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Lincoln County times. (Jerome, Idaho) 1911-1919, October 31, 1918, Image 1

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8 PAGKH
8 PAOE8
th* North Sid* Trtot.
A
Week I y
Newspaper Devoted to the Interests of the Settlers of
VOli. 8. NO. 87.
«2.00 PER YEAR
JEROME, IDAHO, OCTOBER 81, 1018.
BOYD K. FRAZER PAHSIX
AWAY AFTER BRIEF ILLNEHH
— «8 —
Well Known Young Man Huccuniba
to Pneuiunula.
Wednesday morning the
community was grieved when it
learned that Boyd Frazer, son of R.
S. Frazer, hud passed to the Great
Beyond after a brief illness.
Boyd Frazer was reared in Je
rome and reached his nineteenth
birthday the 16th day of last Sep
tember. On October 16th, the
young man was inducted into the
Student's Army Training Corps and
left that day for training. He hud
been at the school but three days
when he was taken ill und was con
fined to a hospital tor ten days. He
men came home and arrived here
Sunday. From Sunday until the end
the young man declined and, al
though the fondest care and aid that
could be given, he passed to his re
ward at 3 o'clock Wednesday morn
ing.
whole
was
Boyd was a young man who took
part in all athletics at school, was a
general favorite with the younger
set and all who knew him, and his
friendly smile and happy greeting
will be sorely missed by his com
rades and friends.
[sympathy of the entire community
[goes out to VUncle Bob" Frazer, and
Starret, father and brother of the
The deepest
Jyoung man. Starrel is serving with
the Murines overseas,
[ The funeral was held from the
[home this afternoon and Interment
[look place at Jerome cemetery, where
[the remains wore tenderly laid to
[rest beside his mother, who passed
Ho the better world some time ago.
WOMEN NEEDED IN BUILDING
AIRSHIPS.
Philadelphia Aviation Plwnt Needs
Semiskilled Workers si Once.
J. H. Wlllets. of the Employment
Naval
Aircraft
of
Department
League Island, Philadelphia, has Is
lued a call for women workers in the
kvlation plliit. This is among the
lew industries opening for women.
Ippllcants need not be skilled mo
ll an lea or
iroduetton. Those who have worked
lx months I*, woodworking opera
]oi]s or for a slmlla- time as inspect
jrs'of metal working machines could
li used at once.
experienced In aircraft
Y OMAN WORKER HAS SIX SONS
IN WAR
Tlielr
Have Already Given
Live* for Their Country «>•» the
Field» of France.
four
One of tho most tragic records of
Is that of a women employee
f the Rock Island Arsenal, four of
[hose tdx cons already have given
Mr live» in the war.
ie war
She Is Mrs
ira Carton, of 636 Twenty-sixth
Iroet. Rock Inland, an operative in
le cloth department.
Of the four sons who were killed,
Ireo were members of tho United
lutes Engineers and one of a Cann
jnn bataillon. The two remaining
[us are now In Frrnce,
I Mrs Carton has worked at the
Iscmil with the same spirit of pat-
title devotion that her sons showed
I their service in tho army.
- M M
■MPI.E PRECAUTIONS
I TO PREVENT INFLUENZA
I I In view of the widespread prev
jtnee of Influenza at the present
be. all Red Cross workers are ad
Mcil to take all possible precati
Rnary measures to prevent con
bctlng this disease.
12, Keep in mind that like most in
fclliuis diseases influenza is spread
Bcontact infection, that is, by tho
Kual (ranafer of the active poison
Bun one person to another. It 1»
Bead to a largo degree by sneez
B and coughing, at which times the
■ecteed discharges from the nose
Hd throat are scattered In the air.
Bose Infected should stay at home.
■3 Avoid crowds.
Hi Kegulate bodily functions and
Bep them so.
■6. Wash your hands frequently.
B$. Wash out the nose and throat
Bo or three limes dally by a nasal
^«ay or douche and by a gargle
Blh a normal salt solution ( %
^lapoon salt to one glass, eight
^Bcet, clean water).
H7. When sneezing, or coughing.
Bf 1 « your handkerchief before your
and mouth.
If you have a cold, use utensMs
your personal use exclusively,
^Buu are in contact with one so af
^Bted. he careful not to handle uten
used by him.
Above all avoid fearing
^Beading fear of the disease.
H c. W. SHARPLES,
HÜ Division Medical Adviser.
GETTING THE RANGE OF A GERMAN GOTHA
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li Is an exceedingly technical task to determine trie altitude and speed of a last-moving enemy plane,
members of a British antiaircraft section are getting lb - range of a German Gotha : in turn they will communi
cate it to quick lire guns along the Hue.
Here
AN EFFICIENT TICKET.
It behooves every loyal Democrat
to vote the Democratic ticket
November 5th, and by doing so he
stands squarely behind the Presi
dent in all war policies advocated
by our chief executive. Last week
the News said that all persons who
are opposed to Socialism or Bolshev
ikism should vote the
ticket.
truly cays that the county ticket is
controlled by the Democratic party,
and that being the case what reason
lias the News to say 100 per cent loy
al Americans should vote the Repub
lican ticket? There is no difference
In the brand of Democracy or in the
stand which the candidates on the
Democratic ticket have taken in for
mer elections, but the News seems to I
be trying to make.an Issue out of
on
republican
On the other band the News
tills. If so, let the News tome out
and say what Democratic candidates
are not 100 per cent loyal, and If It
can single out any person upon the
Democratic ticket who cannot stand
the loyalty test, then we are willing
to concede that he should not be i
voted for or elected to office. Until
his Is done, we are appealing to all
Democratic voters to stand squarely
behind the Democratic ticket and not
be influenced or biased by what a
few Republican party leaders may
say, inspired more by their wishes
for the success of the Republican
parly. As the Democrats need no
100 per cent loyalty clubs, every
Democrat being a patriotic citizen
and desiring to do their duty at this
lime, the Democratic ticket Is a safe
ticket to vote.
DISABLKD SOLDIERS IN
INDUSTRY
The Federal Board for Vocational
Education, assisted
States Employment Service, proposes
to make a real job out of the task
of placing disabled soldiers and sail
ors in industrial employment.
For a lung time England permitted
volunteer associations to find jobs
for the discharged solUh-rs. and the
plan proved an absolute failure Too
many employers offered to take the
boys in and give them jobs on the
assumption that It was their patri
otic duty to help the disabled. It
d'du't work! Then England made a
government affair of employment and
found places for their disabled sol
diers and sailor?, where the employer
could cheerfully write "for value re
ceived" across the man's pay envo
by the United
tope.
The American Government is fol
lowlng the latter course; and it is
training soldiers for Industrial em
ployment, spending six months or
morn i n each man.
pared for employment a plscc
found, and he is sent out to earn his
living In a way that make- him abso
lutely Independent; and tho proposi
tion balances dollar for dollar bc
Tbo
When he is pre
is
employer and employee.
•ween
motto fo Uncle Sam la this task Is
The operation of
"no sentiment."
the whole plan Is made absolutely
disabled man
practical: since the
when turned into industry has been
evolved from the soldier into a real
economic fao'or in the industrial life
of his country.
-M Mi
WEIGHING * MEASURING TEST.
■Vlsconsin hits
found the weighing ntd measuring
test so beneficial that there is
movement on foot to npplj it to the
older children even up to 18aqd 20.
in
One county
K)
UNITED WAR WORK CAMPAIGN.
« 170 , 000 , 000 . 00 .
The United War Work drive to occur the week of November IM
M 11th to 16th. Get ready.
This BIG DRIVE will represent seven different War Organlza- IM.
8*i tious. SEVEN big drives in one. The organizations represented are: IM
Young Men's Christian Association.
Knights of Columbus.
Young Women's Christian Association.
War Camp Community Service.
Salvation Army.
Jewish Welfare'Board.
American Library Association.
The work of some of these organizations we are not entirely
B» familiar with, but the committee wish to assure you that they are Ml
Ml all worthy and you caff pick the work of the one you are most.lM
fcs familiar with and then without mistake measure any one of the IM
Mi other organizations with it. Each organization begins Its work Ml
te when your boy reaches training camp and continues on with him IM
into Europe and on his return home again. And we are reliably IM
M informed that there is no duplication in their wont. We will M
•a readily understand that in this game of war there Is plenty of M
te, relief work for all.
Be ready, and when the date is set for the Drive fop Jerome M
R, and vicinity, let us put it over with a rush as we always have M
M done heretofore.
MiMiMIMIMMiMiMHaMs Pa M.
M
M
M
»■
AMERICA ANSWERS GERMANY.
— Ml —
Farmers offering $6 a i
day and board for men on threshing I
crews. Labor hard to get at any
price and scarcé ;s hen's teeth.
The following statement was made
at the While House by J, P. Tu
multy. secretary to the President:
"The goiMinmenl will continue to
8en(1
over 250,000 men with their
8UppI|e8 every month , and there will
be no relaxation."
- -M M —
IDAHO INDUSTRIAL REVIEW.
— Ml —
Oct. 28—Food administration urg
es all farmers to do as much plow
ing and seeding as practical this fall
because it is likely that there will
be a greater shortage of labor next
spring than now'.
Pend Orielle county
vlll double
road expenditures.
Richfield—!
timbered and cleaned out prepara
t orv to extending It shout 900 feet
four per
Food prices increased
cent in September due to increasing
labor scarcity in all lines of food pro
d notion.
Richfield promised a grain ele
vator In time for next season's crop,
Salmoon river highway being rush
ed with steam shovels.
Salmon—800,000 brick burned
for Drilling Development Co.
Coeur d'Alene—Hidden Treasure
tunnel. 500 feel lower, reopened, re
old
to cut the Union ore bodies.
Salmon—Plan to electrify
Ranger mine.
Hailey Wafer Co. sold to Mrs. E.
M. Ashton.
Hailey—Hotel Hiawatha to be en
larged af a cost of $30,000.
Idaho Falls—26,000 trout perch
to be placed in neighboring streams
Wool production and sheep bus
bandry have become a national issue
and the need of more clothing and
meat supplies is an imperative war
necessity.
Boise
country planning
Farmers in Black's creek
more fall grain
than ever before.
Meridian New elevator of Cald
ell Milling & Elevator Co, nearing
Idaho wheat ostiiarted at 16.67 0.
completion.
000 bushels.
Meridian -Idaho Products Co re
reives big order for potato chips.
Boise—Cut In apple raies saves
growers million dollars.
Idaho Falls Great "glory" strike
opened at Ruby Silver mine.
-«a Mi
or five feet of reaching the ground.
Il Is not true that the kaiser has
When
reached the end of his rope,
he does that his feet will lack four
YANKEES LIKE BEANS.
Consumption of beans by the
United States army averages 62%
tons a day. Dried beans are a popu
lar dish among Uncle Sam's soldier»
and they receive the best that can
be furnished. Beans have a high
value as food and are especially suit
able for men under intensive train
ing, experts of the war department
have found.
All the beans required by the
United States and the allies for the
coming year will be obtained through
one purchaser, the food administra
tion grain corporation. whi-h has
made arrangements to Inspect and
pay cash for beans in the produclrg
fields. This will eliminate delav In
Payments and insure the purchasi of
heans at a lower figure,
lOO PER CENT PATRIOTISM.
field artillery erecting department of
the Rock Island arsenal, Rock 1s
Two hundred men employed in the
land. 111., have volunteered not only
to forego thoir customary Thanks
giving holiday in order that they
might donate a full day's production
to the army, but have also proposed
to give their wages for that day to
the American Red Cross. As they
will be paid at the rate of "doul le
lime," their contribution tc the lied
Cross \\>ll tc a considerable sai.t.
Brig. Gen. John T. Thompson, di
rector of arsenals, on learning of
the men's action, sent them a letter
,of appreciation
VOLUNTEERS CALLED FOR.
The local Red Cross Chapter again
issues an urgent call for volunteer
nurses to aid in the present Influenza
epidemic. Mrs. Piper is receiving
call after call from people who need
to come In and help them
, someone
(for two or three days during the sud
member of the
j Hen Illness of some
family, and as these calls are likely
I to continue and become more numer
ous she is very anxious to get In
touch with those who can serve In
All who feel that they
1 this way.
can help the work or the Red Cross
to this extent are most earnestly re
■1th Mrs, Piper.
. quested to register
Our ultimate objective is the Ho
henzollern line.
The limit of sorrow and distress
the kaiser has inflicted upon his own
people will not be reached until he
abdtctatees in favor of the crown
I to the w all that Isn t there.
prince.
j The Germans now have thler backs
FAVOR ARMY BEEF CHANGES.
The recent announcement or the
Government policy of buying boet
for the fighting forces of Uncle Sam
nd the allies on a quality baels has
met the approval of cattle feeders.
With quality. Irrespective of weight,
as a basis feeders can make a quick
turnover on their money Invested in
cattle. They can market well-finish
ed and conditioned beeves which
weigh less than 1000 pounds for
Army or Navy disposition.' It is be
lieved the regulation will stabilize
production and better balance the
livestock Industry. The abandon
ment of the old schedule which call
ed for beef of apeclflc weights drops
the bars so that hereafter lightweight
baby beef will be available for feed
ing our soldiers and sailors. The
new rulling favors tho increasq in
the production cf baby beeves, a
branch of meat making which affords
an attractive opportunity for de
pendable and quick profit to the
producers.
DIGGING COAL FOR PERSHING.
One day last winter, when the coal
famine was at its worst, a Senator
from Ohio recited the blunders by
reason of which the great coal pro
ducing state was deprived of even
enough fuel to keep Us University
open and its people from freezing. A
visitor in the gallery remarked : "I
wish that senator would stop talking;
he Is breaking ray heart." Out in
Ohio this year they are no longer
breaking hearts; but they are pro
ducing coal. Production Manager
J. J. Roby, of Cleveland, calls atten
tion In a statement to the fact that
General Pershing demands 900,QUO
tons more a month than Washington
figured on. "All right," says Roby,
"we'll come thnmgb with our part,
and we are now going 46,000 tons a
week over our share, and we will
make it 66,000 tons." That's the
kind of a response that Is coming
from every portion of the country,
and the fuel administration is confi
dent that it will have enough coal
for Pershing and all the rest of our
fighting military and industrial forc
es this winter.
WOMEN AND GREASY JOBS.
There is on file in the Employ-
ment Service of the Government a
Hat of more than 260 distinct occu-
pations women are filling in Indus-
try. They are learning to read blue
prints as well as dress patterns, and
to handle hammers without losing
the Iron nails or those on their fing-
ers. The munition factories are full
of such women and they have demon-
strated in this last year or two that
there Is nothing unwomanly about
the woman In overalls working at so-
called dirty, greasy jobs.
- M M
TEAM KILLED AT APPLETON.
The west bound passenger train
Wednesday killed a term at the Ap
pleton switch, belonging to a man
named Erving. Mr. Erving was un
loading hay into a ear standing on
the siding, and his wagon and team
between that and the other
A curve near the switch ob
was
track.
soured the view and he did not hear
the approach of the train until it
was close upon his. One horse was
killed instantly tynd the other so
badly Injured it had to be shot. The
wagon was also badly smashed.
HOSPITAL .ASSISTANTS.
Do not forget the position of hos
pital assistants offered by tho army
school of nursing,
married women between the ages of
21 and 40 whose husbands are over
seas. also single women between the
of 36 and 4 6—graduates of
Eligibles must be
ages
high schools or Us acceptable equlv
They will be assigned to con
hoepltals in this country
aient.
valescent
where training school units are not
For further Informa
established,
tlon Inquire of Surgeon General's
Office. Washington. D. C.
THANKSGIVING MUSIC
A plan is on foot whereby every
wlll be naked to sing the nme
at the some hour on Thanks
throughout the
one
songs
giving
country.
morning
Plans will be out later.
WAR HISTORY
The state council has under con
sideration plans for securing a defi
nite history of each soldier and sail
or who has gone from Idaho,
county who now ha* this data com
plete would
porting the
The woman's committee should feel
the responsibility la assisting In this
work.
Any
confer a favor by re
same to headquarters.
GOVERNMENT TO PAY «12
A TON FOR SUGAR BEETS.
courage more farmers to increase
the number of acres planted to beets,
Sugar is something that everyone
must have, especially the soldier in
the field because'the boy sraust nec
essarily have it on account of the
healing properties of the sugar. It
therefore behooves every farmer to
raise all the beets that is possible,
not only for the profit that is in
them, but because of the patriotic
duty that Is^ierformed.
""
Price This Year Induced Fanners to
Increase Beet Acreage.
It has been learned that the gov
ernment is to pay $12 per ton for
sugar beets next year. The price
of $10, which was paid for beets
this year induced farmers over the
tract to increase the acreage plant
ed to beets and the new price named
by the government will doubtless en
REDUCTION IN FREIGHT
RATES TO BE ASKED. ,
Believed That at Least «20 a Ton
Will Be Realized.
At the hay growers' meeting,
which was held 'at Shoshone, Octo
ber 2 6tb, it was decided to ask for &
reduction of freight rates on hay.
A committee was appointed to attend
to this matter and also to get In
touch with the farmers and dairy
men of northern Idaho and eastern
Washington, where the hay situa
tion is acute. County Agent Avery
will go to the above mentioned sec
tions to personally Investigate the
hay problems. It is believed that at
least $20 a ton, f. o. b., will be rea
lized.
All having hay for sale are re
quested to report the number of
tons, section, range, etc., where It la
located to Albert Hawklnson, Jerome.
DID YOU KNOW 7 —
That two and a half million letters
are written home by the boys every
day on Red Triangle stationery?
That there is a "Y" secretary on
the train that carries the boys to
the cantonments; and another on the
trains that go on the embarkation
ports; and one or two on every
transport ?
That the "Y" ships to France 16
miles of motion picture films every
week ?
That the Testaments provided for
our boys would make a pile 17 %
miles high?
That 100 of the best actors and
actresses. Including such stars as
Elsie Janis and E. H. Sothern, travel
the "Y" circuit In France, giving per
formances In the Huts?
That the "Y" has built 538 Huts
in this country and over 2,000 over
seas. including huts in England and
France, and for our allies—-the
French and Italian armies?
That the "Y" is sending men and
women to France at the rate of
1,000 a month to be big brothers and
sisters to our boys?
STUDENT NURSES.
—M—
Idaho now has 184 registrants for
student nurses with their papers all
sent in to Washington. D. C. Some
have received their appointments;
others are anxiously waiting,
request comes that the campaign for
more bo continued,
men are requested to send for the
blanks they actually need as Mrs.
J. M. Taylor, who has this work in
charge, now has a limited supply.
'-Mi « -
If you eat peaches, prunes, etc.,
don't forget to pit your mite against
the kaiser.
The
County chair
Democratic County Candidate«
State Senator
Henry M. Hall
State Representative
Sam W. Hills
Commissioner—First District
T. I. Roberson
Commissioner—Second District
R. J. McMahon
t'ouï mlssloner—Third District
W. T. Patterson
County Clerk
A. D. Williamson
Sheriff
Dewitt Quereau
County Treasurer
Stella Cook
Probate Judge
Fred L. Tlllotson
Superintendent
Assessor
Bert Bowler
Coroner
D. A. L'Herlsson
Surveyor
Lynn Crandall
Prosecuting Attorney
Harlan D. Heist

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