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Lincoln County times. (Jerome, Idaho) 1911-1919, July 13, 1911, Image 1

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LU
P
A Weekly
Newspaper
Devoted to the Interests of the Settlers of the North Side Xraot.
No. 19.
Vol. I.
JEROME. IDAHO, JULY 13, 1911
$2.00 Per Year
H. J. LINKE
development on
THE
rl.ANINO MILL
Store Fixtures
Store Fronts
Window Frames
Mower Sickles Ground on Short Notice
AU. K1S11S OK MILL WORK
At Ostrander l.inalier Co. Yard
H. T. PUGH
stone; mason
Slone Houses a Specially
All Work (jimrnnt(H*d Hatixfactory
Jeroini'y Malm.
Box -105.
LAND OWNERS!
Gehrmann Bros.
make a specialty of converting undt-vel
up,-,l land into Alfalfa Meadows or Ur
i liards at moderate contract prices.
Bo« 324
Jerome, Idaho.
Coppdale Contracting Co.
Plowing, Harrow ing, Iz-M-ling,
Scisling, Ditching, Building,
Alfalfa Mowed, Raked and Stacked
Anywhere in Jonathan Valley
Box 7, Coi- 1 -iim i:. Iiimio.
M. L. PARSONS
The House Builder
Jerome, Idaho
lUwidence work a apeciujty.
ing. Designing, Cabinet Work.
Contract
C. F. ANNETT
JrsTicK ok riiK Pea* k.
t »Hicc at C. F. Annctt A- Sm's
|(FSK\ M Hu I
AiUN H It AlMi 1 1
BARCLAY 4. HALL
I.AWVK.I1S
PracU*-*- in all Sum- and Federal Court«
Jkkomk, Idaho
J. S. HARTSHORN
I I* KN'I l> \flTION» » It
Idaho
Jerome
J. F. GRINDER
\ KTKKINAKI VN
Ollioe at Foster's Barn,
IDAHO
1KHO.MK
DR. E. D. PIPER
Physician and Surgeon
J lllice at Jerome Drug Store
Jkkomk, Idaho
B. It Mil«WK
It
Jrxi f. M «nu
MARTIN 4. HADDOCK
ATTORNEY* AT I AW
In.Mio
JtainMK
DR. J. F. SCHMERSHALL
Over Jcmme Drug Sion
Main Stn-ct
. - Ida ii<>
Jrmnir.
A. B. STEVENS, C. E.
I.ICKNSKI) M'BVKYOB
Irrigation ami Municipal Engineer
l«tvr Orili-n* ut Jemme Hotel.
Idaho
Jkkomk.
Dr. LEON G. PHILLIPS
DKNTIST
Hours, 5) to 12—2 to 5
(ÎOKMAN Bl.IXi.
PllONK HO
A. W. ARPS,
The Old Reliable Tin Shop
Jiut F.a*t of the North Side Livery,
Makes a Sjxx-ialty of
Metal Irrigating Tubes,
METAL PLUMING
ami all kinds of
SHEET METAL WORK
All Orders Given Prompt Allen«*' 1 '
Independent Meat Market
I R. ELLIS— 0, W. DOUGHERTY
Successors to City Most Msrkst
latent ion the same, where will be
fourni it full line of first-class Meats.
■Prices the lowest,
solicit your patronage.
We respectfully
l R. ELLIS—0. W. DOUGHERTY, Prup'rs
Plume 06
TRACT.
About Twenty Per Cent of the Land
In the Jerome District Under
Cultivation.
A careful investigation has been
going on for some time by the agri
cultural department of the North
Side Water Co., to
total
ascertain the
cultivation
midcr
anvuge
in this vicinity,
below represent the Jerome district
The figures givei
only, which embraces the territory
extending from the north line of
the segregation t<> the river, and
from the east line of the segregation
to a jsiint about « miles
Jerome.
of
west
A careful inquiry shows that
about Id,000 acres are in actual
cultivation, which represents about
20 jut cent of the entire acreage
contained in this Itnundury, The
result also shows an increase of
5000 acres over bust year. The lat
ter figure, however, dyes not cover
the amount of new land that has
lieen put under cultivation this
year, as several pieces that were
put into proveu-p crops, et*-., last
[
year an- not being worked this sea
son.
Tin- summary of the I
is made up as follows;
On-hards,
Alfalfa,
Potatoes,
Beans,
No account has lx-*-n taken of
small grains, melons, corn, cane
500 acres
1,750 acres
«,780 "
500 "
200 "
and other products, that represent
a large acreage.
The result, however, is very sat
isfactory to the Company, a« it in
dicate- a progressive and industri
ous class of farmers, who are fast
transforming a sage brush
into Iwautiful farms.
With tin- assurance of Uiunliful
disert
crops tliis sca-on, which have been
brought alxiut hy the ample supply
ami with no fear of a
of water,
«•airily of this important factor in
the future, a much larger increase
in ai-n-age will lx- shown another
season.
A% AVERAGE ration.
With several tons of alfalfa in the
«lack on his land as a result of the
more in
first cutting, and much
-ight from a second and thin! cut
ting-, the inexperienced farmer es
•ially, is just now wondering how
•h it will take to carry his stock
and how
IX«
mu*
over until another year,
sell.
much, if any, he will have to
.Mr, A. T. Kukin, the Secretary
of the Canal Users Ass n.,
the ofliee the other day, and this
question being put to him, he stated
that the average feed for
was in
cow
a
should not exceed 1200 pounds per
month, and the ration for four sheep
would alxiut equal that
This amount of hay is prescrilted
when- no grain whatever is fed. If
you an; feeding any grain at all,
these ligures would be
decreased ■ Mr- Kakin has had a
wide exjx-ricnce in st*x'k raising,
and he gives
knowingly, and they
of a cow.
materially
the above figures
he safely
can
followed. __
Orchards Begin to Ray.
Apple orchards nud other vario
coming into
Twin Falls South
lies of fruit trees are
hearing on the
Side project, although the years arc
few since the entire country was a
sage brush desert. In another year
nr two the orchards planted on the
Twin Falls North Side project,
reaching within seven miles of
Shoshone, will he marketing gener
There are already many
ous crops,
planted ami
sea
thousands
more are being put out every
«on. For twenty years the fruit
lroes planted on the Big and Little
Wo* id rivers nud in the Hager matt
valh-v have horn fruit practically
,-vcrv season and the certainty of
fruit yields here is well established.
The Carey setUers of the
Hh-.-r 2 h al ;; i i P " ( ;;, 0 g into
«-nvingTlittlc later than the North
Suh- project. And that reminds
'the prudent matt that hind will he
worth something when all these
lomlt
>f acres
orchards come into hearing
lion.—Shoshone Journal.
ORGANIZATION.
The article contributed hy Major
Heed, appearing in these columns
last week, furnishes much food for
thought among our farmers. The
keynote of his article is organization,
helciving it is the only successful
course to pursue. In this he but
voices the sentiments of the major
ity of the farmers on the tract, and
our people in general, and we trust
that his suggestions may he carried
out.
In the organization of the Canal
l 'sers Association, this idea was
paramount in the minds of the in
stigators of this Association, and
we believe that this object is still
uppermost in their minds. Up to
the present time, however, there
has tieen no occasion for active work
along this line, but, as we glean re
1 torts from all over the tract, telling
of the bountiful yeilds of all pro
ducts of the soil, the question of
marketing these products should
l«-come a serious one, and every'
farmer should work hand in hand
with his neigldmr to obtain the best
possible results.
Thus far the Association has clone
much good to each and every set
e
tler on the tract, whether he he a
member of the association or not,
and much more good can he accom
plished if every settler would enroll
himself as a member, and take an
active part in formulating plans for
carrying on the work as suggested
hy Mr. Heed. The expense con
nected with a memliership is nomi
nal, and the good to he derived
from it is hard to estimate. W
would like to see every farmer on
the tract a mein lier of this organ!
/.ation, instead of a portion of them
hanging l-ack, ready to take advai.
tage of any benefits they may derive
from it, without contributing their
proportionate share. In unity then;
is strength, and unity and harmony
an* the two prime factors toward
success on the North Side tract at
j present time,
A it authenticated article in one
MONEY IN SHEER.
of our exchanges, upon the sheep
industry in Idaho, says;
"The Idaho wool is better grown
and a stronger staple and is easily
worth two *-<-nts more a pound than
hi! of the other states this
year, and the Idaho wool is much
this year to what it was
the w<
superior
ast year.
The mutton output for Idaho
done this year will bring in $ 1,000,
I
000, all eastern money.
"The w*«*l clips for Idaho alone
this year will bring in $3,000,000,
and this money is already coming
in heavily,
having so far arrived from the east.
"This means that the sheepmen
will bring an aggregate amount of
$7,000,000 into Idaho for mutton
probably *1.500.000
and wool this year, and that ought
to help some!"
tells of
The Idaho Falls Times
the us*- of sweet clover as a soil fer
tilizer, saying that in
experiment it was found that in an
an Illinois
,f thrifty sweet clover, inelud
and roots, there
acre *
ing leaves, stems
were 228 pounds of nitrogen, which
is about twice the amount contained
acre of alfalfa or red clover,
also found that an acre of
in an
It was
this wild legume contained «.4 tons
much
of dry matter, furnishing as
would be contained in
harn
lunnas as
twenty-five loads of average
yard manure._
t hoir entire crop, at a
figure, which though quite tempt
Potato growers in this section
assurance of an ahund
evoryonc
have every
ant yield this fall, as
ports tliis crop In the host of condi
Overturos have already been
re
lion.
made to some of the growers
guaranteed
for
ing, has not been accepted hy any
, ine ^ f ar ^ w e have been nd\Be*l.
Wat(lll y OUr «eld closely, as this is
the critica i , ime in the handling of
the crop.
OUR FIRST VISIT
A Trip to ITie County Seat Much
Enjoyed by The Writer.
We had our first glimpse of the County
Seat of Lincoln county, on Monday,
having joined a party of other Jerorncitcs,
lent on hiiHiness and pleasure. Seated
liehind Frazers spirited team of blacks,
the trip through the country north and
east of lien* was both delightful and in
vigorating. Farm after farm was passer!
that plainly showed the success attained
this /ear, with their large stacks of al
falfa prominent on every hand, and the
fields of grain just turning golden, almost
ready tor the harvest.
To appreciate the possibilities that can
Is- accomplished with a generous flow of
water, one lias only to reach the high
land, lying still farther north, and view
the wide expanse of sage brush, and rea
lize how short a time ago this section
presented the same appearance.
Reaching Shoshone, we found a very
pretty little town nestled in a valley on
the banks of the Little Wood river, with
comfortable homes, and a profusion of
sha'de trees, which add so much to the
home-like appearance of so many of our
eastern friends. But it must Is- remem
bered that the birth of Shoshone dates
many years hack, and the surroundings
is only an example of what this section
can accomplish in a short time.
In company with Boh Frazer, Mayor
Gansa and "Bill" Hewitt, we stood with
eyes and mouth open as we w itnessed a
real train of varnished ears arrive ami
depart, and the sight of the diner, with
the head of the big colored cook protrud
ing from the window, was a sufficient in
spiration to hunt refreshments of some
kind.
After lunch we visited the seat of gov
ernment, the court house, and through
the courtesy of Clerk Anderson, were
shown about the premises. The interior
rooms have all Ix-en recently calsomined,
at an expense to the county only for
material, the work having been done by
prisoners. Stepping into the huge vault
we wore confronted with hooks of all
kinds and sizes, hut when the thorough
system of keeping them was explained
to us we could readily discern how easy
it was for an accountant to check tip
every transaction.
This was the day set for the convening
of the July session of the County Com
missioners, and judging from what little
we witnessed, there are much more
pleasant positions than being a County
Commissioner, as citizens from various
parts of the county were on hand to reg
ister greivanccs of some kind. This ses
sion promises to be quite a lengthy one
as there is much routine work to lie ac
complished beside the equalization of the
tax assessment of the county, just com
pleted.
The Commissioners have just recently
purchased UtO acres of laud adjoining
the town to lie used as a poor farm, and
are contemplating many improvements
on the same in order to bring it to a
self sustaining basis. I bis action has
been taken to curtail the exjiensc in
caring for the poor of the county, and
will undoubtedly result in much saving
to the tax payer later on.
We believe Lincoln county has a board
of Commissioners that are alert at all
times to the interest of the taxpayer, liv
ing representative men of their respective
communities, w ith the only desire and
aim to do the greatest good to the great
est number.
The business men of our sister town
report a generous trade hud indications
point to a very satisfactory condition of
things generally. However, as evening
approached, we were glad to start home
ward, and as our eye caught a glimpse
of Jerome we were more firmly convinced
than ever that our own was the most
promising town in Lincoln county.
School Board Meets.
The school board met in regular ses
sion last Saturday evening, all members
being present. After the reading and
approval of the previous meeting, the
board considered the applications for
janitor for the coming school year. On
motion of Mr. Wagner, seconded hy Mr.
Jno. D. Niius the application of Frank
G. Nims was accepted as the lowest and
best bid, and Mr. Xims was declared
elected at a salary of $70.00 i«-r month.
Upon recomcndations by Wayland and
Fennell, the architects, the hoard thought
it best to not put the «qiahln g touches
the interior walls of the new school
building until the building had thorough
ly settled. A committee from the terri
tory 5 miles west of town, being present,
the Ixiard took up the matter of build
a school lions*- in that vicinity, the result
of which was the appointment of a com
mittee to confer with owners of land in
that neighborhood, and to secure, if
on
possible one acre of ground at a point ">
miles west of Jerome. The latard hope
to have a school house at this point by the
Iteginnlng of the coming school year.
Other matters wer*- discussed, after which
the board adjourned,

For Sale.
A second hand conk stove. Apply at
this ofliee.
R. S. FRAZER. PRES
W L. HUYETTE. CASHIER.
P. R. KARTZKE, VICE PRES.
C F. MASSEY ASST. CASHIER
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S U C C E S S.
Established January 2, 1909.
Notice! —Safety Deposit Boxes to rent at a very nominal charge.
FENCE WIRE
We have just received two car loads of the popular
EL WOOD, AMERICAN ROYAL
Rabbit-Proof and Hog-Tight Fencing
ORDERS PROMPTLY
I All Sizes of Galvanized Steel Irrigating Tube» |
Frazer-Moore Comp'y
Heavy &. Shelf Hardware, Stoves, Ranges, Etc.
JEROME!, IDAHO
ICE!
ICE !
E ARE MAKING DAILY
W
Deliveries of Ice. Patrons whose
names are not on our Daily Call List
and wish ice, call Phone 71 or
notify
our driver and we
promptly.
will fill your orders
Jerome Livery Co.
Phone 71
ICE!
ICE !
1
Imported Hackney Stallion
Fortrey Active
IMP. FORTREY ACTIVE is a chestnut; blaze and
white. Sired by Halloo Carton Dane; dam, Fortrey Rose, Bred by
William Gifford Butcher, Holywell, St. Ives, Eng. Registered in Ameri
can Hackney Stud Book.
no other
Fortrey Active
Will make the season of 191 I
North Side Livery Barn, Jerome
Thursday, Friday and Saturday of each
week. Balance of time at the
DeVoe Orchards & Stock Farms Co
Five Miles North of Jerome.
as follows:
This Horse has been inspected by the State San
itary Board and found sound in every particular.
TERMS OF SERVICE
$12.00. $2.00 at lime of service, $10 due Sept.
For the season.
1st, 1911. To insure mare in foal, $ I 5.00. $2.00 at time of service
and $13 due March 1, 1912.
If mare U sold or removed from county, money becomes due »I once.
will not be
Due precaution will be used to prevent accidents, hut we
responsible should any occur.
The De Voe Orchards d- Stock Farms Co.,
Owners
W, A. AMBROSE. Attendant.
J

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