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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, June 05, 1919, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-06-05/ed-1/seq-2/

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The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
Published every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of the City of
Moscow.
as second-class matter
Entered
Oot. 16, 1911, at the postoffice of
Moscow, Idaho, under the Act of Con
gress of March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Delivered by carrier to any part of
the city:
Per Month .
Three Months
Six Months ...
One Year .
50c
$1.50
2.75
5.00
By Mail
(outside of city and on rural routes:)
Per Month .
Three Months
Six Months .
One Year ...
40c
$1.15
2.25
4 .00
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
f The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled to the use for republication
of all news-dispatches credited to it
or not otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news published
th AH '"'rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also re
served.
WELCOME TO MOSCOW.
Moscow welcomes the visiting mem
bers of the North Idaho Chamber of
Commerce and the publishers of the
northern Idaho newspapers who are
here this week. These men represent
the real live wires of the "Panhandle."
There are very few "drones" in the
commercial clubs of our live western
Cities. The real, live, bustling men,
■who want to advance and want their
communities to advance, form the
membership of these clubs. It is a
pleasure to have such men with us.
We want them to visit the Univer
sity of Idaho, one of the state's great
est assets, where the young men and
young women of our state, receive
higher education that fits them to take
up the work which these visitors will
leave off in a few years. We want
them to go through the university and
•ee every part of it. It will bear in
vestigation. We want them to meet
President Lindley and the members
*of his splendid faculty. They are ex
cellent men and women, doing excel
lent work.
We want the visitors to see and in
spect the big manufacturing plant
where the Idaho National Harvester,
used wherever wheat is grown, is
made and where many other articles
of use in this and other states, are
manufactured.
We want the visitors to inspect the
big packing plant of the Hagan
Cushing Company. Moscow is proud
of this plant. It is an asset to the
city, the surrounding country and to
northern Idaho. We want the vis
itors to see our homes. Moscow has
many fine homes, beautiful yards and
splendid streets. We want them to
take home with them a good impres
sion of Moscow and to tell their
friends and neighbors what kind of a
town the state's greatest educational
institution has for its home and we
want them to come again.
to to to
GOOD CITIENSHIP.
Good citizens try to uphold the
law and seek to have violators of the
law punished. Courts have been es
tablished for this purpose and punish
ments have been provided for various
offenses against the law and the com
mon-wealth. A mode of procedure has
been arranged and defined for such
matters. If a good man or won,an
knows of the violation of the law he
or she will report the matter to the of
ficers charged with the enforcement
of the law. He or she can, may and
should swear to a complaint against
the offender and have a warrant is
>r.
•v.
sued for his arrest. The matter is ta
ken into the courts and the facts ascer
tained. This is the rule of procedure
adopted in all well regulated commun
ities and the rule followed by really
good citizens. The courts are provid
ed for the express purpose of punish
ing the wrong doer and the mode of
procedure is easy and simple.
Newspapers are for the upbuilding
of the community and the reporting
of local and foreign news. Newspa
pers report the doing of the home
folks and the groat events of the
■world. They are not provided for the
purpose of punishing violators of law.
but to report the facts and especially
the facts brought out in court trials.
Some people seem to have become
mixed in their ideas of the function
3f the courts and the press. They
seem to think it is the province of the
lewspapers to punish the guilty by
loiding them up to ridicule and deri
sion. They are mistaken in this. If
:he really good citizen knows of a vio
ation of the law he will report it to
be officers and have the guilty per
son punished. Really good citizens
lo not want to try criminal cases in
he newspapers. They take their evi
lence to the courts. Moscow has many
eally good citizens and it has some
■ot so good. AI! towns have both
iasses.
Cable dispatches tell us that Gus
•e Noske in charge of the military
1 ' , , ' . ,
epartment of what is left of Germany,
"ecently visited all coast defense posi
x
«
IS GERMANY BLUFFING?
lions and urged the officers and men
in charge to be "prepared for emerg
encies." This would indicate that Ger
many plans to offer resistance to the
enforcement of the peace terms.
It hardly seems likely that Germany,
after being defeated in the field would'
again attempt a passage at arms with
the allied nations, but it did not seem
possible that Germany would under
take to conquer the world or that she
would come as nearly succeeding as
she did. It is not safe to predict what
Germany will or will not do. It will
be unwise to give her any chance to
start anything.
That General Foch and other mil-1
itary leaders believe that Germany is
practically powerless to resist or to
start another war, is evidenced by the !
i
j
j f ac ' that American troops are con
I stantly being sent home and that no
| a
(danger of Germany again trying arm-J
; ed resistance those in charge would
a ot be lessening their vigilance. It
ba /hat Germany is bluffing and
is planning to carry her bluff just ns
far as she possibly can without a( „
itmilly engaging in real warfare.
Surely Germany has had enough of
fighting and must know what would
happen to her if war were to be re
. . . . ,, ...
clarm seems to be felt among military
men. Surely if there was any real
sumed.
to,.
IS STILL A GERMAN.
It is reported that a prominent Ger
man citizen of the Genesee neighbor
hood, who was in town yesterday,
when discussing the peace terms,
showed that he is still a German at
heart. He is reported to have declar
ed that if he were in Germany he
would "fight until they killed me be
fore I would submit to become a
slave as the United States and Eng
land and France are trying to make
slaves of the German people." Such
a man, believing as he says he be
lieves, is not an American. He is just
as much of a German as Kaiser Bill.
Von Hindenberg and Ludendorff. It
is well there
and that most of the former Germans
in this country are really good, Amer
ican citizens.
to to to
David Starr Jordan, who has the un
happy faculty of doing the wrong
thing at the wrong time, again breaks
into the newspapers with a statement
that tlie kaiser should not be punish
ed, but should be ignored,
might take better with the American
people if they could forget how Jor
dan went about the country pleading
and begging for America to not enter
the war and opposed any resistance by
the United States to Germany's ef
forts to conquer the world, when it
has since been shown that had not
the United States entered the war
when she did, Germany would have
succeeded. David Starr Jordan is a
great speaker but he would do well to
confine his talks and advice to other
subjects than how to deal with the
former kaiser and with the German
people.
This
Many a Man
Gets up tired on a morning because
his system is being poisoned by let
ting the effete matter accumulate in
his system. Take M. A. C., which
never fails to expel the poison from
your system and stops auto-intoxi
cation. For sale by the Corner Drug
Store.
.to.
Latah Comity Records.
Monday, June 2, 1919.
R. M.—Sven W. Tideman to Math
ias Kanibitsch. $9000, lots 6 and 7; EV 2
SWV4 6-37-4W.
W. D.— L. E. Gilmore to A. A. Mc
Donald. $16,000; W%SW% 15; Wy 2
NW% 22-42-5W.
Q. C. D.—Same to same, $1; E%
NW% 22-42-6W.
Gilmore. $9000; W%SW% 15; W'/ 2
NW% 22-42-5W.
W. D.—A. Wilmot to Dottie J. Stan
ton, $600; lot 2-12 Kendrick,
Appt.—Emmett J. Gemmill appoints
R. P. Drury, Deputy Assessor.
Rel.— B. T. Byrns to Pheobe E.
Spencer, r-m 7-1-08.
Rel.— R. H. Hall to J. E. Wren, r-m
4-1-16.
Kel.—Same to W. J. De Partee, r-m
2-5-18.
R. M.— W. J. De Partee to The Farm
ers' Bank, Kendrick, $650; 18
rom. nt SW cor of SB%SWÎ4 23-38-3.
R. M.— G. S. Porter to Kendrick
State Bank. $1000; Lots 7-8; W 1-3
of 6 "A" Kendrick.
Army Discharge—John C. Reeder.
A.
to
Cut This Out and Take it With You
A man often forgets the exact
name of the article he wishes to pur
chase, and as a last resort take
something else instead. That is al
ways disappointing and unsatisfac
tory. The safe way is to cut this out
and take it with you so as to make sure
of getting Chamberlain's Tablets,
You will find nothing quite so satis
factory for constipation and indiges
tion (J)
Something in This?
Recent clerical utterances against :
Sunday amusements raise the ques- !
tion of whether a clergyman, with six ;
day's for outdoor recreation, is the one ■
best qualified to pass on a Sabbath !
schedule of toilers who work from ;
sun to sun six day's a week.^—New ;
York HeraU.
-—to._
For the Relief of Rheumatic Pains ,
When you have stiffness and sore- 1
ness of the muscles, aching joints and .
^* nd 't difficult to move without pain j
try massaging the affected parts with I
Chamberlain « Liniment It will re -:
Heve the pain and make rest and
sleep possible. (J)
|
j
RED CROSS AIDS
EXILED GREEKS
Aegean Islands Are Thronged
With Fugitives From Asia
Minor Towns.
NEARLY ALL ARE IN RAGS
Cheering Crowds at Mytilene Take
Horses From Red Cross Carriage
and Draw It to Residence of
Governor General.
navy,
been assigned for transporting person
and supplies.
O" the ,"5 ^ ilcne / re 52 '™>
■ ' ' d tbere from Asia
; M'"« fly. years ago Red Cross work
ers are regularly visiting all the towns
, und clothlnf , has been glven t0 about
j 20,000 of the refugees,
At the outbreak of the war, In 1914,
there were 3,000,000 in Asia Minor.
More than 500,000 escaped to the
islands in the Aegean. Thousands
Athens.—In its work in the Greek
i slands the American Red Cross has
! the co-operation of the United States
Six submarine chasers have
were massacred. Armed bands of
Turks roamed the countryside, plun
dering and murdering Greeks wherever
found. The others, driven out of their
homes and sent inland, are now return
ing, to find their homes either destroy
ed or occupied by Turks.
Allowed Six Cents a Day.'
The refugees in the Aegean islands
intend to return to Asia Minor as soon
ns conditions permit. At present the
Greek government gives each refugee
six cents a day.
The Red Cross is devoting much at
tention to the prevention of further
epidemics, such ns the typhus scourge,
which took such a heavy toll at Myti
lene. ■
Food Is scanty and costly, and most
of the refugees are underfed, even In
the large towns. Nearly ail are in
rags. The hospitals are short of medi
cines and other supplies, and have
been crowded by influenza cases.
Clothing, blankets and medicine are*
needed on all the islands. Canned
meat for broth is wanted in the hos
pitals. American women run the
worshops where clothing is made on
the three islands of Mytilene, Chios
and SnifiosT '
22,000 In Town of Mytilene.
Of the 52,000 refugees on Mytilene
22,(X)0 are in the towr of Mytilene and
Its suburbs ; the others are scattered
about in 62 villages.
Of the 20,000 refugees on Crios part
are sheltered in old houses and the
rest in wooden barracks, divided with
bagging and old carpets into "rooms,"
each accommodating a family of from
five to ten persons.
The islands of Lemnos, Imbros, Ten
edos and Samothrace are served with
Red Cross supplies from Mytilene; Oin
ousa is served from Chios, and Ilcanla
from Samos.
The American Red Cross agents
were received at Mytilene with ' the
greatest enthusiasm. The horses were
unhitched and the carriage drawn by a
cheering crowd to the residence of the
governor general, who commandeered
a private home and placed it at their
disposal.
INDIAN IS FINE SOLDIER
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£ *9
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sir i
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Private Pontiac Williams, One Hun
dred and Twenty-fifth infantry, is a
full-blooded Ottawu#4ndian. He was
b '* nl !!t Hart. Mich., and educated lu
'he Indian school at Mount Pleasant.
He was in all the battles of the One
Hundred and Twenty-fifth, except Sois
sons. He was wounded at Cliateau
i lli( . rry and was gjven the D . s . c ,
0| . gallant conduct.
**** + *****+*** + *
MARKETS ♦
+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
The following market quotations
by the dealer and are changed daily,
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of grain, ;
produce and meats. !
are the prices paid to the producer !
Hav and Grain i
Wheat. Marquis, bulk....!.$2.15 I
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net. delivered to warehoused. 2.151
Wheat Bluestem No. 1, sacked
net. delivered to warehouses.. 2.20 I
wheal Fcrtyfold, No. 1, bulk !
net. delivered to warehouses.. 2.15 !
Vv neat, Fortyfold, No. 1. s'k'd
net, delivered to warehouses.. 2.20 ,
Wheat. White Club, No. 1. bulk !
net, delivered to warehouses.. 2.15 i
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, s'k'd
net. delivered to warehouses.. 2.20 i
Wheat Red Russian. No. 1. blk
net, delivered to whses... [email protected]
Wheat Red
+
net, del. to whses.2.06%@2.15
1 Feed Oats, sacked, per
cwt. net. Delivered to ware
No h °l Timoihy ' Hay,' per' ton ! !. f Soo
White Beans, per pound
No.
5c
Produce.
Eggs, per dozen
Butter, creamery, per pound.G3c
.50c
....75c
[email protected]
[email protected]
. [email protected]
Butter, ranch, per pound
Potatoes, per cwt.
Young chickens, per lb.
Hens, live wt.
Old Roosters, per lb ...
Hogs, live wt., light, lb.. 18 Vè @19 Vèc
Hogs, live wt., heavy, lb. 16%@17%
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb., [email protected]
H ogs, dressed, light, per lb.. [email protected]
Veal, live wt., per [email protected]
Veal, dressed, per [email protected]
Spring lambs, per [email protected]
Mutton, lier lb.
8c
-—-=
Notice of Intention to Issue and Sell,;
Highway Dlstrlet Number Two, La- ■
tali Comity, Idaho, Bonds, in the ■
Amount of $100,000.00 and Inviting
Bidders Therefor. 1
Notice is hereby given that the 1
Board of Commissioners of Highway I
District Number Two, Latah County, |
Idaho, intends to issue, negotiate and i
sell Highway District Number Two, I
Latah County, Idaho, bonds in the ag- j
gregate amount of $100,000.00 of the j
denomination of $500.00 each; said |
bonds to bear interest at a rate not to ;
exceed 6 per cent per annum, pay- j
able semi-annually on the first day ;
Z
o
J
J
PRIDE
s
This bank has a par
donable pride in its or
g a n i z a t i o n, in its
strength, in its service
and in its growth.
UJ
z
o
You have a like pride
in your business and
your success. -
0 *
Cd
>
Let us get together for
mutual benefit.
o
FIRST TRUSTS
c n
H
CO
o
Security and Better
Service
Cd
Û
Monuments
GEO. H. MOODY,
Moscow, Idaho
wishes to announce to those
who are going to have monu
ments erected before Decora
tion Day
To place their orders as early
as convenient in order to get
their work and avoid any de
lay. My stock of monuments is
very complete at this time and
at the most reasonable prices.
We also carve U. S. Service
Emblems for soldiers. Would
invite to call at store
and select the work you wish
to purchase.
M
X
Hotel Moscow
TOM WRIGHT. Prop.
Thoroughly Modern
FIRST CLASS GRILL
AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS
JL
±
1
J.
t
i * *
Highway District Number Two, La
tali County. State of Idaho, at a meet
mg thereof to be held in the office
9/ Secretary of the District, New
Creighton Block, Idaho, on .June 20,
a *" ' o clock P. M.
Bids must name the best terms at
which bidders will purchase said
bonds - No bid will be considered for
less than par value of said bonds.
t w - itb a^nmd interest ad de(E thereto
to date of delivery.
be unqualified and un
? f Jai uary ? i T* y ? ar: t0
b f. date ^ Jl ' ly ,V ^19 and to become
du ? and payable '» their numerical
° ld ? r 111 ten equa annual installments
bagmning July 1. .1930, and ending
,uly 1939 hut optional after July
\ 1929 -, B ° th , p, " 1< L lpal and mt f r< : st
°* said bo f nds ahaU be Payable at th e
° f . fiPe . ot * he Treasurer of said Dis
Î!; ict " ™ osc ° w ' da . ho - or at th ®
lase ^aüonal Bank, in the City and
f„ tate of /ew York at the option of
th ® Purchaser.
Sealed blds f , or said bonds will be
| received, opened and considered by the
'Board ot Highway Commissioners of
! PROFESSIONAL CARDS
1
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
' DR. JOHN W. STEVENSON—Eye
Ear, Nose and Throat. Glasses
Fitted. Office, New Creighton Bldg.,
corner Third and Main. Phone 177.
;-
DR. F. M. LEITCH—Physician, Com
mercial Bldg. Phone 223Y.
c;j)r
Creighton Blk
W. A. ADAIR
Physician,
Phone 85.
OSTEOPATH
DR. VV. M. HATFIELD—Osteopath,
Creighton Bldg. Phone 48.
p B. J. A. McDANIEL, Dentist, First
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phone 229.
-- - ~ -
MORGAN & BOOM—Attorneys, Ur
quhart Bldg. Phone 76.
-
A

DENTISTS
LAWYERS
H. OVERSMITH — Atttorney-at
Law, Urquhart Bldg. Phone 208.
ORLAND & LEE
Attorneys-at-Law,
First Natl. Bank Bldg. Phones Or
I land 104. Lee 104L.
! GUY W. WOLFE—Attorney. 110 East
Second St. Phone 17R.
JOHN NISBET—Attorney-at-law, 1st
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phone 131 J.
IMPROVEMENT PARLOR
MARIE SHANNON.—Rooms 18 and
19 Urquhart Bldg. Phone 122J.
! Shampooing, massage and manicur
; ing. _ _
PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER
CREEKMUR'S BUSINESS COL
' ' LEGE—Phone 106L or 147L. '
I
TAXI CAB
FOR THE BESff TAXI SERVICE—
j Phone 300. _ _
NEELY & SON — PHONE
at the old prices
51
:
ARCHITECTS
C. RICHARDSON, ARCHITECT—
Skattaboe Blk., phone 200.
Woodworking anj Cabinet-Maker
H. O. FIELD—Ph. 122L. 107 S. Wash.
VETERINARY
DR. E, T. BAKER, VETERINARIAN.
Sixth and Washington. Phone 243.
DR. J. D. ADAMS—Veterinarian. Dr.
J. S. Thompson in charge. Phone
121-L.
AUCTIONEER
CHAS. E. WALKS—Auctioneer, Urqu
hart Blgd. Phone 278.
CREAMERY
MOSCOW CREAMERY—57 cents
paid for butter fat. Ice cream, bulk
and brick in cold storage.
DRAY LINES
MOSCOW TRANSFER CO.—Craig
and Metlock. Agents Continental
Oil Company. Phone 19R.
HUNTING, KALSOMINING, PAPER
HANGING AND SIGNS
PHONE 34-J.
CALL 137J for Paper Hanging, Cal
cimining. Painting. Estimates free.
MAKER OF CLOTHES FOR THE
MAN WHO KNOWS
Order Now
O. H. SCHWARZ
TAILOR
HEADQUARTERS FOR NO. 1
HARNESS
SHOES
Full line of TRUNKS and
SUIT CASES
go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Loans
Thompson insurance Agency
Fire Insurance. Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerhoiz, Prop.
Moscow. Idaho.
conditional. Each bid must be ac
companied by a cheek for 10 per cent
of the amount of bonds to be sold,
payable to the Secretary of the Dis
trict, and certified by a bank in Mos
cow, Idaho. Said bid check must be
free from all restrictive endorsements
and conditions.
Approving legal opinion of Messrs.
Wood & Oakley, Chicago, Illinois, will
be furnished purchaser of bonds.
The Board reserves the right to re
ject any and all bids.
Dated at Moscow, Latah County, Ida
ho. this 31st day of May, A. D. 1919,
by Vnder of the Board of Highway
Commissioners, Highway District
Number Two, Latah County. Idaho.
SCOTT OGDEN,
Secretary.
210-11 -.12-19-20-21
CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP WANTED—Femak ;
WANTED—GIRL TO TAKE CARE OP
Phone
212tf
children, go borne
268L.
night.
Mrs. E. J. Rosenburg.
WANTED — A COOK FOR THE
Apply at
212-7
coming school year,
once. Phone 172.
WANTED—A GIRL OR WOMAN
for general housework,
dren. Write H. L. C.,
Ida., Et. 1, Box 31.
No chil
Kendrick,
212-3
GIRL WANTED AT HOTEL IDAHO.
_ 207tf
WANTED—A GIRL FOR GENERAL
house work,
phone 62J.
Mrs. Geo. Weber,
196-tf
HELP WANTED—Male
WANTED—6 MEN AND 6 TEAMS
to work on highway Dist. No. 2 See
S. E. Monahan, Room 18, Creighiam
Bldg.
212
FOR RENT—Rooms
FOR RENT — TWO FURNISHED
rooms, bath and kitchenett, first
floor. Private entrance. 210 First
209tf
st.
FOR RENT
TWO FURNISHED
rooms, south front. Phone 144J.
201fcf
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms. Private
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms at
Eggans apartments. Phone 205H.
231-tf
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT—A LARGE MODERN
house, furnished, corner Deakin and
University Ave. Phone 172.
212-7
FOR RENT—5-ROOM MODERN COT
tage also partly furnished house
close in. Phone 317J. 209-15
FOR .RENT.—AN EIGHT ROOM
modern house, on Deakin Ave., east
of dormitory. Phone 170J
83-tf
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR SALE — 380-ACRE FARM AT
station, nearly all in crop, 200 acres
meadow land, all tractor land, fine
buildings, part crop goes to buyer at
$100 per acre, easy terms. See E. E.
Ostroot, Phone 19J office over Mos
212-4
cow Hardware Store.
FOR SALE
400-ACRE FARM, EIGHT
miles from .Moscow, new buildings,
330 acres in crop. 100
wheat, 1-3 crop to buyer,
per acre. Terms.
fall
acres
Price $100
See E. E. Ostroot.
212-4
MUST SELL—MAKE OFFER. MQ^
ern 7-room house, bath, gara"',
bam, fruit, large corner fine location.
Clear, save commission. Owner, A. S.
Lacey, 116 Lake St., Oakland, Calif.
212-8
FOR EXCHANGE—GOOD 8-ROOM
house and acre of ground, not far
out, for good house, close in. Call
us. Metropolitan Investment Co.
212-14 /•
FOR SALE—FIVE ACRES WELL
improved, outside city limits, one
block from University; modern house,
fine fruit, good garden. Address P.
O. Box 277, Moscow.
212-24
home, two acres, reasonable. Will
take late model ear in part payment.
Mdress Box 136. Phone 290R, J7Stf
FOR SALE—Lire Stock
FOR SALE — TWO-MONTH-OLD
pigs and two young brood sows. M.
S. Mickey.
SOME A1 DRAFT TEAMS WELL
matched. Absolutely sound, either
mare or geldings. Call 9251. James
180-tf
209-6
H. Dye, Box 308.
FOR SALE—24 .HEAD OF SHEEP.
A. E. Alexander, R. F. D. 2, Moscow.
179tf
Phone 942K5.
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE—LATE '17 FORD TOUR
ing car. Both car anad tires in A-l
condition. M. B. Dallas, Albright's
Garage. _212-4
FOR SALE—A THRESHING OUT
Also bailer.
Phone 98X2. E. L. Cole, three miles
202-13
fit for sale cheap.
northeast of Moscow.
MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED TO BUY A GOOD PIANO.
Must be a good make and in good
212ff
WANTED—A REVOLVER IN FIRST
class condition. Phone 276R. 212-3
condition. Phone 177H
FOR SALE—350 YARDS OF BLACK
soil. Phone 266W. A. R. Stanley.
204-13
LOST
LOST—CRANK FOR OVERLAND
car on North Main street, Friday.
212-3
Leave at Star-Mirror.
LOST—BRACLET WATCH ON 3D
and Main Sts. Reward. Leave at
212-3
Star-Mirror.

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