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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, June 10, 1919, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-06-10/ed-1/seq-3/

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'WHERE EVERYBODY GOES"
LAST TIME TONIGHT
DUSTIN
FARNUM
I
In
THE LIGHT OF
u
WESTERN STARS
y?
By Zane Grey
11c
25c
WEDNESDAY ONLY
MAE
ALLISON
ill
"HER INSPIRATION"
A Kentucky Romance
i
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
in
V
u
A RAINBOW TRAIL
Sequel to "Riders of the Purple Sage"
LONG
is coming with
MARY PICKFORD
DADDY
LEGS
hi
A
s
Weather—Tonight and Wednesday,
fair, except probably showers in the
southeast; c;ooler in the southeast
tonight; light frosts in the early morn
ing in exposed places.
Wm. Hall, '06 of the University,
now with the Hall Lumber Co., of
Butte, Mont., is in the city for com
mencement.
W. J. Williams of Tonopah, Nevada,
is visiting his daughter, Mrs. Clyde
Hall.
»
W. C. Langroise and wife and
daughter of Emmetf, Idaho, are at
tending the cmmencement exercises of
the University.
Erick ^lleT and S. E. Keeder of
Troy were in the city Monday.
Commencement, take notice—Your
friends can buy anything you can give
them except your photo. Eggan, Pho
tographer, East Third.
R. M. Walker of Wallace and Evan
Evans and I. M. Atwood of Grange
ville were arrivals yesterday in the
city.
212-20
t
John Lienhard* of Princeton, and
Bay Clark of Potlatch were in Mos
cow today.
E. Carlson of Palouse is a Mos
cow visitor today.
Mrs. Melcher of Spokane, is in the
city today, visiting at the home of
her uncle, J. Dunbar.
Pren Moore returned Sunday from
southern Idaho, where he has been
since May 6 in the extension work
of the federal government, for the
department of animal industry. He
leaves Friday for the northern part
of the state.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Sievers, Albin
Johnson and A. S. Olson motored to
Spokane today to attend the farm
ers convention.
Seed beans, strictly "Little Navy"
for sale at 8c per pound. Moscow
Hardware Co. 196-tf
Mrs. Wilson Brown left for Spokane
today after a short visit with Mrs. O.
McCartor. Miss Ernestine Brown ac
companied her mother hme.
C. A. Christenson, northeast of Mos
cow left today for Salmon River on
business.
M. B. Dallas was a passenger to
Spokane today.
Mrs. Jack . Kimbel of Ritzville,
Wash., is a visitor in Moscow today.
E. O. Cathcart of Harrison was in
the city today.
A
fir
1
daughter, left Sunday for their home.
Mrs. C. A. Smith's parents, Mr.
and Mrs. James Jennings, of St. John, I
Wash., who have been visiting their
DISQUIET SEEN
AMONG SLOVAKS!
Honeymoon of Revolution Passes
and Disillusion Comes
Upon Them.
THREE ELEMENTS IN NATION
New Government So Far Has Recog
nized but One of Them in Rule
—Magyars and the Peas
ants Are Ignored.
Pressburg, Slovakia, Bohemia.—Gen
orally speaking, the situation in Slo
vakia, formerly a province of Hun
gary, now annexed to Czecho-Slovakia,
is not without disquieting features.
The honeymoon of the revolution has
passed and some of the disillusionment
bound to follow the introduction of a
new regime has set in. The Magyars
and the Magyarized elements have not
as yet been reconciled» to the new re
•"•ne. and the peasants have recovered
from their first enthusiasm. A difficult
task of reconciliation remains to be
performed by the Czechs.
The population of Slovakia Is made
up of three elements—Slovak Intel I i
gencia, which has always been very
■strong for the union with Bohemia;
the Magyars and Magyarized Germans,
and the peasantry. The intelligence
has been completely satisfied by the
Czeeho-Slovak government. The ad
ministration has been handed over
completely to the very small number
of Slovak doctors, lawyers, authors
and professors that could be mustered
for service.
Magyars Ignored.
Meanwhile the Magyars and Mag
yarized elements have been quite ig
nored by the government except where
the government could not find a Slovak
t
to fill the job. Intense loyalty to the
old Hungarian rule characterizes these
people. They could be reconciled to ]
new conditions were they taken into !
the Czech administration. But the
government at present prefers to fill
the vacancies left by the Slovak intel
ligencia with officials from Bohemia
and Moravia. This naturally angers
both tjie Magyarized element and those
Slovaks who are Unfit but would like
to occupy ail the jobs.
A decided sentiment for real local
autonomy is making itself felt. On
the whole, the government may not be
opposed to granting tin outspoken de
mand for home rule in the province.
The peasants do not take much inter
est in theoretical politics. They com
plain that the republic lasted only
three days. By this they mean that
they were allowed to plunder the Jews
for only three days in the interval be
tween the withdrawal of the Hungar
ians and the arrival of the Czechs.
During this time the peasants had
a very free hand. There were very
few towns or villages where they did
not completely clean up the Jewish
population, who are the shopkeepers
and small traders, and at times les
sors of estates. Now the peasants have
no longer the Jews to plunder their
interest in the new state has dimin
ished. They were kept in a state of
Illiteracy by the Hungarians and
therefore are by no means ripe for
real self-government. However, just
now they are very bitter because they
claim the Czechs take their food sup
plies away.
Bolshevism Not Popular.
Bolshevism has not taken a great
Slovakia is
frip on the peasantry.
laVgely an agricultural district and we
know farmers are always the most
conservative element. In the few in
dustrial communities in the more
north and east a certain
a
amount of unrest has developed. In
Kassav, far eastward, the large mills
are not working and the food situation
Is very bad, as it is in most of the in
dustrial districts,
hold meetings and growl in bolshevik
tone. Naturally Kassav is rather near
the Hungarian border,
shevism there would be natural,
the other industrial districts the work
to have taken out their
Here the workmen
So that bol
In
men seem
class-consciiusness in making big de
mands upon their employers. Not un
usual was it for workmen to come to
their employers and demand that they
receive a percentage of ail profits ac
crued since the war's beginning. With
all this discontent the food situation
Is very much involved. The mountain
ous, which happen to be the industrial,
districts are mostly very short of food
and clothes. Many factories where
leather and other products of the land
used function part time, but the
men have not enough to keep them
selves and their families in food. In
localities there are not even
are
some
enough potatoes. Hence, as in some
districts of Bohemia, the trend is to
ward bolshevism.
Generally speaking, Slovakia would
not be the first province to go up in
For the time being
anarchic flames,
the bolshevik overturn in Hungaria
has had indeed a rather quieting ef
The wealthy or
feet on Slovakia,
well to do who were most attached
to their old fatherland now do not
relish the idea of returning tor a Hun
gary which will take all their property.
Now They're Married.
San Francisco.—"I have loved your
dear eyes—" ran a letter John Metz
ner dictated to his stenographer, Miss
Rivers. "Who's It going to?" she asked.
"Address It to yourself," said John,
Now they nre m ., rr i e fi.
.
i
«
get the
vital
mineral
salts
in your dish of
4
ou
7
v
-
i
a rooo
(jrape-^uts
ttiose organic
v elements of tTie
field grains,-those
valuable phosphates
so essential to the
building and upkeep
of health at every
There s a Reason

j
>
CITY NEWS IN BRIEF
Rev. Warner, former pastor of the
Moscow Methdist
through the city today on his way to
Kendrick to assist in the Centenary
work.
church
passed
Mrs. E. W. Beimfohr and children,
*"5"» and ^ C fP er f San Jose
hf " arrlved today to visit Mrs.
Deimlchr s parents, Mr. and Mrs.
James Fogle. Mr. Beimfohr arrived
Sunday,
Oscar Burklund of Deary is a vis
itor in the city.
Before selling your Hogs, Cattle,
Veal or Mutton, call phone 7 and get
our price. Hagan and Cushing Co.
152-tf
The funeral of Elmer Oliver Torge
son, who was killed at Elk River by
a falling tree on June 7, occurred in
Moscow today at 3 o'clock at Grice's
chapel. He was 35 years of age and
leaves a wife and three children.
The services were conducted by Rev.
Oslund.
At Davids is a boy scout window of
unusual interest. It shows some of
. The Pine Grove people will hold the
pieTic as announced on Thursday.
All are invited.
Mr. and Mrs. B. M. Schick of Pa
louse were visitors in the city today.
A. A. McIntyre and Wm. Gale of
Bonners Ferry were in Moscow Mon
day.
the useful things handicrafts required
of the boy scouts. There is the study
of the forest trees, the building of
bridges and shelters, the tying of va
rious kinds of knots, etc.
A. B. Mclntire is moving to Clarks
ton, on account of Mrs. Mclntire's
health.
The family have lived in
Moscow for 19 years. Mr. Mclntire
has bought 2Vz acres with fruit trees,
making a well improved home there.
He drove to Clarkston by car today
and will move his household goods in
few days.
IBs
*<
, ~ " *■ V
a
»
»♦< Mexicans Think Rebel
Chief Burst His Coffin S
—• S
s
ft

>

ft
ft Chautla, Mexico.—Legends al
►J ready are beginning to spring up £
'«J among the superstitious and ig- $
►*< nornnt regarding Emillano Zap- j£<
$ ata, the rebel chief who met >♦,
£ death here on April 10. In an
ft attempt to preserve t[io bandit's ►*<
body as long as possible to give ft
the greatest number of his fol- £<
ft lowers a chance to see it, it ,♦<
►*< was packed in ice, in the ab- £*?
ft sence of embalming fluids. The >♦,
►J ice burst the sides and top of ft
>♦< the flimsy coffin and gave rise ►*<
ft< to superstitious tales that the ft
►♦< "Attila of the South," as Zap- £<
ft ata was called, was not really $
£< dead, hut had burst his coffin [ft
ft and escaped. A
►J „„ Sj
MAKES HIM POSE AS GUEST
San Francisco Husband Gets Tired
of Notions of Artistic
Wife.
San Francisco.—Because his wife
believed she was destined to be a
prima donna and made him pose as a
guest In his own home, Jacob Flower
man, Insurance man, was granted a
divorce hero.
Flowerman said his wife contended
a singer to be popular must be single.
Therefore they lived together secret
ly. When guests came he said he
went out the back way and later was
admitted at the front door like any
other guest.
Finally, he says, he got tired of this
deception and sent his wife buck Eu '
CAREY SILVER SAFELY
Trains Cross Continent Without
Loss of an Ounce,
>
Mint Director Revealed How War-Time
Shipments to India Were
Handled.
Washington.—Now that the govern
ment has completed its war-time ship
ments to India of silver from melted
dollars. Director of tile Mint Baker
has disclosed how thousands of tons
of the metal were hauled from the
Philadelphia mint to San Francisco in
special trains, guarded by armed men,
without loss of an ounce and without
general knowledge of the procedure.
Eighteen of these treasure trains
made the trip across the continent in
the 12 months ending last April 23,
with the silver like big bricks piled
high in each of the five express cars
composing a special train.
Two men with automatic pistols at
their hips and sawed-off shotguns on
their laps sat in each car, and later
guarded the secret transfer of the
white bars from train to ship at San
Francisco.
Each silver brick weighed about 62
pounds and was worth $1,000, and each
train carried between $5,000,000 and
$10,000,000 of the bricks. Wrecking
| of the trains and theft of the metal
by bandits was considered an ever
present menace to he guarded against.
Guarded shipments of silver dollars
also were made from the United States
treasury in Washington and from
the New Orleans subtreasury in Phila
delphia. These dollars traveled in
stout bags of 1,000 each and were
handled much like bags of sugar, ex
cept that armed men always .were
near.
More than 265,000,000 silver dollars
were melted and shipped to India dur
ing the yearj to meet urge nt war de
niands for coinage,
---—.
DOGS AND HENS ARE WISER
I Physician Arraigns the Modern Prac
tice of Treating Influenza ^
Patients.
New Orleans, La.—"When a dog
gets sick, what's the first thing he
does? He sticks his nose between his
hind legs. What does he do it for?
So that he can breathe the warm air.
When a chicken getp sick, the first
thing it does is to tuck its head under
its wing—so that it can breathe the
warm air. Physicians who advocate
the cold-air treatment for the 'flu'
have less sense than either dogs or
chickens."
Such is the opinion rendered by Dr.
Cooper Holtzelaw of Chattanooga,
formerly president of the Association
of Surgeons of the Southern Railway.
He said it before the hundreds of sur
geons who attended the twenty-third
annual meeting of the association,
held in this city.
He was arraigning the modern prac
tice of treating influenza patients in
the open air.
best treatment for influenza is to keep
the patient under such conditions of
care and freedom from exposure as
were wont to obtain when our moth
ers of the old school used to treat the
measles.
1
He insisted that the
Wrestling Regains Speech.
Atlanta, Ga.—Private Rickenbacker
of Orangeburg, S. C., who was made
practically dumb by a shell explosion
on a battlefield in France, rep;:
lii*= speech the other day dui
wrestling match at Camp Gordo'
opponent got a tight grip
Hickenhacker's chest and ti
i-d out in pain. His frier
been talking nn<
m
CL! NGÎNG A
! N V SSI B LE
—%
7
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■T J v.
7 "\
3 ?
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3
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a
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1
I
FACE POWDER.
II
onteel
50 c
Perfumed with the Costly New öder of 26 Flowers
OESN'T blow or brush off the face, but
sticlcs closely, giving a dainty "bloom", far
different from that chalky "make-up" look of
inferior powders. Doubly delightful with its rich
Jonteel fragrance. Try a box today.
CJ
D
THE OWL DRUG STORE
S. L. WILLIS, Proprietor
BULLETIN
C. II. PATTEN, Manager
Moscow, Idaho.
Room 20, Urquhart- Building
Phone 110
FARM LANDS
No. 1—160 acres, all under cultivation, 5 miles from Moscow, good
buildings, good water, good soil, lays well. Cheap at $16,000.
No, 2—100 acres, nearly all under plow, fair buildings, close to station.
A snap at $10,000. Terms to suit.
No. 3—160 acres, close to town, 90 acres cultivated, 50 in timothy., 50
for fall wheat, balance nearly all good with little clearing, lots
of water, great for grass, ideal dairy and wheat farm. Priced
clear at $10,000. Will take a good Moscow house on this and give
all time wanted on balance.
No. 4—160 acres close in, 140 acres cultivated, water piped in buildings,
good house, large barn, good soil, some crop goes. A bargain at
$16,000, half cash, balance 6 per cent.
MOSCOW ACRE TRACTS
No. 5—3 acres, close in, good buildings, water, fruit and shade trees,
nice place. $2500. Terms. Will take 80 acres in deal.
No. 6—2 acres at city limits, small 5-room house, all level land. Sacri
fice sale account sickness. $750, terms easy. -
No. 7—2 acres, fine^ level land, near above with 5-room bungalow,
electric lights, good well, barn. Easy terms, $1300.
No. 8—20 acres, close to city, finest land ever, very good house and
large barn, fruit and shade trees. One of the best close-in
suburban homes here. Cheap.
«
MOSCOW HOUSES
No. 9—8-room house and acre land. This house is strictly modern ex
cept heat, has full basement, is plastered, well finished, garage,
barn, chicken house, cement walks to house. Fine view and one of
the choice homes, $4500, easy terms, or might take smaller place
for part.
No. 10—8-room house, near Polk Street North, hath, toilet, lights, fine
shade trees, lawn. Cheap at $2000. Terms: $300 cash and monthly
like rent.
No. 11—6 -room bungalow, close to paved street, modern except heat.
Can buy with $300 cash and monthly. $2800.
No. 12—6-room house and barn. North Washington Street, $800.
No. 13—4-roqm house, level lot, nearly new house, $750.
These are only a few of our listings.
SEE US FOR ALL KINDS OF TRADES
SPECIALS
AT
Cold Storage Market
25c
TEAL STEW, per pound.
HAMBURGER, per pound.
PORK SAUSAGE, per pound.
BACK BONES, six pounds.
LUNCH MEATS OF ALL KINDS.
22c
25c
25c
Cold Storage Market
219 Main Street. Phone 7

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