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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, February 23, 1920, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
VOLUME IX
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2.% 192«
X UMBER 18«
REVOLT AGAINST
IRON COUNTY, MICHIGAN, OFFI
ClALS REBEL AGAINST FED
ERAL ENFORCEMENT
CRYSTAL FALLS, Mich.—(By A.
P.)—The situation in Iron county is I
reported quiet today following reve- I
nue agents' report of an incipent
whiskey insurrection here. No new
developments have occurred.
Will Arrest County Officers.
CHICAGO, Ill.—(By A. P.)—Major
A. V. Dalrymple, federal prohibition
director of six central states, gather
ed 80.picked agents here today pre
paratory to leading an expedition into
Iron county, Michigan, to arrest the
county officials who are said to have
interfered with the federal liquor raid
last week.
Charge Open Rebellion.
CHICAGO, Ill.—A
rebellion
against prohibition" has broken out
In Iron county, Michigan, and the
-county, led by its prosecuting attor
ney, is in "open revolt" against fed
eral authority, Major A. L. Dalrymple
federal prohibition director for »the
central states, notified Washington
today.
Prohibition agents leading a party
of Michigan state constables were
held up Feb. 19 by Iron county offici
als and wine they had confiscated
was taken away from them according
to word brought to Chicago by Leo
J. Grove of Marquette, supervising
prohibition agent for the upper pen
insula.
Major Dalrymple appealed to At
torney General Palmer, through As
sistant Prohibition Director Gaylord,
to order warrants issued for the ar
rest of the prosecutor, two deputy
* sheriffs, two police officers and three
other residents of Iron River, a min
ing village.
County Authority Explains.
IRON RIVER, Mich.—"The people
up in this country are entitled to
protection and they are going to get
it, so long as it is within my power
to give it to them."
Such was the reply made tonight by
Prosecuting Attorney P. A. McDon
ough of Iron County, when he learn
ed that Major A. V. Dalryiriple, pro
hibition director of the central states
had declared Iron county "in. open re
volt" against federal authority.
Prosecutor McDonough said he
would more than welcome the federal
officer with a warrant for his arrest
and that it would not require an
armed expedition of dry agents and
Michigan state police-to make the
arrest.
"The best thing they could do (s to
swear out a warrant for ' my arrest
and try to prosecute," he said. "K |
would be he best thing for me and '
for the people, for we would then J
learn whether or not the laws of this /
kind are to be enforced and whether i
or not the people are entitled to pro
action as well as prosecution, at the
hands of their officers."
Dalrymple Leads Invaders.
CHICAGO.—(By A. P.)— Major
V. Dalrymple, federal prohibition
' " for six central states,
commissioner
received word today that telegraphic
authorization to lead an armed ex
pedition of United States agents into
the upper peninsula of Michigan, had
been sent from Washington. With
about 30 picked men he will leave
Chicago at 6 p. m. for Negaunee,
Michigan,. where the force of Michi
gan constabulary will join them.
IKON SENK
POLLUTES STREAM
WA8HIXGT0X STATE HEALTH OF
FICERS BJEUXG OUR SEWER IN
TO CONTROVERSY
Mosgow's sewer system has become
a matter of controversy* across the
state line in Washington. J. K.
Smawley, owner of a small farm just
below Pullman, near the septic tank
below that town,' has brought suit
against the city because of the alleg
ed noxious odors arising fro the tank
which is but a few hundred feet from
Smawley's residence. Pullman city.
Whitman county and Washington state
health officers have been investigat
ing the case.
J. E. Plenry, M. D., director of the di
vision of communicable diseases, for
the Washington state board of health,
investigated the conditions there and
says, in part, 'in his report to Dr. J.
B. Anderson, state health officer ;
"First—That this odor was not
sufficient to cause any detriment
whatever to the health of the ad
joining property owners.
"Second—That the stream receiv
ing the effluent from this tank, liv
ing been already thoroughly, con
taminated by receiving the sewage
of the city of Moscow, In Idaho,
some eight or ten miles up stream,
would be only additionally contami
nated by receiving the sewage efflu
enty of the Pullman septic tank.
"Third — That this stream, both as
it flows through the city of Pullman
above the outlet of the Pullman sep
tic tank and as it flows away into
the country below this outlet, is
dangerous to bathe In and as a
source of drinking water.
UTAH AGRICULTURAL
COLLEGE RAISES SALARIES
LOGAN, Utah.—Salary increases
of five per cent to teachers on the reg
ular staff and ten per cent to workers
on the extension staff have been grant
ed by the board of trustees of the Utah
Agricultural College here. The wage
advances were given to meet increased
living costs.
WORK IS APPALLING
LONDON NEWSPAPER SEES DARK
OUTLOOK IN REORGANIZA
TION OF EUROPE
LONDON.—The vastness of the task
of reconstructing continental Europe
seems appalling to the Saturday Re
view.
"We are about to witness," it says,
"the spectacle of Central and Eastern
Europe being handed over to some
24 international mixed bodies called
commissions. As each commission has
on an average seven members, with
an attendant army of clerks and secre
taries, the reign of the official is like
ly to be expensive and prolonged.
Under the Treaty of Versailles the fol
lowing 24 commissions must be ap
pointed forthwith:
"To^etermine the new frontier be
tween Germany and Belgium, trace
the frontiers of the Saar Basin, govern
the Saar Basin, apportion the stock in
the Saar Basin, administer the prov
ince of the central Rhine, delimit the ■
frontiers of Czecho-Slovakia, de- I
S'l.TpSrX« "Si
evacuation of Upper Silesia and take
over its government, take over East
Prussia after evacuation, administer j
the Plebiscite area of Stuhm, Rosen-|
burg and Manenhurg, for the dehm-,
Ration of the free city of Danzig, take
the plebiscite of Sleswiz, determine the
boundaries of Slerswig, reduce the Qer
man army, the Naval conmiission the
Air Force Commission, Repatriation
Commission, Clearance of Debts Com
mission, Insurance Commission, Elbe
Commission, for the navigation and j
management, Order Commission, Nie- ,
men Commission, Danube Commission, I
and the Reparation Commission." |
The latter the Saturday Review de- ,
scribes as "the greatest of all, with |
the task of skinning Germany alive for ;
"In e addRion a to the'above/' ^Re- i
view cohtinued, "there is to be set up [
an International Labor Office, and a
permanent Court of International Jus- i
tice. How long will this vast cobweb
of internation-officials endure? Until
the next war, possibly./' i
'
I
I
I
;
j
j
I
PLAN TO SHORTEN
SEASON TO BE REDUCED BY
STARTING STOCK ON RANGES
LATER IN SPRING
WASHINGTON, D. C. — Early,
spring grazing on western ranges
has so materially reduced the carry
ing capacity and forage resources
that the forest service, United States
department of agriculture, has found
it necessary on many of the national
forestä to shorten the present graz
ing season from two to four weeks.
This cut will be put into effect this
spring.
"It is the purpose of the forest
service," states an official in charge
of grazing, "to place the live-stock
industry on the national forests on
substantial, permanent basis. To
this it is necessary to produce a max
imum cover of vegetation on
rangea. The first precaution is
avoid too early grazing. Every stock
man interested in his business knows
that forage plants cannot be grazed
the instant they begin to show above
the S roun d- Such early spring use
of the range not only decreases the
density and luxuriance of plant
growth, but also reduces the carrying
capacity and the fertility of the soil,
and if continued, ultimately results
in waste range.
. _ 8 . , ,
Studies carried on at the Great
Basin Experiment station In Utah
have proved that where plants are
continually cut back or cropped, the
root system loses its vitality and the
plant soon dies. On some of the na
tional forest ranges, which are grazed
early and heavily, the forage plants
are showing similar signs of serious
damage, and will rapidly go from bad
to worsé if remedial measures are not
put in force. The old grasses, with
their root systems weakened by re
peated cropping, are almost extermin
ated and are being replaced by worth
less weeds. Erosion of the soil has
also started in many places and
threatens serious damage. Experi
ments have shown that off a ten
acre tract, heavily ^overgrazed, as
much as 26 tons of earth and rock
have frequently been washed down
after a few minutes of heavy rains.
These are some of the things which
follow in the wake of too early use
of the range and from overgrazing.
"A grazing season that starts later
the spring, thus giving the forage
plants a chance to develop, and more
careful management of the range,
will do much toward bettering and
eventually eliminating such condi
tions."
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shipping harbor there, following a revolution which broke out there Satur- ;
day afternoon, according to Lloyd's dispatch from Verdo, Norway. i
Tim news was brought by a Russian steamer, the only vessel which escaped, i
« "■> «--*> with m.CJne S un „re the cepje.e «.. weend.a.
Denekme's forces Recapture ix round. j
The recapture from the Boisheviki of Rostov-on-the-Don by Denekine's .
f orc6S j g reported by the British military mission in South Russia today. The !
captured Friday, with 1500 prisoners and 22 guns.
u „ , , ' „ w ...
England and Italy Mant Peace With Boisheviki. ,
Premiers Lloyd George and Nitti, of Italy, are believed to favor a resump
t i on 0 f relations with soviet Russia although Premier Millerand, of France,
j not inclined to agree to any immediate action, according to the Daily Mall,
6 ' n , strike _
Welch Coal Mines Closed By Strike.
FORTH, Wales.—(By A. P.)—Thirty thousand miners struck today in the
colleries of Rhondda Valley. The shut down is almost complete. They struck
to en ( orce the demands for dismisal of the check weighman and settle
. . „„
m ent of a case in which it is alleged a miner was victimized.
Senate Expected to Pass Railroad Bill Soon. ;
WASHINGTON.—(By A. P.)—The conference report on the railroad bill
p asse( j Saturday night by the house, was called up in the senate today by
Senator Cummins, chairman of the interstate commerce committee who oh
tained unanimous consent for its immediate consideration. Its speedy adop- j
tion is predicted,
LONDON.—(By A. P.)—Boisheviki forces have seized Murmansk and the
Railroad Unions Oppose Wilson's Plan.
WASH1NGTON.—(By A. P.)—President Wilson's proposal for the settle- j
ment of the railroad wage controversy and the compromise railroad bill now
pending in the senate, were bitterly assailed in conference here today by rail
road union officials and grievance committeemen called to Washington to
discuss the president's settlement policy.
Hoover Wants Treaty Ratified.
BALTIMORE.— (By A. P.)—Former Food Administrator Hoover declared
today in an address at Johns Hopkins university, his opposition to making'
the ratification of the peace treaty an issue in the presidential election
campaign. He insisted it will "obscure our pressing domestic issues by
a conflict over a question on which the country has already made up its
mind."
SPOKANE ADOPTS
:
I
a
do
Spokane is going to adopt the Mos
to C ow method of presenting reading re
1 hearsals of standard modem plays as
| conveninent means of sunnlvimr
theatric entertainment to its tom
mud j. rp be Drama Club also wel
comes ' tbe opportunity of exhibiting
a samp j e 0 f work on Tuesday
n - ^ j bg production of "The
^ £ be extension workers
j- rutn ' to tne extension workers
from various parts of the state who
J 111 . be visiting at the University
during the week.
, <rr , „
„ ^he Truth' ».the firs.t of a senes
,°. dealing With American home
1 ^ American playwrights which
î he Club wil produce during the next
1 ^°, mo " ths - P 1S be followed by
l. Wh y M « rr y> a discussion of the
| *°°P revale £t institution of divorce
1 bumerour, however, in its treatment;
Her Own, Money which settles
gestion as to who should con
^<>1 the pay-roll, the wife or the hus
a '
Clyde Fitch, the author of "The
Truth," is considered one of the best
American dramatists. Of his long
"st of works, many of which are
translations of foreign plays, "The
Truth" has been selected as most
representative of his studies of
American life. His Interest appears
divided between his leading charact
er > Becky, who was so well played in
thls country by Grace George, and
bhe idea—which traces the evolution
of a fib. It may have been a white
one to start with, but it ends as
black as night. "If you can inculcate
a u idea in your play," wrote Fitch,
I "so much the better for your play,
aud for you and for your audience."
Fitch also knows his audience well
enough to end his play happily.
"THE TRUTH" TO BE PRESENT
ED BY HOME DRAMA CLUB
TUESDAY NIGHT
satisfaction a news-story in the
Spokesman-Review of last Friday to
the effect that the Drama Club of
The local Drama Club read with
. T j
a nd ot her impressions ot Uondon
aQ d Paris. The children of the refu
gees and the French children seemed
greatly undernourished, many of
mem oeing afflicted with rickets and
a large percentage suffering from
tuberculosis. During an epidemic of
{influenza the undernourished refu
Sees seemed to escape when the bet
le r fed French peopie succumbed.
. * f
Dr. Gilchrist told of the célébra
tion ot the signing ot the armistice,
which lasted tor days in France.
rpt t? , .. . , , .
The French people are divided in
four classes.
The home job is the broadest of
all ' labors for its branches of work
covers many departments. One of the
reasons that the rural life should
be brought to its best development,
is that it is the normal place tor the
rearing of children.
There are 18 women in the evten
„j 0 work of Idaho
' ,
R-elly stated that those who
'*ve nearest our great university
often fail to appreciate its advant
a & es - How often that is true. Peo
P, e come many miles to attend
farmers' and Housekeepers' week,
while those within a few miles of
Moscow often fail to attend or take
an y interest in the splendid dem
onstrations given at their very door,
WOMAN PHYSICIAN TELLS OF
HER EXPERIENCES ON THE
BATTLE FRONTS
Friday afternoon, Dr. V. M. Gil
christ gave a talk on her work
abroad at the Historical Club. She
spoke interestingly of the trip across
Miss Amy Kelly of the home eco
nomics departmenc of the University
gave an instructive address on the
extension work for the women of
Idaho. The success of tne agriculture
of the state depends on good condi
tions in the home. Agriculture is im
portant for it produces the raw ma
terial that ia me basis of all other
occupations.
Nevada Fur Shipments Heavy.
CARSON CITY, Nev.—Fur ship
ments from Nevada to other parts of
the United States has been extremely
heavy this season, according to W. C.
Grover, state game warden. Especial
ly large shipments of beaver and
muskrat pelts by trappers in Humbolt
and Elko counties are being made, he
said.
TEXTILE MAKERS
ARE PROFITEERING
DIVIDENDS DECLARED RECENT
LY SHOW WHY RETAIL
PRICES ARE HIGH
BOSTON.—The reason why shirts
and other comon fabrics have been
costing from two to three times as
much as in prewar times, suavily at
tributed to "increased labor and other
production costs," may be explained
in large measure by the huge quart
quar
earnings
erly dividends just declared by New
England cotton mill corporations.
Quarterly dividens running
high as 20 per cent or 80 per cent
a year have been voted by boards of
directors to stockholders and while
government investigators and other
seekers for facts connected with the
high cost of wearing clothes have
been gunning after retailers, the fab
ric producers have been quietly "get
ting theirs" the while production
costs has been explained
above.
li
Dividend 70 Per Cent,
One concern, the King Philip mills
°f Fall River, Mass., in addition to
53 "
extra dividend of 50 per cent, bring
ing the rate upon its capital stock to
70 per cent for the year,
Thirty-nine Fall River cotton mill
corporations have this week declared
quarterly dividends of $2,385,338.50
The quarterly dividends rangé from
1 1-2 per cent to 20 per cent and
average for the 39 concerns 7.73
plus per cent, or about 27 per cent
a y 6a r.
These dividends which smashed all
records for high profits started
tailers wondering when the govern
ment's calcium lights would be turn
ed off their establishments and di
rected toward the King Philip mills
corporation, with its 5 per cent
terly and 50 per cent extra divi
d ^j ts th | 0
dendj and others wboge ^
away as
an
re
have broken records.
If it was not for greatly increas
ec * volume of business many retail
^f le ™° t " day be "Whe™^tt/governme^t
tackles the retailers it attacks
... pro
fiteermg from the wrong end. This is
a sellers market' and today
Jhatstn Sr h?n With
we ap
our.
GILLS FOG BIDS OB
CLEIRIITED HIGHWAY
1 BIDS TO BE RECEIVED UP TO
SATURDAY FOR CONSTRUCT
ING ROAD NEAR GREER
■ No country presents more difficult
j problems to the highway engineer
i J-han the mountains of northern Ida
] "?■, 1116 Nez Perce and Clearwater
hl * h ^ a f s , both f rve a fertile country
la 9^ s only proper transporta
ï ° n îf CI1 A les bud development,
^ be Nez Perce highway runs through
,.°^ r "Little Big,"^ the
Mitchell, the Maggie, an d "Law
yers Canyon." The (Jlearwater high
| w has t0 climb Greer huj
both ro ads the maximum grade has
open u™*. j„ wn .. f , f 1 "?
oeen kept down to the standard 5
per cent prescribed by the bureau of
public roads for all xederal aid
! flgures -
Flan State Natatorlnm.
POCATELLO, Ida.—Final plans for
the constructi °n of a mamouth state
natatorlnm at Lava Hot spring, Idaho,
are being worked out and it is ex
pected the project will be completed
by May 15. The last Idaho legislature
passed an act providing for the erec
tion of the plunge which will be'mod
ern in all respects. The main swim
ming tank will be 50x160 feet and priv
ate pools and dressing rooms also will
be provided. Admission to the plunge
will be charged, the fun# derived go
ing to the state.
The department of Public Works
will receive bids on February 28,
1920, for the construction of 8.4 miles
of the Clearwater highway. This
road runs between Greer and Fraser,
Clearwater county, and
traverses
some of the roughest country to be
found anywhere in the state. Never
theless, careful location has kept the
; c °st down to figures which is certain
| /^"remmkaM^îow Ir mou^Mnous
| country.
pro
jects. Both roads wind up and around
the hills, keeping to a minimum radi
us of 1U0 feet for all
It is expected that a large number
of bids will be received for this
tract, as conditions are very favor
able for speedy completion ef the
work. While prices for both labor
and material-, are higher than they
were a few years ago, the nature of
the work is such that it can be handl
ed very economically arid the contract
Should he awarded at
curves.
con
reasonable
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GOMPERS OPPOSED
TO A LABOR PARTY
j HEAD OF AMERICAN FEDERA
i TION OF LABOR WRITES
LETER TO MITCHELL
WASHINGTON.—Formation of a
political labor party would be 'detri
mental to the interests of labor and
exactly in line with that which is
most ardently desired by those who
seek to oppose labor," Samuel Gom
pers declared in a letter to Wm.
Mitchell of Indianapolis, a leader of
the Indiana state labor party, made
public here today.
I Mr. Gompers wrote in reply to a
telegram from Mitchell and his as
sociates supporting the action of the
Indiana state labor party in opposing
the political declaration of the Ameri
can Federation of Labor calling on
organized workmen to elect their
friends and defeat their enemies.
Mitchell's telegram declared in
of making the fight solely through a
labor party.
"By what right," wrote Mr. Gom
pers, "do you assume to declare the
work and the policy of the American
Federation of Labor to be impract
ical? Surely the results achieved in
the interest of the workers demon
strate the utter fallacy of your as
sumption.
"By your declaration you assert
the practicability of the course you
will pursue. What experience have
you nad with your political party
upon which to base so absurd a
claim ?
"Of this one thing you may rest
assured, that the day of reckoning
is at hand for all of those who are in
antagonism to the cause of labor, and
for those who are subtle and equally
guilty even though they clothe their
actions in the robes of pretended
friendship.
"When you shall have learned the
lesson of the real struggle of labor
and the cause for which our move
ment stands, you may become penit
ent .for the gross injustice you have
done by your pretension and
course. *
"The effect of a separate political
labor party can only be disastrous
to the wage earners of our country
and to the interests of ail forward
looking people. The votes that would
go to a laoor party candidate would,
in the absence of such candidate, go
to the best man in the field,
case would they go to an enemy of
labor.
"There can be no hope for success
of labor party candidates. The ef
fect, therefore, of a political labor
party, will be to defeat our friends
and to elect our enemies.
"Labor can look upon the formation
of a political labor party only
act detrimental to the interests of
labor and exactly in line with that
which is most ardently desired by
those who seek to oppress labor.
"The welfare of American humani
ty demands in this hour of national
crisis that tnere be success at the
Tnis is no time for experi
with
your
In no
as an
polls.
political theories which
.are proven false at the outset. The
workers of America
tactics of success. They must have
results.
"Results will not be obtained by
injecting a labor party so-called
tne struggle.
"Those who are determined to be
blind to the facts of the present and
past will, of course, rush on to dis
aster and calamity. This the Ameri
can labor movement will not do. It
rejects and repudiates the fallacies of
blind theories and will have nothing
to do with those treacherous follies
that are suited only to the purposes
of labor's enemies.
"Your telegram is an affront to
the labor movement and an assault
upon the interests of that great body
ox Americans who
that the present campaign shall
suit, not in the destruction of_
liberties but in the opening of the
way to national progress and the
largement of opportunities for hu
man welfare, safety and happiness."
must use the
n
Repatriate Hun Prisoners.
PARIS.—(By A. P.)—Repatriation
f German war prisoners in Siberia
bas been authorized by the ambassa
dorial council here today. The order
Provides the repatriation is to be.
fjaade by way of the eMst.
into
are determined
re
our
en
Colfax Gets Convention.
* SEATTLE, Wash—(By A. P.) *
**■ —Colfax, Washington, „
ected by the democratic
f central committee here today as *
the place to hold the democratic ♦
* convention on May 17th. *
+++++++++f++++++*
Peary is Laid to Rest.
WASHINGTON—(By A. P.)_The
body of Rear Admirdi Peary, discov
erer of the north pole, was laid to
rest in Arlington cemetery today with
full military and naval honors, and
wit« high diplomatic and government
officials present,
were
ment.
V
...
was sei- *
state ■**
The
ceremonies
in charge of the navy depart
Chink Believed Hop Fiend.
VANCOUVER, B, C.—(By A. P.)
—J* J* Wing, Chinese, is held by the
police here today pending investiga
tion of charges that he Is the head
of a ring which has been selling drugs
m Vancouver, Seattle, Tacoma, Butte,
Spokane, Denver and other cities.

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