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Long Valley advocate. (Lardo, Idaho) 1904-1907, October 27, 1904, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055163/1904-10-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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Cbe Cong Ualley Advocate.
Published at the Beautiful Payette Lakes, the Grandest Summer Resort in Idaho
VOLUME I.
LARDO, BOISE COUNTY, IDAHO, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27
NUMBER I.
1904.
BEAUTIFUL LONG VALLEY
Destined to Become One of The Best Agricultural
Sections in Idaho—A Health and Pleasure Resort
f
A Contented and Industrious Population Filled With a Desire to Make it
a Valley of Good Homes and Surround Them With all That
Goes to Make the American Home Ideal
At a distance of about 50 miles nearly due north of Boise, entrance
is made into one of the grandest scenic valleys on the face of the earth.
It is Long Valley, the largest tract of agricultural land in Boise county
and it extends northerly for a distance of about 60 miles, with an aver
age width of about 8 miles. Majestic mountains bound it on the east
and west, their summits above the perpetual snow line, heavily clothed
along their bases and well up their -sides with magnificent forests of
yellow pine, red and white fir, tamarack, spruce, black pine, and other
trees of less value, but all tending to increase the magnificence of the view.
The valley is splendidly watered, numerous creeks of large size
flowing into the Payette river, which flows entirely through the valley
from north to south. Among the most important creeks may be men
tioned Clear creek, Big creek, Gold Fork, Lake Fork, Moore's creek, and
Brush creek. A natural luxuriant growth of wild grasses cover the
valley where the land has not been cultivated.
Whereas the early settlers depended chiefly on stock raising for a
livlihood, (cutting heavy crops of wild hay anywhere they wished in
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Among the Islands on Big Payette Lake.
the valley to winter them on), more attention is now paid to general
agricultural pursuits, owing to the rapid settlement and the excellence
of the soil and climate for all kinds of grain and vegetables. Fruit
growing is in its infancy. A few apples have been grown, some, of the
Ben Davis variety at Lardo, by Mr. L. A. Heacock, and they were fine
apples. Among tender vegetables, tomatoes, green corn, beans and
cucumbers have been grown, but not extensively, occasional summer
frosts injuring tender vegetation. These summer frosts will almost if
not entirely disappear with increased cultivation, irrigation, and the
removal of some of the heavy growth of timber.
The altitude of the valley varies from 4500 feet at the lower end to
5000 feet at Lardo, the head of the valley. The climate is delightful in
summer, it nevçr being very hot in the daytime, while the nights are
deliciously cool. Snow falls deeply in winter, a total depth of six feet
on the level has been known near Lardo. About half this amount will
probably be a fair average, but it does not drift except in a few of the
most exposed parts of the valley, an almost entire absence of strong
winds being one of the charms of the valley. As an instance of what
our winters are like, many people keep their cattle out without shelter
all winter, throwing their feed on the snow. The weather is not ex
cessively cold, men feeding their stock most of the time without coats,
but an occasional sharp snap will sometimes last two or three days.
The ground usually does not freeze, snow covering it before heavy frosts
set in, so that as soon as snow is off in the spring work may commence.
Winter is the time when most of the work in the timber is done, such
as cutting fence posts and rails, barn logs, etc.
The population of Long Valley is somewhere between 2000 and 8000,
(probably nearest the latter figure), it having doubled within the last
past three years. The chief town is Van Wyck, which has three general
merchandise stores, two saloons, telephone service, two livery stables,
two hotels, a drug store, two sawmills, blacksmith shop, church, schools,
etc. Lardo has two stores, two hotels, a newspaper, sawmill, saloon,
(Continued on 4th page.)

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