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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, June 19, 1919, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
¥OLcME VIH
NUMBER 224
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO, THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 1919
GERMANS SAY THEY EXPECT
LONDON.—(By the Associated Press.)—The flight
of the British dirigible, R-34, which was to have started
for New Foundland today on a trans-Atlantic flight, has
been definitely postponed until Germany decides what she
intends to do in regard to the peace terms.
Should Germany refuse to sign, according to one of
the officers of the R-34, her flight will be eastward in
stead of westward.
Airships are today making demonstration flights over
Germany but will return to their bases tonight and remain
* there until Gerrflfany's decision is announced.
With President Wilson visiting the King of Belgium and Lloyd George
touring the battle fields of France, and other members of the peace confer
ence resting from their arduous labors, German statesmen are "sweating
blood" over the peace treaty, which they must accept and sign before Monday
If they save Germany from being further invaded and the German govern
ment entirely destroyed. A few German newspapers and a few German
leaders ai^e talking fight and telling of the splendid condition of Noske's
German army.
The four leaders of the peace conference seem to be the only persons
* -
connected with the great drama who are idle today. Marshal Foch is getting
an army of 600,000 picked men from the British, French and American forces
in readiness for a quick and decisive forward movement. Nothing is being
left to chance. Canadian soldiers in England are being held to await Ger
many's decision. American soldiers at Brest, brought back from Siberia, are
also being held. Allied airplanes are flying over Germany, taking photo
graphs and doing scouting duty. The great British dirigible, more than 600
feet in length and capable of carrying many tons of bombs and war munl -!
tions, which was to have sailed for New Foundland today, will remain iu)
England, prepared to fly to Berlin and drop a few tons of bombs on that
capital, if Germany rejects the peace terms.
Berlin newspapers predict the reopening of hostilities Monday. The so
clallst paper, Vorwaerts, announced that fighting is to be resumed. A Ham
burg paper states that the people of eastern Germany are greatly excited and
are prepared to fight again. From Weimar comes the report that the Ger
man peace delegation had advised the cabinet to reject the peace treaty, and'
it is reported that so-called "experts" with the peace delegation have advised
the rejection of the treaty and predicted that it will not be signed.
W Dson Visiting In Belgium Today.
BRUSSELS.— (By the American Press.)—President Wilson, who reached
here last night, after a day's trip from the border which took him through
the districts devastated by the war, began the second day of his visit to Bel
gium by motoring to Charleroi with King Albert.
Luncheon'at the American legation, and the president's appearance be
fore the Belgian chamber of deputies, and a reception by Cardinal Mercier
at Malines were features of today's program.
Allow Ships to Proceed to Germany.
DEAL, England, Wednesday Night.—Elghlt American steamers with
days, have proceeded for German ports. There was a report early today that
they would be held here pending the signing of the peace treaty by Germany.
Says Senate Should Not Interfere.
WASHINGTON.—The adoption of the Knox resolution regarding the
league of nations and the peace treaty would be interpreted as an uncalled
for effort by the senate to dictate to the peace conference, Senator Thomas,
democrat, of Colorado, said today in opposing the measure. He declared the
proposal that the senate declare itself now against accepting the league of
nations intertwined with the peace terms would be improper and unwise.
LIKES LATAH COUNTY
COUNTY COMMISSIONER LOOKS
AT LAND IN WASHINGTON,
BUT DON'T WANT IT
"I would rather have my boy pay
$2O0| per acre for land) in Latah
couney than to buy land any where
40 miles west of Spokane for $26
per acre. I think there is that dif
ference. Why, it isjust like a para
dise here after traveling through the
Big Bend district and hundreds of
miles in central Washington."
This is the statement of Columbus
Clark, county "'commissioner of La
tah county, whose home is near Julia
■■etta where he owns a fine farm and
is making a fortune by farming. Mr.
-Clark took his two sons, Elmer and
Lawrence and his son-in law, Floyd
Eckman and drove to Okanogan coun
ty, Washington to look for land for
the young men. They had heard that
land could be bought cheaply there.
They drove in Mr. Clark's Oodsmoile
car and traveled over 800 miles..
They got no land. They returned
more in love with Latah county than
ever.
"After we left Spokane w;e saw no
good crops of grain," said Mr. Clark".
"We drove to Okanogan City and Or
oville, near the Canadian border, go
ing via Coulee City and Mansfield.
Why it is so dry and dusty there
that you cannot see and the crops
We did not see a good
are very poor.
crop after leaving Spokane until as
we got back into Spokane county and
struck Spangle. There are some
good crops in that section and from
there to Moscow the crops are good,
Of course we need rain, but we will
get rain before long. This east wind
means rain. But we will have a far
better crop in Latah and Whitman
fore harvest than that Big Bend
counties if we get no more rain be
country will produce in a favorable
season. That country needs rain bad
ly and if they do not get it within a
few days the crop will be almost a
failure. I tell you old Latah county
looks better to me today than it has
ever looked. I don't want my boys
to go out west of Spokane and try to
farm in that sandy, dry section."
The party made the trip of 800 ,
miles in Mr. Clark's new "sport mod- i
cently bought |
We never had
el'
Oldsmobile car, re
from A. S. Frost.
one minute's trouble with the car on j
the entire trip," said Mr. Clark, "and j
I like the car better than ever just j
I like Latah county better than j
ever after making the trip." The j
party reached Moscow this morning f
and left at once for Mr. Clark's home i
as
near Juliaetta.
j
m.
FEDERATION OF LABOR
WOULD DEFT COURTS
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.—The Ameri
can federation of labor in a resolu
tion adopted at the convention here
today condemning what it declared to
be "usurpations by the judiciary" of
the government's legislative and ex
ecutive powers, recommended that or
ganized labor disregard injunction
and court decrees on the grounds that
such decrees violated th_ rights guar
anteed under the constitution. The
convention also adopted a resolution
favoring the restriction of immigra
tion during the reconstruction period.
FABENS, Texas.—Reports from Am
erican outposts " here today said that
everything is qiiiet along the line and
?a.
Quiet on the Border,
no Villa activities have been noticed
«on the inland" or near Guadalupe,
where 70 Villa men were seen late
yesterday. Camp fires of a Villa band
could be seen all night and American
patrols watched closely along the bor
der to prevent a raid into the United
states.
* SCHOOL TEACHERS
+
START REVOLUTION *
4>


PANAMA.—(By the Associated *
♦ Press.)—Reports concerning the ♦
4* recent revolutionary outbreak in +
♦ San Rican capital, received by ♦
♦ the Costa Rican consul here, de- 4*
♦ dared the outbreak began Thurs- +
+ day, last and continued Friday. ♦
♦ It was led by school teachers who +
♦ had been threatened with a re- ♦
+ duction of pay. The consul be- ♦
+ lieves the riots were due to Bol- 4*
♦ sheviki influence.
♦♦+♦♦++♦+*♦♦♦+♦♦♦
-f53
+

PRESIDENTLINBLEY
DELIVERED
o
HEAD OF UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO
CHIEF SPEAKER AT U. OF W.
COMMENCEMENT
Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of the
University of Idaho, delivered the com
mencement address at the University
of Washington, Seattle, Monday, June
16, when a class of 293 students re
ceived degrees in Washington's big
gest educational institution.
Post Intelligencer devoted an entire
The
page to the commencement exercises,
featuring Dr. Lindley, and publishing
a splendid photograph of him as he
appeared in cap and gown at the coin
me ncement exercise. Dr. Lindley's ad
dregg made a «Hit" with the students
ag f ormer addr esses by him have won
jhiip a great reputation as a speaker
in otber meetings at Seattle. The Post
intelligencer's account of Dr. Llnd
j e y* s speech follows:
The commencement address was
made by jj r Ernest Hiram Lindley,
pres i de nt of the University of Idaho,
The value of training to Increase
human efficiency and power was the
theme of his speech. He outlined the
different values of wealth, as Intellect
ual, social, moral and educational. But
in the end, he said, there is ,no wealth
but life itself.
Man, the Builder.
"There is no wealth in the fields, the
mines or the forests until man utilizes
them," he said. "Iron at the mine is
worth a dollar a ton, made into rails
it is worth $30 a ton, but as watch
springs it is worth $400 a ton. The
more mind you put into it the more
wealth you produce. The dollar in the
hands of a careless spender shrinks to
a dime, while in the hands of a shrewd
man, or better still, woman, it has the,
value of almost half an eagle.
"The social value of money is illus
trated by the rise of values where peo
ple are gathered together and at the
same time the character of the people
who make up the community determine
the social value. But the human factor
is what determines the value of the
wealth, they make wealth by consum
ing it and they themselves are wealth.
The nation with the greatest number
of efficient individuals, men and wo
men, boys* and girls, is the most
wealthy.
Depends on Training.
"And the efficiency of the individual
depends on his training, which in turn
depends on his opportunities. The old
falla. c y of great men having to come
from the country or through privation,
n0 *- drifted by figures which show
e ight out of ten successful men
come from the cities. The problem
rural life today is to send com
Petitive stimulus to the farthest farms
that they may benefit by the energy
of society.
"What we too little appreciate is the
blood that flows in our veins. The
great dominant stocks of the most
wonderful race furnishes the vitality
D
Conflicting Thoughts
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that makes the American people what
they are. Governor Cleveland said that
he could find in any town of 5000
population a lawyer of sufficient abil
lly to be attorney general of the
United States.
If we have another
great crisis five years from now it
is a most certain fact that the man
who will lead this nation to a sue
cessful conclusion of that crisis is not
Known in public life today. At the
beginning of the civil war U. S. Grant
was facing personal failure, but when
the call came the blood that was in
him called to him to be a great leader
and this nation was saved.
War Was Great Crucible.
"God knows we are on the frontier
in our international relations, in our
economical life, in our religious life
today, and from the unknown men
whom we have been training in our
schools, in our colleges and in our
complex modern life will come the
man who will lead us to our destiny.
This war showed what men could do
when forced into action. Men in Ger
many who had been parasites on their
pigs and their cows suddenly discover
ed in themselves heroism no one had
dreamed they had. The war trans
formed our soft youths into the
Bessemer steel of manhood and sent
them back with an understanding love
of country that is the despair of those I
. .. 1 , . . ,, ,
of us that have not been through it. 1 "
&
LOAD Of FINE WOOL;
-
OF 20,000 POUNDS OF
WOOL BY LATAH FARMERS
BRAIGS 48 CENTS
POOL
lJ
A shipment of 20,000 pounds of[
wool produced on farms near Moscow
was made Thursday by the Moscow,
Union Warehouse Company, owned j
and managed by the Farmers Union.
The wool was produced by the farm
ers near here who keep small bands
of sheep, ranging from 20 to 200 on ■
their farms. J. 'E. Kimble, living
west of town, had the largest amount
2,100 pounds for the pool. Mr. Kim
ble has 200 head of fine sheep that
yielded over 10 pounds of wool per
head. At 48 cent's, the price paid for
the entire lot, the wool from his sheep
brought about $5 per head. Other
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lots ranged from 200 pounds, up.
It takes 24,000 pounds of wool for
a minimum carload so this car will
stop at Pullman to be loaded and the
wool will go to Portland where there
are large wool warehouses operated
by the sheepmen of Oregon. The price
paid for wool in the pool is 48 cents a
pound. A few farmers who did not
put their wool in the pool got 43%
cents a pound. Strong efforts were
made by some buyers to break the
pool but these efforts failed. One
farmer with a fair sized consignment
of wool was offered 47 cents per
pound if he would pull out of the
pool. He was told that the price of-J
fered was several cents higher than
would be paid for the pool and the
price of 43% cents at .which some
dividuals had sold was quoted
But he "stood pat" and got
48 cents for his wool and by holding
the pool together all others who had
wool in the pool got the same price.
George Seivers, manager of the
to him.
Mosocw Union Warehouse Company, ;
said:
'The farmers have pooled their
wool for several years and have been
able to get much better prices than if
they had sold individually. Most of
the farmers near here who
raise
sheep join the pool and it has always
proved beneficial. Latah county is I
now producing a considerable amount [
of wool of fine quality and a goo ddeal ^
of wool comes to Moscow from Whit
man county, Washington."
'
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MOSCOW HAS EIGHTY-FIVE
j
NEW YORK.—Governor Davis was
accorded unusual courtesy Monday,
being the first governor allowed to
meet and £rat ernize with troops de
barking . After waiting tw0 days for
th0 arrival of tbe bT s transp0 rt Peer
lesgj Qn which the 146th fie i d artillery
returned> he met the Peerless at the
quarantino sta tion and followed the
shlp _ In papera and gift3 thr0W n
aboard the vessel t0 the men greetings
exchanged . On the piers the gov
ernor . g party mingled witb the Idaho
roopg
.. . , , . . .. ,
No happier troops have arrived thah
,, .
the famous 146th, part of which field
'artillery brigade spent a longer time
IDAHO SOLDIERS
MET BY OFFICIALS
GOVERNOR, CONGRESSMEN AND
SENATOR GREET IDAHO HER
OES AT NEW YORK
brigade spent a longer time
jon the front than any other troops.
iThey were at the front from July 7,
1917, until the signing of the armis
jtice, and took part In the St. Mihiel,
Meuse, Argonne, Chateau Thierry,
Champagne and Marne defensive, and
in the Aisne-Marne offensive.
"There are no better men in the
world, nor any better soldiers, than
These Idaho lads," said the commaud
er> Co i P H . Weyrauch of Walla
«There are no prouder men." re
p , ied a Boise j ad , «Our governor and
Walla.
[people are here to greet us."
In the party were Governor Davis,
Burton L. French, Addison T. Smith,
former Governor Gooding, Mr. and
Mrs. C. C. Anderson, Mrs. W. E. Bo
|rah, Mrs. R. H. Smalley, Francis Por
terfleld, E. M. Wood, Miss Stella
Baird, Mrs. J. 0. Athey and Miss
.Nancy Watts. The party will go to
see the boys at Camp Merritt, Tuesday
morning.
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'REV. J. Q. BIGGS AND FAMILY TO
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J. Quincy Biggs, Mrs. Biggs and their
Î0 LAKE LONG TRIP
- sa —
SPEND 10 WEEKS ON AUTO
MOBILE TOUR
Next Monday morning, June 23, Rev.
two daughters, Portia and Anita, leave
Moscow for Port Worth, Texas. They
will go through in their Oakland car,
whioh will be fully equipped with a
camping outfit, suitable for the long
in-[trip. The family does not plan to stop
'at hotels any place, but to camp out
every night. They ^expect to spend 10
weeks on the roa*d and will camp,
except when visiting
relatives and
friends along the road.
They leave here for Baker, Oregon,
their first stop, going via Lewiston,
Anatone, Paradise, Enterprise, Minam,
'Bligin and Union, Oregon. At Baker
[they will spend some time visiting a
brother and sister of Mr. and Mrs.
Biggs. Dr. Biggs of Baker, is a broth
er of Rev. J. Quincy Biggs and his
wife is a sister of Mrs, Biggs. The
Rev. Mr. Biggs will occupy the pulpit
£n the Christian church at Baker on
Sunday, June 29.
He was formerly
pastor there, leaving Baker, in 1913,
j for Spokane, where he was pastor of
I the Dwan Avenue Christian church
and instructor in the Spokane Unl
j versity.
From Baker they go to Buhl. Idaho,
I to visit a sister of Mrs. Biggs. From
,Buhl they turn north and go to Yellow
stone National Park, going in at the
j west entrance and leaving by the
. north entrance. They will go through
Montana and the two Dakotas and
strike for Kansas City,
spend some time in Missouri visiting
relatives and friends and will then go
to Enid, Oklahoma, and spend soma
time gt Phillips University, which is
Mr; ' Brags' alma mater. They expect
to reach Fort Worth about September
list, which is the beginning of the
They will
school year at the Texas Christian
University, where Rev. Mr. Biggs be
comes
'Professor" Biggs and
takes
the chair of oratory in that school.
r
Miss Camille McDaniel, who grad
uated this year from the university,
will teach next school year in the
high schol at Nez Perce, Idaho.
Tomorrow, Friday, June 20, 85 grad
uates of the eighth grade of Mos
cow's schools will be given diplomas
and will be entitled to enter the higk
school next year.
This splendid
class will hold graduating exercise*
at the high school auditorium at 2:30t
Friday afternoon, when a splendid
program will be rendered. The class
motto is "Labor Conquers All." The
class colors are pink and white and
the class flower is the rose. There
are some of the ninth B grade in this
class as the eighth A class.
Parents and friends of the class
members are invited to attend the ex
ercises which will be full of interest
The program will be replete with voc
al and instrumental music, recitations,
readings and other features. The di
plomas will be presented by H. D.
Martin, president of the board of di
rectors of Moscow Independent dis
trict. The full program follows:
Chorus
a. "The Call to Arms''
b. Lullaby, "Dream-Wings'
c. "Hail to the Heroes"
Combined Classes.
Chorus, Eight A Class Song
Violin Solo
Nellie Paulsou
accompanied by Eloise Paulson
Reading, "The Name of Old Glory"
Bernadine Beddall
Pantonime, "My Country, 'Tis of Thee"
Irene Beardsley
Lillian Heiland
Saxophone Solo
a. "Träumerei"
b. Le Secret
Chorus, "Shadows Over the Sea
Girls from Eight A Class
Chorus, Nine B Class Song
Chorus, "Boy Scouts"
Boys from Combined Classes
Chorus, "The Spirit of Victory"
Combined Classes
Presentation of Diplomas
H. D. Martin, Pres, of Board
Chorus, "The Star Spangled Banner"
. Accompanists, Miss Grace Plummer,
Miss Alice E. Peterson.
Director of Music, Miss Kendrick.
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+ Want Prize Fight Stopped. ♦
+ COLUMBUS.—The lower house ♦
•fr of the Ohio legislature this after- ♦
4* noon adopted a resolution ask- ♦
4* ing Governor Cox to stop the ♦
4* Willard-Dempsey heavy weight ♦
4* championship prize fight to be ♦
4* held in Toledo on July 4.
4 - 4 - 4 - 4 " 4 - 4 * 4 * 4 « 4 » 4 * +
+
COURT MES GIRLS
CHILDREN OF POTLATCH COUPLE
TO REMAIN UNDER JURISDIC
TION OF COURT
The divorce ease of Mabel B. Byrum
vs. William B. Byrum occupied the
attention of Judge Steele in the dis
trit court yesterday afternoon. Mrs.
Byrum has sued for divorce and the
custody of the two children, aged 10
and four years, both girls. Byrum
was willing for his wife to have a di
vorce but was not willing that the
children should be left to her care.
She charged him with cruelty. She
was represented by Nisbet & Evana
and Byrum's attorneys were Morgan
& Boom.
Judge Steele granted the divorce
but refused to permit either parent to
have absolute control of the children.
They will be left at Potlatch and car
ed for there and the older girl will be
kept in school. Mrs. Byrum will have
the right to look after them but Judge
Steele made it plain that he has cus
tody of the children and will order
them cared for by other persons if he
learns that they are mistreated in
any way.
This is an echo of the noted Potlatch
case in which two young women, one
married but neither of them of age,
confessed (p illicit relations with
numerous 2 pen and boys of Potlatch
and Moscow, resulting in the unmar
ried girl being sent to the reform
school and several men paying heavy
fines. One of the girls made affidavit
that Byrum had tried to assault her.
'- » -
Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Simpson left
today for California, where they will
spend the summer, remaining until
the last of August. They_ will visit
their nephew, Philip Yunge at Bell
ingham.
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