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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, February 11, 1920, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
VOLUME IX
SCHLESWIG PLEBISCITE
VOTED AGIST GERMANY
COPENHAGEN.—(By A. P.)—Latest reports on the plebiscite yesterday
in Schleswig show that Denmark secured 72,733 votes against 27,793 for Ger
many. Only a few districts have not been heard from.
(The vote was as to
whether Schleswig should become a part of Denmark or of Germany.—Ed.)
"Clown" Prince Acted Before He Thought.
(By A. P.)—Former Crown Prince Wilhelm sent the tele
gram to heads of allied governments offering to surrender instead of Ger
mane whose extradition was demanded "almost on the impulse of a moment"
according to an interview with Major von Mulheim, the former crown prince's
adjutant, published in The Telegraf, yesterday.
And Uncle Sam Did Not Answer "Present".
AMSTERDAM,
LONDON.— (By A. P.)—The council of the league of nations met today
In the historic picture gallery of St. James palace. Leon Bourgeois, French
delegate, delivered the opening address.
Russians Sink Heavily Loaded Ship.
LONDON.—(By A. P.)—A Moscow soviet government wireless message to
day says: "According to a message from Novo Hossisk, when the volunteer
transport, Karantin, with officers and officials and their wives and children
numbering 1400 left Mariupol (in the Russian province of Yekaterinoslav)
on the approach of the Bolsheviki, the volunteer army, incensed at being
left behind, fired on the ship. A shell pierced the boiler and the transport
sank with all on board.
Chemical Factory Workers Strike.
MILAN, Italy.—(By A. P.)—Two hundred thousand employes of chemical
factories struck Tuesday for higher wages.
Lodge Reintroduces Peace Treaty.
WASHINGTON.—(By A. P.)—The peace treaty reservations as revised tent
atlvely In recent unofficial bipartisan conferences, was formally presented In
the
STATE PEEPAEES T» ISTBODÜOElî
ALLEGED CONFESSION OF •
LOREN ROBERTS
MONTESANO, Wash.—(By A. P.)—,
What is purported to be a confession
of Loren Roberts, one of the 11 al- j
leged I. W. W- being tried here for
murder in connection with the armis- j
tice day shootings at Centralia, was.
brought into court today.
A. C. Baker, deputy county clerk, j
and court reporter of Thurston County,,
was. called by the state to testify
ceming the taking of the statement, as
a preliminary to offering the pur
ported statement in evidence.
Man Found in Hall« Witness.
T. C. Morgan, who was found in- 1
the
purpose.
He was
side the I. W. W. hall shortly after
the shootings, will be among
state's principal witnesses; prose
cution counsel admitted that Mor
gan was here for that
Since the day of the shootings Mor
gan has been a prisoner in the Lewis
county jail at Chehalis.
brought here last night. In the
original information against the
alleged perpetrators of the shooting,
Morgan was named as a defendant,
but his name was withdrawn when
the amended information was filed.
At the time of his capture he was in
the I. W. W. hall with Ray Becker,
one of those now on trial.
W. R- Patton, a state's witness, in
explaining that he had found eight
shells on Seminary hill, could pro-1
duce only seven of them for ex
hibition purposes. He explained that
young son had used the other for
a whistle. Members of the families
of several of the men were visitors
in court, including the wives of O. C.
Bland and John Lamb, and the moth-1
ers of Bert Faulkner and Loren
T. A. Simard, American Legion
member of Chehalis, who assisted iu
rounding up the men in the I. W. W.
hall after the shooting, told of the I
capture of Mike Sheehon, Ray Becker, I
James Mclnerney and T. C. Morgan |
in an ice box in the rear of the I.
E. J. Lindlay, Centralia billposter, |
told of finding the disputed 3-685 j
rifle behind a billboard he was paint- ,
ing, together with three boxes of |
shells. He turned it over to the |
sheriff, he said, explaining that he
had met C. D. Cunningham, one of I
the attorneys for the state, on the 1
his
Roberts.
W. W. hall.
day he had found the rifle and that |
Cunningham had said that he had |
been looking for such a high-power
ed rifle.
I
I
AT ASHTON, FEBRUARY 22

ASHTON, .Ida.—Ashton's fourth an
nual dog race will be held February j
Washington's
IDAHO DOG RACE
birthday.
23
This
year's races promise to be the best j
yet held and are attracting wide at-j
tentlon. ;
Probably the most interesting of this
year's activities is the entry of Miss 1
Gladys Aberhansley, 18, who is con
ceded to be the best woman dog racer j
in the United States. Miss Aberhans- 1
ley is a true daughter of the west, hav- '
ing been born near Ashton. "Ted"
Kent, winner of the 1917 and 1919 I
races will also be a contestant this
year, entering his former string of (
I
j
winners.
Mining Convention at Spokane.
SPOKANE, Wash.—The program
has been issued for the northwest
mining convention at Spokane Febru
ary 16-19. • Large delegations are ex
pected from four states and Canada
and the program is unusually inter
esting. The convention will be held
in the Moorish room at the Spokane
hotel.
1
1 T , * ** * '* , ? , * , * , '? , ***Ti
I j. üÂtot? /T? n ' S ^ a Session. <■
|. t , BOISE.—(By A. P.) The *
* Idah ° legislature convened at * ;
- ?i° on today ln . s P e eial session for ♦
. Î;! 16 P ur POse of ratifying the na- 4* j
. L! 0 .. suffrage amendment. As 4*
* this is the only business before 4- j
" "■*
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1
QUARTER OF BILLION' FEET
THAT WILE BE POOLED AND
SOLD SOON
OWNERS HOE HEEPEO
bers of Benewah county, at a meeting
held here by the Hangman Valley Tim
ber Owners' association, learned from
United States forest service logging
engineers that 260,000,000 feet of tim
ber were available in the area ap
praised for the association, and that
83 per cent of this timber was yellow
pine of good quality.
Logging conditions were reported
excellent and the topography decided
favorable for a logging railroad.
The association accordingly decid
ed to place the timber on the market
the next 90 days.
One hundred of the 200 timber own
ers of the Hangman valley attended
the meeting. The forest service re
port was presented by j, j. Girard
DE SMOT, Ida.
Farm bureau mem
and U. S. Schwartz,
The Hangman Valley Timber Own
1 ers' association was formed under
' auspices of the Benewah county farm
j bureau to enable homesteaders to dis
1 pose of timber on their land,
I "One of the duties with which the
forest service is charged by congress,"
says a statement from County Agent
F. I. Rockwell, "is to foster the con
servation of young timber, and thus
aid in extending the supply for the
future. And it is primarily to en
courage and aid the homesteaders in
protecting this young timber that the
forest
them. That is the reason the time of
|the appraisers was given."
Many of the claims in Hangman
basin contain large quantities
small timber suitable for poles, poets,
ties, pulpwood or fuel. The forest
service, it is announced, plans
help the owners prepare a contract
by which this material will be saved.
• -
MOTION PICTURES OF
CRIMINALS TO BE TAKEN
service is cooperating with
of
to
SALT LAKE CITY.—The local po
ilice department rogues gallery may
be changed into a moving studio as the
fresult of inquiries sent to various Pa
|cific Coast cities concerning the film
ing of law breakers instead of taking
still photographs. Chief of Police D.
a. White of San Francisco has in
formed the local department the new
system has been tried out there and
was found to produce wonderful
suits.
re
Every motion and characteristic act
of the criminal is recorded by the new
method and it is said to make it. much
easier for detectives to recognize ot
fenders. In the past it has been pos
sible for a criminal to so alter his
natural expression in a still picture
that recognition by the photograph in
real life was almost impossible. The
apparatus, originated by Thomas Ince,
famous Culver City, Calif., producer,
is said to be inexpensive and not com
plicated.
I. W. W. Convicted.
Chelan county jurors only took five
minutes to arrive at a verdict of
guilty in the case of seven I. W. W.'s
charged with being members of a
criminal organization under the law
of the state of Washington. The
diet was unanimous.
ver
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11,192ft
a
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Monument of Waste
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OF THE BOY SCOUTS
~
SCOUTMASTER HAWLEY HAS A
CONFERENCE WITH CHIEF
SCOUT EXECUTIVE WEST
This week is the tenth annivers
ar y of the organization of the Boy
Scouts of America and National
Good Turn week. Many of the big
magazines are giving space to the
g cou t Good Turn and with them we
are urging that everybody do at least
one ood turn to some one e]se this
*•*■
The Moscow Boy Scouts have been
delayed in their anniversary week
plans 011 account of the influenza
but as far as conditions will allow
they intend to carry out the program.
Scoutmaster F. D. Hawley was in
Spokane Monday to meet with the
chief scout executive, James E. West,
who is making a tour of the country
in the interests of scouting. Mr.
West, in speaking to men interested
in scouting at the Davenport Monday
noon, stated that scouting has become
one of the most important single
agencies for the teaching of Ameri
canism in the couhtry. He said that
in the United States there were 10
million aliens with 21 million de
pendents, a total of 31 million of peo
ple who must be reached by Ameri
canizing influences if this country is
to become a unit in loyalty to Ameri
can ideals and institutions. He went
on to say that while the schools were
doing splendid work that in New
York state alone there were but 40,
000 out of 300,000 boys over 16 who
went to any kind of school and that
nearly half the boys had quit school
before the
churches did not reach a great per
cent of them with patriotic teachings
and that the boy scouts offered a
great opportunity for this service in
the nation. He said that scouting
had at present influenced about one
twelve;
the
were
tenth of the boys, and that at pres
ent there were 376,000 registered
scouts and 106,000 men in scouting.
The Field Scout Commissioner for
the western district, Mr. Miller,
spoke encouragingly regarding a
commissioner for the northwest with
headquarters at Portland. This will
give scouting more expert advice and
encouragement in this section;
One of the most interesting dem
onstrations of practical scouting was
given by the Spokane scout firemen.
There are some 160 scout firemen in
Spokane, and they are trained to
eliminate all danger of fire in their
own homes and in those of the neigh
bors. Each scout is given a district
to cover and the Spokane fire chief
said that owing directly to the watch
fulness of these scouts, the number
of false alarm turned in had been
duced from 17 In January a year ago
to 2 last January. The scouts gave
some fine short talks of firemanship
for Mr. West's benefit and displayed
an excellent training in modern fire
control training.
Moscow scouts have just completed
their second year's work and
planning on a public jinks as soon
as possible. There will be room in
the troop for seven or eight
boys as Mr. Hawley wishes to
ganize two new patrols who will take
up the beginnings of scouting under
his personal guidance,
boys are getting together equipment
for advanced scouting under the Pine
Tree system, and will be trained in
this work by Assistant Scout Master
A. M. Piper, who was trained in this
work by Chief Scout Master Wilder.
Any boys twelve years old who
wish to take up scouting should ap
ply to Mr. Hawley at
re
are
more
or
The older
once.
Lockett To Penitentiary.
Ky.—Under guard
of federal troop, William Lockett,
negro, convicted murderer of Geneva
Hardman, 10 years old, who at his
trial yesterday was sought by a mob
that rushed the courthouse and
suited in the loss of five lives when
state troops fired upon the rioters,
was removed to the penitentiary at
Eddyville tonight. A special train
carried hipi to the prison, where he
was to be placed in the death cell,
his electricution having been set for
March 11.
LEXINGTON
re
Spokane Pioneer Answers Call.
SPOKANE, Wash.—Warren Hus
sey, aged 83, pioneer banker of Spo
kanç and the Coeur d'Alenes, is dead.
He was among the first to join the
rush into the Murray gold field in
1884 and subsquently was identified
with the banking interests here for
more than 35 years.
WILLAMETTE WON
FROM COUGAR LIVE
OREGO.N TEAM DEFEATED BY
IDAHO, 42 to 21. Beats W. S. C.
27 TO 22
PULLMAN.—Willamette
univer
sity's basket ball team last night (
defeated the Washington State Col- 1
lege five in a nonconference game, ;
27 to 22. The state college team was :
made up entirely of second string 1
men, none of the seven players ma
king the recent coast trip with the 1
varsity quintett getting into the con- !
test.
McKittrick proved the leading j
point getter for the winners, scor- :
ing six field goals and five points on J
free throws. Nash led the Cougars I
with four field goals.
The game was played behind closed j
doors because of the influenza ban I
prohibiting a crowd.
The W. S. C. freshmen five lost to •,
the Pullman high school team in five !
minutes overtime, 22 to 20. Me
Carthy of the high school five scored
20 of his team's 22 points. Sorenson
and Roberts starred for the frosh.
THp I inpnn
P
I
W. S. C. (22))
Douglas ,
Nash ...
Carl King
Gillis ...
Burgess
Willamette (27)
Gillette
Forward
, Forward.... Wapato
Jackson
. Rarey
Dimmick
Substitutions— W. S. C.: Rathburn
for Burgess, Krepps for Douglas,
Fenn for Rathburn. Willamette—Mc
Kittick for Gillete.
Center
Guard.
Guard.
- -, ,
te ÄÄ-F?eld goalÄ*et
trick 6 Jackson 4 W f pato
, throws-McKittrick 5 out of 9 at
I t prnn fq
! 1 _
Nash 4, Douglas 2, King 1, Burgess
1. Free throws—Nash 4 out of 7 at
SCn OF SEED
IN IDAHO FEARER
FARMERS WARNED OF CONDI
TIONS AND ADVISED TO SE
CURE SEED EARLY
Good seed will be scarce this year,
and Idaho growers will find them
selves confronted with a big short
age at planting time, according to B.
F. Sheehan, field agronomist of the
university extension division.
To facilitate the distribution of
whatever supply of seed there may be,
Mr. Sheehan has devised a scheme of
farm bureau cooperation by which
seed will be listed for sale, the in
formation to be made public through
the newspapers, the weekly markets
bulletin of the state department of
agriculture and the farm
Data is to be collected by the county
agricultural agents and is to include
the following information:
seed, variety, price, amount, and ad
dresses of persons having the seed for
sale.
Names of persons wishing to buy
seed also will be taken, together with
the kind of seed wanted, the variety,
the amount and the address of the
applicant.
Stocks in the hands of various firms
also are to be listed.
bureaus.
Kind of
Colville Main Street Paved.
Colville paved its main street last
fall, no small Undertaking because
of the unusual width of the thorough
fare. Apparently the result
eminently satisfactory, as the city
has now decided to proceed with five
additional blocks of paving and two
miles of concrete sidewalk.
was
NUMBER lid
YET EUR FROM SETTLEMENT
WASHINt ION—(By A. P.)—Director General Hines conferred with At
torney General Palmer today on the threatened railroad strike situation.
Palmer refused to discuss the conference except to say he had been made
acquainted with the situation. He denied that the department of justice con
templates action.
He would not say that the department would not eventually
take a hand in the controversy.
Hines Will Answer and Wilson May Approve.
Director General Hines will answer the demands of 2,000,000 railroad work
ers on his own responsibility from the railroad administration's standpoint,
and then report to President Wilson, it was said at the White House today.
President Wilson will then approve or disapprove his decision. Conferences
between Hines and brotherhood officers were to have been resumed this
morning but neither side was ready and the meeting was postponed until
3 p. m.
Oil Land Leasing Bill Completed.
WASHINGTON.—(By A, P.)—Enactment of the oil land leasing bill was
completed today with the senate's adoption of the conference report. The
bill now goes to the president.
This terminates a 10 years' fight. The bill provides for the leasing and
development of government-owned oil, coal, gas, phosphates, sodium, and oil
shale lands by private enterprises and affects approximately 76,000,000 acres
of the public domain, principally in western states.
INTIMIDATED" WITNESS BY
HANGING HIM, CHARGED
NASHVILLE, Tenu.— Sheriff A. P.
I Warren, his wife, May, and Floyd
j Cummings, were held under $16,000
I bonds at Cookeville, today to await
trial on charges of intimidating a
United States witness, Fred Mur
phy, whose body was found hanging
in the jail at McMinnville, January
24. John Rufus Rains, 18 years old,
was held in $1000 bonds. Murphy
was to have been a witness in pro
ceedings against Sheriff Warren,
charged with operating a "moon
shine" still.
I
CONTRACTS FOR 1,000 OUNCES
FOR LATAH COUNTY MEM
BERS—CAN GET MORE
. , „ ,. . ,
hundred ™nces of saccharine to be
us f d . m T ** '^ m Pa>gn, a fp ln ^ squir
rels m Latah county during the com
in S season ; Prices secured are $1.63
P. er ou " c ° fü / strychnine in five ounce
tins, $1.68 for single ounces, and 35
cents per ounce for sacchrine. Ad
ditional poison supplies will be pur
chased if this becomes necessary.
These poison supplies will be dis
tributed to farm bureau members and
other interested farmers in communi
ties that have a serious squirrel pro
blem and adopt squirrel control as a
farm bureau project. Practically
every community in Latah county
that is organized for farm bureau
The Latah County Farm Bureau
has contracted for one thousand
ounces of strychnine alkaloid and two
work has taken up squirrel control as
one of the principal lines of work.
The plan for distribution will be to
hold poison mixing meetings and
demonstrations in all interested com
munities. Farmers will bring their
oats to the meeting and the poison
will be mixed there. A supply of
good grade muslin sacks bearing a
poison label and warning has been se
cured, so that each farmer can carry
away his poison oats in a secure and
labeled sack. While it ig expected
that all interested parties, will attend
the general community meeting and
secure their supplies at that time, ar
rangements will be made so that
farmers who cannot attend or who
find that they need additional sup
plies may get poisoned bait or sup
plies from the farm bureau squirrel
project leader of their community.
This plan has been in use for a
number of years in some of the coun
ties of Idaho and excellent results
have been secured.
MAY FORM IDAHO-UTAH
BASEBALL LEAGUE
OGDEN, Utah.—Steps for the forma
tion of a Utah-Idaho baseball league
to include Ogden, Logan and Brigham
City, Utah, and three Idaho towns are
being fostered by local diamond en
thusiasts.
Logan now is in the Cache valley
league and won the 1919 pennant In
that organization but is said to be dé
sirions of entering the proposed Utah- I
Idaho league. Mayor Prank Francis,]
of Ogden, is an ardent booster for the !
proposed league and expresses be- |
lief that if established It will prove
1
j
j
j
I
success.
Old Veterinarian Is Dead.
Wash.—Dr.
Anderson, said to be the first vet
erinariay surgeon in Spokane, is dead
at Stites, Idaho. He arrived here in
1883 and was in and about the city
for the next 20 years. Many Spo
kane pioneers will remember the
late Dr. Anderson, who latterly was
president of the Stites Trading com
pany.
Robert !
SPOKANE,
Big Hauls of Diamonds.
SEATTLE.—(By A. P.)—Diamonds,
which the owners claim were worth
$20.000 to $23,000 were stolen in two
robberies here last night.
LOS ANGELES BANK
ROBBERS ARRESTED
ONE OF ROBBERS AN ESCAPED
CONVICT FROM THE WALLA
WALLA PENITENTIARY
LOS ANGELES—(By A. P.) —
Three of the four young men who
yesterday robbed the Vermont street
branch of the Home Savings Bank of
$7,000 cash and $3,000 in checks, are
held here today.
The police say that all three admit
participating in the robbery. Joe
Carney, one of the prisoners, told the
police, they said, that he was form
erly a convict in the Washington pen
itentiary for burglary and escaped.
Robbers Did Quick Work.
Three hours after four youthful
bandits, all unmasked, had held up
and robbed the Vermont Avenue
branch of the Home Savings bank
here of cash and checks totaling more
than $11,000, Charles Scott, age 28,
under arrest as ■ one of the rob
was
bers and nearly a fourth of the
money stolen had been recovered.
The robbery was executed in less
than five minutes while the bank was
filled with customers. The quartet
drove up in a small automobile and
three of them stepped into the bank
unnoticed while the fourth remained
on guard outside.
Walla Walla Confirms Story.
WALLA WALLA, Wash.—(By A.
P.)—Charles Norton, alias Joe Car
ney, was sentenced from Spokane
county in 1912 on a charge of rob
bery.
SCORES CONGRESS
LAUNCH CAMPAIGN TO ELECT
CONGRESSMEN FAVORABLE
TO UNION LABOR
Organized
labor's campaign to elect a congress
friendly to it, was opened formally
today by Samuel Gompers, president
and J. A. O'Connell, vice president, of
the American Federation of Labor, in
addresses before a shipbuilders trade
convention here. Both speakers vig
orously assailed the present congress
as "the most reactionary in the his
tory of this country" and declared
that from it labor need expect not
the slightest assistance in the shape
of "remedial legislation."
Inviting the representatives of 500
000 shipyard workers present to join
the federation in its fight to "reward
our friends and defeat our enemies,"
Mr. Gompers promised them every
assistance of his organization in
forcing the government to continue
the wartime ship construction pro
gram to its logical conclusion, giving
the United States the "greates mer
chant marine in the world."
"We propose to move ahead, no
matter what obstacle is placed in our
way," said Mr. Gompers. "The labor
movement can not stand still; it must
of necessity, progress."
WASHINGTON.
_ * , . ...
Due . to ,, the iatlaenza . quarantine
a»?'' ln tle \ ni J erslt ,^ £ f
Idaho and the illness of Russell T.
Scott, manager and baritone soloist,
who is suffering with influenza, the
much looked for University of Idaho
Male Glee club concert to, have been
jheld in the auditorium Friday night
has been indefinitely postponed until
health conditions are lietter.
After a triumphant tour of south
ern Idaho where the club concerts
were greeted with crowded and en
thusiastic houses, the Friday night
concert wâs looked forward to with,
considerable pleasure.
GLEE CLUB CONCERT
ILLS BEEN' POSTPONED
• Flour Takes Second Drop.
MINNEAPOLIS,* Minn.—(By A. P.)
—For the second time in a week flour
dropped 50 cents a barrel here to-,
day.

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