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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, October 01, 1919, Image 2

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rhe DAILY STAR-MIRROR
iblished every evening except Su
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher,
n
ia Official Newspaper of the City of
Moscow.
Entered as second-class
Et. 16, 1911, at the postoffice of
oscow, Idaho, under the Act of Con
■ess of March. 1879.
matter
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Delivered by carrier to any part of
be city:
*er Month .
Tire« Months ..
lix Months .
h»e Year.
60c
.. .$1.50
.. . 2.75
5.00
By Mail
(outside of city and on rural routes:)
Per Month .40c
TTtree Months.
Bix Months ..
The (Weekley) Idaho Post
$1.16
2.26
4.00
Per Year
$1.60
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
1 The Associated Press is exclusively
■ «Dtitled to the use for republication
lof all news-dispatches credited to it
l'or not otherwise credited in this paper
•nd also the local news published
therein.
All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also re
served.
SLACKERS SHOW THEIR COLORS
There can be little sympathy with
the shipyard strikers who have again
quit work and tied up ship building
on the Pacific coast. These are the
same men who struck last spring for
$6, $7 and $8 per day for laborers,
helpers and mechanics, when they
were getting $4.46 for laborers, $5.40
for helpers and $6.86 for mechanics.
After losing $40,000,000 worth of
ship building contracts to Pacific I
coast yards the men returned to work,
at the old wage. They tried to start
a revolution at Seattle by calling a
sympathetic strike and stopping all
industry, but were balked in this by
the heroic action of Mayor Hanson of
Seattle and the utter lack of sympa
thy with the movement from the gen
eral public.
Most of the shipyard workers are
Slackers who went into the shipyards
to avoid military service. "I hope they
get cut down to 90 cents a day and
have $7 per month taken from their
wages for hospital fees" said a re
turned soldier, who gave up a good
position to enlist at $30 per month.
Continuing he said:
"Those are the guys that went into
the shipyards to avoid military serv
ice. They have been getting too high
wages for their class. I hope they
lose the strike." That probably rep
resents the sentiment of a majority
of tlfe American soldiers, the real
Americans who enlisted in the army
for love of country while these men,
mostly foreigners, went into the
shipyards to avoid military service.
The real Americans do not sympath
ize with this class of people and this
strike will fail as the former strike
Tailed.
Some time ago The Star-Mirror, in
discussing government ownership and
control of business industries stated
that "the average government depart
ment head who secures his position
through political pull could not hold
a job in a grocery store, if dependent
solely upon his ability." The fact that
people bought and paid for groceries
offered for sale by the government on
August 18, and at this date, October
1, have not received the goods for
which they paid cash in advance in
addition to postage, -sems to sub
stantiate the statements made by this
paper. Every time the government
bus undertaken any kind of business
it has made a miserable failure of it.
The present administration has done
more to cure thç "government owner
ship" germ with which many of us
were aflicted, than hours of argu
ment and volumes of literature could
have accomplished in 5Û years.
».
%■
D'Annundo, the Italian poet, fight
er and adventurer, who took Flume
and is trying to hold it against the
Allied powers, imagines himself a
great man and his cause a holy
H* is a fanatic, unbalanced mentally
but with wonderful
lines. That his revolution will fail
just as that of Bela Kun, the socialist
fanatic, who cooly ordered
iron and children to be butchered
and wept bitterly when placed under
arrest, failed, is certain,
never won a war and never will. It
takes more than fanaticism to win in
<he present age.
one.
power in some
men, wo*
Fanatics
As Sfc R*.
Six dollars a day for eight hours
work, the abolition of the contract,
system and the release of every labor
union man in prison, whether guilty
or innocent, is the modest demands of
the employes of the Oliver Mining
Company, near Ely, Minnesota. The
men went on strike. It is to.be hoped
they remain idle until their demands
are granted in full, in which case
there will be a lot of miners starved
to death. Whenever the American
government opens its jails at the re
quest or demand of any organization,
be it labor union, church, political
party or secret order, the Amancaii
government will have ceased to exist
and we will have bolshevism in its
worst form.
The suggestion that a general hos
pital be built in Moscow for the use
of the entire county is a good one.
Colfax has such a hospital end it is
ranked with the court house as among
the city's most valuable assets. With
such a hospital here and every town
in the county connected with Moscow
by a direct highway or a railroad, the
hospital would be of great benefit
to the entire county. A Moscow citi
zen who recently visited the big hos
pital at Colfax, said: "I was amazed
to find such a splendid institution
where every doctor in that county
could take his patients and have them
well cared for, and to find patients
from so wide a territory. The hos
pital is a great asset to Colfax. Mos
cow ought to have one like it."
»
»
It is now in order for some dis
gruntled congressman to ask, when
Herbert Hoover hands back that
$90,000,000, why he does not also
hand back the other $10,000,000,
though all the members bade goodby
to the whole $100,000,000 voted for
food to keep Europe from starving.
Such men as Hoover are beyond the
comprehension of congress. He has
worked five years, won the applause
of the whole world by doing a tre
mendous job well, yet he quietly re
tires to his old home and resumes
his old business. It is a joy to find
a man who can keep his head level
in such
Oregonian.
circumstances.—Portland
ft-: Sis St
That is a splendid idea of President
Lindley's to meet the freshmen of the
University of Idaho every Wednesday
afternoon for a "confidential chat"
and make the young men and young
women who have entered the school
for the first time, feel at home and
realize that even the very busy presi
dent has their interest at heart and
is willing to take time from his nutn
erou other duties to advise with
them. The university is doing a
grand work . Every
head seems to be the right man in the
right place and Idaho will get some
wonderful results from the work now
being done in the big school.
I*?, Per. Ps
department
Has anything been done yet toward
providing homes for students and for
families who want to come here to
send their children to school ? If we
do not begin soon next September will
find us where we were this year and
then there will be a clamor to divide
the university and take the agricul
tural college to some other part of
the state because Moscow cannot
provide homes for the students in the
growing institution. This is not a
fancied but a real donger. Le us
avoid it by beginning right now to
provide for next year's increased en
rollment.
The average American voter would
welcome a change from the demo
cratic administration that has "balled
things up" so persistently and made
a muddle of so many undertakings,
but the republicans must unite on a
strong candidate if they hope to win.
Only dissatisfied republican votes can
elect a democratic candidate for presi
dent. The sooner the party leaders
realize this and quit quarreling
among themselves and unite on a
strong candidate and a strong and
constructive platform, the sooner will
j the party be united and the defeat of
democracy assured.
► , * A- *»•
The only issue in the great steel
workers strike, as brought out by the
testimony of John Fitzpatrick, chair
man of the steel and iron workers
committee for organization, is wheth
er the plants of the great steel trust
shall be unionized or remain "open"
to both union and non-union labor.
In other words the issue is whether
the 146 plants, mines and works of
the steel trust with two and a half bil
lion dollars capital invested, shall be
managed by the m.çn who invested
the capital or be managed by, Mr.
Fitzpatrick and the other officers of
the union who have not a cent invest
ed in any of the plants nor are they
even employed In them as laborers.
In his testimony before the senate in-,
vestigating committee Mr. Fitzpatrick
said that "neither wages nor condi
tions are an issue in this Strike, it is
the question of unionizing the shops."
And Mr. Fitzpatrick and Ms associ
ates control the union.
"Wild West" shows still have great
power to attract people, even in the
extreme west where the average man
has seen as good riding and broncho
busting on the range as is seen in any
of these contests. Pendleton and Gar
field won great success with their
"round-ups"
her "border days" and Walla Walla
with her "frontier days"' have never
failed to draw crowds. There is a
and
Orangeville,
pointer in this for Moscow. Let us
have some real "wild west" perform
ances at. the* fair next year. Pendle
ton had 30,000 visitors last week.
Lewiston's big fair this weet is draw
ing many thousands of vi-.ilor; from
wide area. Moscow -;h
.1 begin
prepare now for her fall fair next
We should begin n>- parations
year.
to secure the most popular attractions
at the fairs that have been held
around us this fall, and to hold our
fair early enough next year to get
them before the other towns have
their fairs.
This statement that "all men are
born equal" with which statesmen
love to play, seems absurd to the
thinking men. Some are bom with
brains, others without. Some are
born with energy and the will to do,
others are contented to drift. Crim
inalogists tell us that "crime is hered
Itory and many men are born crimin
als." Kids of very tender years de
velop the tendencies that govern them
in life. Some are constructive, others
are destructive. Some are bom lo
be leaders and others bom to be led,
while still others are born to be
driven. Abqut the only place we
know where "all men are equal" is in
an insane asylum or a penitentiary
and the "equality" about which social
ists and bolshevists rave exists there
as it exists nowhere else. But the
equality is the equality of degrada
tion.
Germany was hurt less by the war
than any other European country en
gaged in the conflict.
Newspaper
correspondents say that Germany was
hurt less than many of the neutral
states. Her territory was uninvaded,
(until after the war closed) and her
cities and farms > and factories were
undamaged. She is in fine condition
now to build up trade and manufac
turing and if the laborers in the al
lied countries continue to tie up indus
try with strikes Germany will have
the world's trade corralled before her
competitors have supplied the hun
gry markets of the world, which are
now open to them without German
competition.
n m m
An Illinois farmer sold the hide of a
calf for $6 and then went to town
and paid $8 for a pair of shoes. Now
he knows what a skin game is—Los
Angeles Times.
If the profiteers don't get our goat
we might eat that.—Boston Tran
script.
An exchange remarks that prohibi
tion has brought a lot of sunshine !
into many homes. It might have gone ^
Elks' Reception
Friday Night
Every Moscow citizen is hereby extended a special invitation to
attend the reception given by the Moscow Lodge of Elks, in their
temple on North Main street, beginning at 8 o'clock Friday evening.
There will be music, refreshments and a general good time.
The reception is given in
Dancing for those who wish to dance,
order that the people of Moscow may meet and become acquainted
with the members of the faculty of the
University of Idaho
and Moscow City Schools
General and Mrs. E. R. Chrisman
Every man and woman in Moscow is urged to attend this re*
ception and help to welcome the educators tô our city. Remember
the Time—Friday Evening at 8:00 o'clock.
THE PLACE—ELKS TEMPLE, NORTH MAIN STREET
You Are Invited. COME !
HOT CHILI
HOT CHICKEN TAMALES
CHICKEN SANDWICHES
FRENCH PASTRY
We Serve
HILL BROS.' BEST COFFEE WITH
Sc Pure Sweet Cream 5c
The BON TON
WOOD & HAMER
further and added "moonshine," too.
*****************
MARKETS
*****************
The following market quotations
are the prices paid to the producer
by the dealer and are changed daily,
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of grain,
produce and meats.
Hay and Grain.
Wheat, Marquis, bulk.
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses.. 2.04
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, blk.
net, delivered to warehouses. . 2.02
Wheat. Fortyfold, No. 1. bulk
net, delivered to warehouses. . 2.04
Wheat, Red Russian, No. l,blk.. 1.99
No. X Feed Oats, sacked, per
cwt. net. Delivered to ware
houses .
No. 1 Timothy Hay per ton... 30.0%
White Beans, per pound
Ipring lambs, per lb....
Mutton» per lb .
$2.06
2.90
[email protected]
. .5(3)7
Produce.
60c
Eggs, per dozen.
Butter, creamery, per pound
Butter, ranch, per pound...
New Potatoes, per pound...
Spring chicken, per lb
Old roosters, per lb.
Hens, live wt.
70c
60c
3c
20c
8c
.16(5)18
HIGHEST PRICES
PAID
for
Old Rags Old Sacks
RUBBERS, METALS, SCRAP IRON
Specialty in
HIDES, FURS, WOOL, SHEEP
PELTS
If you have any Junk just tele
phone 252 and we will call in city
or in country.
UNITED HIDE & JUNK CO.
Karlos Wallace, Proprietor,
308 West Sixth Street, Moscow, Ida.
"HE CAME BACK"
If you Lave any old carpets you
wish woven notify
S. A. Dobncr, Idaho Hotel
Phone 295
Over 200 Local Satisfied Patrons.
Hogs, live wt., light, lb. . . [email protected]
Hogs, live wt., heavy, lb... .14(3)15
Hogs, dyessed, light, per lb. .. .20(3)21
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb.. 19(3)20
Veal, live wt., per lb.7(5)11
Veal, dressed, per [email protected]
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Mortgage Loans
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
MAKER OF CLOTHES FOR THE
MAN WHO KNOWS
Order Now
O. H, SGHWARZ
TAILOR
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
DR. JOHN W. STEVENSON—Eye,
Ear, Nose and Throat. Glasses
Fitted. Office, New Creighton Bldg,
corner Third and Main. Phone 177.
DR. F. M. LEITCH—Physician, Com
mercial Bldg. Phone 223Y.
DR. W. A. ADAIR
Creighton Blk. Phone 86.
Physician,
DR. VIRGIL M. GILCHRIST, Physic
ian.
Specialist in
women and children.
Drug Store. Phone 33J.
diseases of
Over Owl
OSTEOPATH
DR. W. M. HATFIELD—Osteopath,
Creighton Bldg. Phone 48.
DR. W. A. ALLEN, Osteopath. Miller
Bldg. Phone 225. Res. 225H.
_D ENT ISTS_
DR. J. A. McDANIEL, Dentist, First
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phone 229.
LAWYERS
MORGAN & BOOM—Attorneys, Ur
quhart Bldg. P ho ne 75. _
H. OVERSMITH — Atttorney-at
Law. Urquhart Bldg. Phone 208.
ORLAND & LEE — Attorneys-at-Law,
First Natl. Bank Bldg. Phones Or
land 104. Lee 104L.
GUY W. WOLFE—Attorney.- no East
Second St. Phone 17R.
JOHN NISBET—Attorney-at-law 1st
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phone 131J.
IMPROVEMENT PARLOR
MARIE SHANNON.—Rooms 18 and
Phone 122J.
19 Urquhart Bldg.
Shampooing, massage and manicur
ing.
TAXI CAB
NEELY & SON - PHONE 61
at the old prices
PLEASE CALL PHONE 300 FOR
TAXI.
ARCHITECTS
C.
RICHARDSON, ARCHITECT—
Skattaboe Blk., phone 200.
Woodworking and Cabinet-Maker
H. O. FIELD—Ph. 122L. 107 S. Wash.
VETERINARY
DR..E, T. BAKER, VETERINARIAN.
Sixth and Washington. Phone 243.
DR. J. D. ADAMS-—Veterinarian. Dr.
J. S. Thompson in charge. Phone
121-L.
AUCTIONEER
CHAS. E. WALKS—Auctioneer, Urqu
hart Blgd. Phone 278 .
J. P. PAPINEAU, Auctioneer. Phone
Farmers 911x1.
3tf
CREAMERY
MOSCOW CREAMERY—67 cents
paid for butter fat. Ice cream, bulk
and brick in cold storage.
MISCELLANEOUS
ELOCUTION, PUBLIC
and Dramatic Art, individual and
class Instruction for limited number
of pupils. W. H. Bridge, B.A., Ltl.
PJione 113L.
SPEAKING
303-4
'AINTIXO, KALSOMINING, PAPER
HANGING AND SIGNS •
PHONE. 34-J.
CALL 187J for Paper. Hanging, Gal
cimlhicg . Painting. Esti mates free
CROCHETING AND PLAIN SEWING.
, Telephone A70L. ,
ICE AND BOTTLING WORKS —
A. L. Ransom; Phone 242.
AMBULANCE SERVICE.— Phone
285. Glen Grice.
CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP WANTED—Female
WANTED—A GIRL AT THE STAR
Hotel.
3tf
IHBCT» WANTED—Male
WE HAVE A SPLENDID PROPOS 1
tion to offer to anyone with sales
manship ability, to sell ovtr Une of
products in yoür locality. For full
particulars write C.D. Witte, 1121 W.
FtfSt AVe., Spokane, Wash.
WANTED—GENERAL FARM HAND.
A single man for general farm work.
Steady employment to a careful, pains
taking fellow. Must have good refer
ences. A good home and wages as
sured. Apply to N. Williamson. 295tf
1t6
WANTED—MEN WITH TEAMS TO
haul luniber. One trip a day, $5.50
per thousand. Write John C. Oakes.
Kendrick, Idaho.
292-334
WANTED—MEN, WOMEN, BOYS
and girls to pick prunes. Apply at
Washburn & Wilçior store.
289tf
FOR RENT—Rooms
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms. Private
Bath. Phone 9006.
123«
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished
Eggan's apartments.
rooms at
Phone 206H.
231-tf
FOR RENT— Miscellaneous.
WHEAT
Phone 9128.
293tf
FOR RENT—200 ACRES
stubble for sheep.
W. P. Tate.
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR SALE—Farm Lands
80 acres land 3% miles from Viola;
60 acres under plow, balance all good
land; fair house and bam; spring
water; on good road. Price, $85.00
per acre, would trade for a larger
farm.
40 acre ranch 6 miles south of Troy;
14 under plow; 4 room house and
barn; fine water. Price $2600. May
trade for house.
220 acres 8 miles from Moscow, 1%
from station; nearly all under plow;
good buildings; fine water; on good
road, at $90 per acre; terms.
40 acres 6 miles from Moscow; good
buildings and water; on good road,
for $100 per acre; terms on part.
See E. E. Ostroot, over Moscow
Hardware store. Phone 19J.
4-6
Main Street Property at Half Price.
Corner lot 150x125 ft. offered for
quick sale for $1250. Metropolitan In
vestment Co.
308tf
FOR SALE—9-ROOM HOUSE, BATH,
toilet, lights and cellar, all in good
condition, small barn and new garage,
close to paved street. Price for quick
sale, $2800. Immediate possession
given. Metropolitan Investment Co.
_ 308«
FOR SALE OR RENT—3 ACRES IN
city limits, good improvements.
Phone 92Z. 307-312
FOR SALE—A 10-ROOM MODERN
house, cheap; good location. Phone
291«
141R.
FOR SALE—TWO LEVEL LOTS.
One corner lot. Near park. One
block from Third St. Phone 194Z
289-315
FOR SALE—Livestock
FOR SALE—SOME HORSES AND
colts. Call 9049 or see
Brown.
H. C.
300-13
WILLIAMSON HAS FOR SALE—10
cow stancheons with divisions; one
pure bred famous strain Shorthorn
hull, three years old; several head of
young horses,
for appointment.
If interested call 26
293tf
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE—HOLSTEIN BULL, 5
years old, pure bred, registry num
ber 153349; grandson of the King of
the Pontiacs. This animal took second
prize at Washington State fair, at
Yakima. Enquire of Mrs. M. E. Ses
trand, Palouse, Wash.
4-6—39
FOR SALE—1917 FORD CAR, FULLY
equipped with shock absorber, Yale
lock, cut out and foot feed. Phone
904x6. D. L, Procunier.
3-8
FOR SALE CHEAP—ONE 16-IN.
sulky plow and one single disc
drill, Can be seen at 446 B. Eighth
St. *•
3-8
FOR SALE—BLUE PRUSSIAN
pea straw. Baled, fine color. $16
per ton, delivered. Phone 9138. 2-7
FOR SALE—OVERLAND, MAXWELL,
Ford and Calillac cars. All up in
first class shape. R. T. Holder. 308-20
FOR SALE—1918 FORD TOURING
See Harry Smith at Sullivan's
. 308-4
car.
Garage.
FOR SALE—DONAHT'S HOUSE OF
Flowers, one of the best flower
shops in the city of Spokane,
is a great opportunity
wishing to get into the flower busi
ness. As 1 have a large greenhouse in
Coeur d'Alene, which takes all of my
time I am offering this shop for sale.
Price, $8000, half cash, balance to ,
su*t purchaser.
This
for anyone
220 «
WANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—WORK BY" MAN AND
wife. Country preferred. J. Qar
ten, care of J. P. Wedin, Moscow, Ida.
2-7
WANTED—WORK BY WOMAN BY
day or hour. Phone 105R.
S--6
WANTED—A FRESH COW. PHONE
9251.
1-6
MOSCOW
Highway District No. 2 wants 12
four-horse teams, at $1.30 per hour.
Call at highway office over Moscow
State Bank.
TEAMS WANTED
294tf
LOST
LOST—A TRAVELING BAG BE
tween Lewiston and Cornwall, on
Sept. 20th. Reward. Write Frank E.
McBride, Troy, Idaho.
LOST—A TRUCK CHAIN, BETWEEN
- Hagan & Cushing packing plant and
market in town. Reward.
3-6
293«
FOUND
FOUND—A BROWN VELVET CAP.
Owner can have same by calling at
Star-Mirror office.
4
FOUND—OVERCOAT ON MAIN ST.
Phdne 31R.
.4-9
MISCELLAENOUS
CANDY—BIG PAY — ADVERTISE
Men, Women. Start one of our
specialty candy factories in your
home, small room, anywhere. We tel)
how and furnish everything. Grand
opportunity. Candy House, 1819 Ran
stead Rt.. Philadelphia. Pa.
279-317
Rugs Vacuum Cleaned
75c per hour. Laurence E. Huff,
Phone 197. Leave orers at Novelty
Shop
307tf

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