the biggest little town in Idaho, it is
a town with no idle men. Every man
has a job and more are wanted."
SAYS POTLATCH DANCES
ARE WELL CONDUCTED
"There is a misunderstanding of
my statement in regard to the evi
dence in the liquor case of Berteloni
being secured at a dance inPotlatch,"
said John Nesbit, prosecuting attor
ney. "The dance at which the evi
dence was secured was not in Pot
latch, but in the country about four
miles distant from the town. So far
have been able to learn the
as we
dances held in Potlatch are under the
auspices of a club, are held at the
gymnasium and are clean, well con
ducted and orderly. No liquor has
ever been discovered at any of these
dances, so far as we know. _ The pub
lished report does an unintentional
injustice to the good people of Pot
latch."
Spokane Couple Married.
Rev. H. O. Perry, pastor of the Meth
odist church, today united in mar
riage William A. Grow of Spokane,
and Eunice G. Spencer of Deer Park.
Spokane county,
performed at the
o'clock.
The ceremony was
at 1
parsonage
The happy couple will spend
month in travel after whicl; they will
make their home in Spokane.
M
Matthews Funeral Tomorrow
The funeral of R. S. Matthews will
Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock
at the Christian church. Rev. Quincy
Biggs will deliver the funeral sermon
and the Masonic lodge will have
charge of the services.
occur
*
+
4*
4*
4
4*
4*
4
PURE FOOD LAWS
4
4
WILL BE ENFORCER
ADULTERATIONS OF FOOD AND
THOSE SERVING FILTH WILL
BE PROSECUTED
*
BOISE.—"IF Food manufactories
are found in an insanitary condition
when the inspector arrives, prose
cution will be prompt and vigorous.
practice giving
abandoned."
This was the announcement made
this morning from the office of the
state department of public welfare
in response to several inquiries touch
ing upon the department's prospec
tive policy.
Two fines already have been paid
following pleas of guilty to the charge
of milk adulteration. J. G. Berry,
manager of the Boise Ice Cream com
pany, was assessed $25.00 and costa
after samples of milk dispensed from
his concern were found to contain
an illegal quantity of sediment. Ray
Dunn, manager of the Edgewooyd
Dairy paid a fine after milk bearing
the Edgewood label also had been,
filth loaded.
A. J. Flack, superintendent of the
pany, this morning was assessed $26
and costs in Judge Anderson's court
after he had pleaded guilty to the
accusation that short weight butter
had been distributed by his concern
Complaint against him was made by
Inspector A. H. Wilson
Barr of the public welfare depart
ment.
"I have no sympathy whatever for
the individual who through careless
ness, negligence or deliberation adul
terates milk which may be served lit
tle children," declared J. K. White,
public welfare commissioner, today.
"There can be no questioning the
fact that such an individual is a se
rious menace to any community. This
department would be seriously deri
lect in its duty if such offenses were
not prosecuted vigorously. Contempt
should be the portion of the man who
sells short weight butter. He is, in
many instances, a petty larcenist of
the most despicable species."
former county
prominent citizen of Sandpoint, is in
jyi oscow for the double purpose of at
tending' the commercial club and of
arranging to send his son to the Uni
versity of Idaho next fall. The boy
graduates from high school next
week and Mr. Pritchard prefers to
send him to the University of Idaho
rather than any other school. After
inspecting the school here and getting
acquainted with Moscow people he has
no hesitancy in deciding that this is
R. G. Pritchard in Moscow
R. G. Pritchard, county assessor,
commissioner
and
the place for his son. Mrs. Pritchard
and the boy will be here soon to ar
range for his entrance in the Univer
sity next fall. Mr. Pritchard and the
editor were intimate friends more
than 25 years ago, but had not met
for nearly 20 years until last night
when they had a pleasant visit to
gether. Mr. Pritchard is in love with
Moscow, which he termed "one of the
prettiest, cleanest and nicest towns I
have seen in a long iime."
(5»,
Hears From Washington.
The Moscow Ministerial association
of which Rev. H. O. Perry is presi
dent has received telegraphic answers
from Congressman French and United
States Senator Nugent in reply to
their telegram urging the Idaho dele
gation to stand firm against the re
peal of war-time prohibition,
affirm that they are unalterably op
posed to it. Senator Borah did not
reply to the message.
Both
G. B. Sayles returned Sunday from
overseas, where he served 10 mohtbs
with the 316th motor transport com
Mr. Sayles was 20 months al
pany
together in the service and was mus
tered out at Camp Russell, Wyom
ing.

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