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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, June 25, 1919, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
■f
VOLUME VIII
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 1919
NUMBER 22»
GERMANS DELIBERATELY
PARIS.—(By the Associated Press.)—If heads of al
lied powers in Paris do not hear from Weimar very soon
in regard to the German delegation for the signing of the
peace treaty, an ultimatum will be sent the German gov
ernment, according to the Paris office of Reuter's Limited.
The ultimatum will demand the appointment of plen
ipotentiaries within a certain number of hours.
GERMAN DELAY VEXES ALLIED LEADERS
PARIS.—(By the Associated Press.)—Up to 4:45 p. m.
today no official word had been received here concerning
Germany's plans regarding the formal signing of the
peace treaty. Peace conference leaders are undisguisedly
perplexed over the situation.
It is now conceded that it will be impossible that the
ceremony of signing could take place before Saturday.
Unofficial reports were that it will probably be delayed
until Monday. Haniel Von Haimhausen, German repre
sentative at Versailles, said this afternoon that he had re
ceived no news except that members of the government
had left Weimar for Berlin last night.
HUNGARY GIVEN AN ULTIMATUM
COPENHAGEN.—(By the Associated Press.)—Allied
commanders have given the Hungarians until the evening
of June 28 to evacuate the part of Czecho-Slovakia which
they invaded, according to Budapest dispatches received
here today.- Full compensation for damages done by Hun
*>
T
garian troops is demanded. When the evacuation is com
pleted the allies, it is said, will request the Rumanians to
evacuate Hungarian territory.
Stubborn, sullen and insulting to the last, the Germans seem to have
stopped with the notification that the peace treaty would be accepted -un
conditionally, when they found there- was no other alternative, and are now
devoting their energies to striving to cause as much inconvenience and an.
noyance as possible and to show disrespect for the allied powers. They have
neglected to name a date when their delegation will reach Versailles to sign
the peace treaty and to notify the allied representatives of the personnel
of the delegation. The patience of the leaders of the allies is about exhausted
and Germany may yet feel the displeasure of outraged dignity. It now seems
likely that the peace terms win not be signed before Monday.
In the meantime food riots in Germany are causing that government much
concern. The report that dogs and cats were being served as food to the
German people caused riots in which many were killed.
Planned to Kfll Scheldemann.
LONDON.—(By the Associated Press.)—A number of soldiers have been
arrested at Weimar, according to an Exchange Telegraph dispatch from Copen
hagen, on charges of having planneo to arrest and murder Philip Scheide
former premier. The plot was to be carried out Monday evening.
Object to Eating Dogs and Cats.
COPENHAGEN.—Serious rioting occurred in Hamburg, Monday and Tues
day, when mobs attacked food preserving factories, it being alleged that
bodies of dogs and cats had been found in them. The war provision depart
ment was also attacked and the offices wrecked,
the troops marching through the streets when the latter opened fire and a
number of persons were killed and wounded.
A
manu,
The mob tried to disarm
Hungarian Workmen to Be Mobilized.
PARIS.— (Havas.)—The Hungarian communist congress has ordered a gen
The military
eral mobilization of all \yorkmen a Budapest dispatch says.
. situation is reported unfavorable to Hungary as the morale of the troops is
bad.
Russian White are Nearing Petrograd.
HELINGSFORS, Tuesday Night—(By the Associated Press.)—Russian vol
unteer white guards have occupied Peterhof, which is 19 miles from Petro
grad, according to reports received here.
Fix Hour But Not Day of Signing.
PARIS.—(By the Associated Press.)—The treaty of peace may be signed
Friday or Saturday, it was believed here this morning. Although the day is
not definitely fixed it has been decided the hour for the ceremony will be
2 p. m. The peace conference secretary is still without official knowledge
of the personnel of the German delegation and it is not known when it will
arrive at Versailles. Haniel Von Haimhausen, acting German representative
at Versailles, is also apparently without information.
HIKER AND SON
TRIED FOR MINDER
WEALTHY STOCKMEN OF NORTH
ERN ARIZONA FACE FIRST DE
GREE MURDER CHARGE
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz.—The second
trial of Harry Earl Stephens, already
convicted of first degree murder, open
ed here today with the promise of be
ing the most sensational and hard
fought murder .case in the history of
northern Arizona.
Stephens and his father, Joseph H.
Stephens, a prominent cattleman, who
also is alleged to have been impli
cated in the killing of Robert Miller,
who worked on the Stephens' ranch,
have been out on $50,000 bonds each.
The shooting of Miller, which oc
curred April 2, 1918, is reported to
have followed trouble In the Steph
ens' home between Mrs. Stephens and
her husband, Miller was killed in a
store in Prescott and the elder Steph
is alleged to have countenanced
the deed with which his 22-year-old
son Is charged. Miller was a man of
ens
about 25 years.
At the first trial of Harry E. Steph
ens in Prescott last year, the young
man was found guilty of first degre
murder by the jury after 30 minutes
deliberation. An appeal was taken to
the state supreme court, irregular
ities in summoning the jury panel be
ing alleged and the judgment of the
lower court was reversed. Stephens
then obtained a change of venue from
Yavapai to Coconino county and the
new trial was ordered held here.
It is expected that, following the
decision of his son's case the elder
Stephens will be placed in ,j.he dock.
Both the state and defense are rep
resented by an imposing array of
counsel and this, coupled with the
fact that the Stephens family is well
known throughout northern Arizona,
forecasts wide-spread interest in the
case.
Award Bridge Contract
The county commissioners awarded
the contract of building the steel j
bridge across the Potlatch, 1% miles j
above Kendrick to the Security Bridge |
company of Lewiston for the sum of j
$1000. This contract is for the full J
structure, including the abutments. |
FREE 10 SOLDIERS
iGOFFEE'DOOSHNOTS
BEST PEOPLE ON EARTH TO ES
TABLISH SALTATION ABUT
HUT OX ELKS' DAT
In commemoration of the fact that
the Elks were the first organization
in America to present the Salvation
Army with funds to make possible the
wonderful overseas work of that most
popular welfare organization,
lodge of Elks has decided to estab
lish for the third of July, which
Elks' Day, a regular Salvation Army
booth or hut. at which doughnuts and
coffee will be given free to all sol
diers. Four Salvation Army lassies
from Spokane will be in Moscow on
that date to take charge of the booth,
which will be erected near the Elks'
temple. The Elks will provide every
thing that is necessary to entertain
every soldier as often as he likes in
true Salvation Army style.
Assisting the four Spokane Salva
tion Army lassies will be a group of
young ladies of Moscow, who will al
so wear the very fetching bonnet of
the lassies. The Moscow girls who
will serve the soldiei-s all day long
on the Third are, the Misses Margaret
Friedman, Jennie Peterson, Bernadine;
Adair, Lois Parsons, Margaret Byrne,
Esther Thomas, Ethel Babcock, Norma
Dow, Ferrol Richardson, Margaret
Denning, Catherine Frantz, and
Catherine Keane. Mrs. Warren Truitt
the*
has been placed by Mrs. Day, the
chairman, in charge of the making of
the Salvation Army bonnets.
of the
"The idea of connecting Elks' Day
in the Welcome Home celebration
with the Salvation Army lassies," said
]V|rs. Day, when interviewed by a
Star-Mirror reporter, "seems to be
one that appeals to everybody as most
appropriate. I am sure the Salvation
Army booth which will he erected in
the open space just south
Elks' temple will be a very popular^color
spot with the soldiers, particularly
when they see how many charming
young ladies there are wearing the
bonnets that day. The Elks, with
their customary generosity, have or
dered literally thousands and thou
sands of doughnuts and we want the
boys to come to the booth over and
over again to be served as they were
served by the lassies 'over there.' "
The committee assisting Mrs. Day is
composed of Mrs. Yost, Mrs. Hutton,
Mrs. Morgareidge, Mrs. Truitt, and
Mrs. Stewart.
VOTE OF THANKS TO
FIREMEN OF MOSCOW
A vote of thanks is extended to the
firemen of Moscow for their prompt
ness in responding to the fire alarm
this morning. Although it was only
a few minutes after midnight, seve
ral of the men were nearly at the fire
station when Chief Carl Smith reach
ed there, although the chief has an
automobile always ready and is
among the very first to get the alarm.
This prompt action of the chief and
his men probably saved Moscow a
costly fire for had it got a little bet
ter headway it would have spread
to a range of buildings and would
have been hard to control.
Smith wishes it understood that when
the fire alarm is sounded as long as
it was last night the fire is in the
business section and there is need for
prompt action. Moscow is proud of
and thankful to its splendid fire fight
ing department which has given this
town the best record of any town in
the northwest for the past two years.
Chief
0
He Has Had His Day
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ENORMOUS AMOUNT
Of PRCIEIC SEAFOOD
WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY PRO
FESSOR DISCOURSES ON SEA
FOOD TALUES
SAN FRANCISCO.—The
available
food resources of the North Pacific
ocean are being utilized only in small
part, according to Professor John M.
Cobby, director of the College of Fish
eries at the University of Washing
ton, Seattle.
"There are in our Pacific Coast wa
ters, so far as known, more than 400
species of fish, several hundred spec
ies of crustaceans and mollusks and
many species of marine algae. More
than half of the species of fish are
known to possess considerable food
values, yet we do not utilize more
than about 45 to 50 of them and of
these 15 species are used to a very
limited extent. Of the crustaceans
about six species are used commer
cially, while of the mollusks only
about 11 species are to be found in
our markets.
"Many problems in connection with
the best methods of preparing these
for market will have to be solved be
fore the majority of the species can
be utilized, and these problems are
being attacked in fisheries experi
mental laboratories established on
this coast since 1916. A considerable
part of research work of the new Col
lege of Fisheries will be along these
lines.
"An interesting problem for the bac
teriologist and chemist is that of de
termining why the flesh of certain
Chinook or King salmon should be
white while the large majority are of
the usual salmon color. This pe
culiar condition prevails from Puget
Sound to Bering Sea, being practically
unknown south of the Sound, and the
proportion is from one-fourth to one
I third of the catch. With these off
'■
fish the flesh is generally white,
although occasionally one is found
with the flesh on one side white and
on the other red, while a few have
mottled flesh. As these white-meated
fish do not bring the fishermen much
more than one-fifth the price obtain-
ed for the red-meated fish, owing to
the difficulty experienced in finding
a market for them, it inflicts a heavy
financial handicap upon those operat-
ing in the regions affected.''
-B#
PROMPT ACTION AVERTS
SERIOUS FIRE THIS MORNING
At about 12:30 this morning the fire
alarm called the fire department to
the meat shop of Hagan Cushing,
where the electric motor of the re
frigerator plant had burned out and
had started a small blaze. The fire
was discovered by E. Stanley, who
detected an odor of burning oil and
investigated the cause.
No great damage was done owing
to the prompt action of our efficient
fire department and night marshal.
Rocking Chairs Wanted.
Mrs. R. Holman is chairman of a
committee to care for the old sol
diers—the veterans of the Civil war—
on July 3, 4 and 6. She says the
committee wants to borrow a lot of
rocking chairs for the soldiers and
that if any one will telephone her at
262R, she will have a car sent for
the chairs and return them after the
celebration. Many chairs are needed
for the committee hopes to have a
number of old soldiers to be entertain
ed and wants to make them as com
fortable as possible.
I ipjlf ,1 H ffTlfnC 1RMV
L CU ' J ' "' fC ™
ELK'S RECEPTION
TOMORROW NIGHT
BIG SOCIAL EVENT AT THE TEM
PLE THURSDAY EVENING, BE
GINNING AT S;30
What promises to be by far
most important and delightful social
event of the entire summer season
the Elks' reception and dance to
given tomorrow evening at the temple
on North Main street. Beginning
8:30, the Elks and their wives will
at home to all friends of the organiza
tlon, and a very cordial invitation
extended to those who would enjoy
evening in the handsome rooms.
Ihe Elks temple has just been en
I "«ly remodeled and redecorated, and
there are no handsomer club room.
in the northwest. A perfect maple
floor has been laid in the ball room.
New hangings have been placed in the
reception room, library, and billiard
rooms, and new furniture has been
provided for the whole building. There
is an entirely new and modern Bowl
ing alley. The Elks are eager to share
their beautiful home with their
friends, and for this reason an im
promptu party has been arranged for
the very first evening after the com
pletion of the remodeling.
Mrs. Jerome J. Day is acting as
chairman for the At Home, and this
fact alone insures the complete suc
cess of the undertaking.
In the receiving line will be the
chair officers: Exalted Ruler Edgar
Steele and his wife; Mr. and Mrs. Geo.
N. Lampher®, and Mr. and Mrs. J. J.
Keane; they will be assisted by the
trustees and their wives, Mr. and Mrs.
L. F. Parsons, Mr. and Mrs. George
W>' Suppiger, and Mr. George Pickett.
Mrs. Day has asked Mrs. Fred
Veatch, Mrs. G. P. Mix and Miss Per
meal French to act as the flower com
mittee for the decorations. Punch
will be served in the library by the
Misses Helen Parsons, Helen Stanton,
Mary Williamson, and Iris Armbrust
er.
Holman's orchestra in the ball room
will furnish delightful dance music
throughout the evening.
Has
Town TOOK
NOW III PROGRESS
LEADER OF NONPARTIZAN
LEAGUE CHARGED WITH
SEDITIOUS UTTERANCES
Today the trial of A. C. Townley,
national president of nonpartizan lea
gue. who is charged, jointly with the
secretary of the league. Jos. Gilbert,
a former organizer and close friend of
Townley with sedition, began at
been fighting the indictment for two
years but has finally been forced to
go to trial, but he is not present, be
ing engaged in campaigning for non
partizan issues in North
where an election on nonpartizan
matters is to be held soon. After
Dakota,
striving in vain to get a postpone
ment his attorneys were forced to go
to trial without Townley being pres
ent. He is under bonds and his bond
will he forfeited If he does not ap
pear in court.
Towley Not Present
JACKSON, Minn.—When the trial
of A. C. Townley, president of the
nonpartizan league; and Joseph Gil
bert, a former organizer for the
league, both of whom are charged
with conspiracy to arouse disloyalty,
was resumed this forenoon in the
Jackson county district court, Town
ley had ont made his appearance. His
associates said they understood he left
Fargo, North Dakota, today, for Jack
son.
Are Taking Testimony
Taking of testimony in the trial
of President A. C. Townley, of the
national nonpartizan league; and Jos
eph Gilbert, former league organizer,
on an indictment charging conspiracy
to commit sedition was begun in the
district court here this forenoon.
Judge Deaa had denied the defense's
motion to dismiss the case and re
fused to grant separate trials for the
two defendants, on the grounds that
when two or more persons are charg
ed with conspiracy they must be tried
together.
The daring army aviator who waft
the first to cross the Cascade moun
tains in Washington and the BItur
mountains in Oregon in an airplane,
and who will fly over Moscow on
July 3, 4 and 5, in the airplane in.
which he has flown from Mather fiel».
Sacramento, California, is in town to
day. He is Lieutenant Jay M. Fetters,
formerly of Spokane, who has won
! an enviable reputation in the air serv
j
is
be |
j
at
j
is i
ice of his country as an instructor
and aviator. He came down from Spo
kane on the train today and will go
Tomorrow he
flies from Spokane to Colville, 14(1
miles north of Spokane.
WU1 Be Here Tuesday.
i back this afternoon.
Lieutenant Fetters will fly
from
! Spokane to Moscow, Tuesday, July 1.
I He will be accompanied by his mech
1 aniclan. Sergeant O. Kessel, who has
- i accompanied him all the way from
j California. They will land in the falr
ground . xhere wil , be no exhibition
flight that day
simply come to Moscow and land aad
be covered and cared for.
To Lewiston Wednesday.
On Wednesday, July 2, Lieutenant
Fetters and Sergeant Kessel will fly
from Moscow to Lewiston and return.
They will spend a short time in Lew
iston and probably make some exhibi
tion flights over the river city, re
turning to Moscow in the afternoon.
The airplane will
Thursday, Friday Saturday,
July 3, 4 and 5, the airplane will make
daily flights over Moscow and sur
rounding country. This is the object
tor which the machine comes here. It
was secured through the efforts of
L. F. Parsons, secretary of the cham
ber of commerce, with the assistance
of Burton L. French, congressman for
this state, who took the matter up with
the air service department.
Lieutenant Fetters is a pleasant
young man, full of life and energy and
enthusiastic for the army and the air
service. He is as brown as an Indian,
due to the heavy coat of tan he has
acquired by open-air work, and Is
the picture of health and manly vigor.
Ba
SHERIFF SAYS THERE
WILL BE NO STRIKE
SPOKANE.—Sheriff J. H. Scott, of
Shoshone county, Idaho, makes the
statement here that he expects the
wage question in the Coeur d'Alenes
to be settled without a strike. "It is a
crowd of foreigners, a bölshevist ele
ment, who are the instigators of the
strike movement,'' says Sheriff Scott.
"They are a gang who were run out
of Butte and who recently came into
the Coeur d'Alenes.
The American
miners and the men who are resi-
dents of the district appeaç to he sat-
isfied that the mining companies are
doing the best possible under prevail-
ing market conditions."
- SSî -
BIG BOWERY DANCE
FRIDAY EVENING
BENEFIT BALL GIVEN FOR RE
TURNED SOLDIERS' MOS
COW ORGANIZATION
i The general public is very strong
| ly urged to patronize and attend the
bowery dance which will be given on
Friday evening of this week, at the
new bowery pavilion now being erect
ed on South Main street. This dance
will be given under the auspices of and
for the benefit of the Latah Post of
the American Legion, in conjunction
with the Daughters of Veterans, and
the affair will be one of the jolllest
and pleasantest of the summer.
The soldiers who have been estab
lishing the Latah post of the Amer
lean Legion have been promised many
things heretofore, but so far little
has been done for them. It is highly
important
that
the organization
should receive the hearty support of
the entire community, and the com
mittee in charge is anxious that a rec
ord crowd should be in attendance.
Splendid music and an excellent
floor have been provided, and the de-
lightfully cool evenings for which
Moscow is famous, will make the bow-
ery dance on Friday evening an
ideal entertainment.
- pea -
Arlie Decker, land agent of the Pot
latch Lumber company at Potlatch
motored to Moscow yesterday, return
ing to Potlatch today.

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