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Lincoln County times. (Jerome, Idaho) 1911-1919, November 14, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055184/1918-11-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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Willi
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8 PAOR»
» PAGK8
A Weekly Newspaper Devoted to the Interests of the Settlers of the North Side Trsot.
VOL. 8 . NO. 80
«9.00 PER TEAR
JEROME, IDAHO. NOVEMBER 14, 1018
FARMERS SHOULD PREPARE
FX>R AFTER. WAR CONDITIONS
To North Side Farmers:
We all rejoice that the war Is sub
stantially over.
It will be some time,
however, before a peace program will
be agreed upon, and undoubtedly a
large American force will be requir
ed In Europe tor at least
another
year, on police duty, and to assist
generally.
It now behooves
farmer,
particularly those of us who are a
long distance from terminal markets,
to consider after-war conditions
every
as
affecting the farmer,
there are two crops on which the
price for 1919 has been fixed, wheat
and sugar beets, both of which
being grown very successfully on the
North Side.
I understand
are
The area, however, thaf can be de
voted to sugar beets will depend very
much on the distance from the ship
ping point. Until we can have bet
ter roads, so that beets can be moved
by truck, only those living within the
three miles of beet loading stations
should undertake tne crop, although
the price for next year will admit of
a longer haul.
You are aware that the price fixed
for the 1919 crop Is $12 per ton.
This Is the highest price ever paid
for sugar beets since the history of
the Industry, and those of you who
have suitable land as well as loca
tion should most carefully study thhg.
proposition. 2
The average yield on the Jeromfl
territory Is 12 tons of commerefjH
beets. Where the ground is wejf
prepared and has been In alfalfa for
a period of time previously, yields of
16 to 18 tons may be expected; but
simply assuming the average yield,
you will find It gives a return of
$144 per acre.
The Department of Agriculture has
been giving a great deal of attention
to the value of the beet by-products
on the farm. It Is claimed by the
Department of Agriculture that there
will be an average of half a ton of
beet tops and crowns for each ton of
commercial bMU so that an average
yield of 12 tons of commercial beets
will yield six tons of tops. The De
partment also claims that If those
tops are properly siloed, they have
a food value equal to that of alfalfa.
ton for ton. so that the by-products,
when placed In the silo, according to
the Department of Agriculture, 1s
equal to a 6 -ton hay crop. As this
Is greater than the average yield of
alfalfa, and as alfalfa la ordinarily a
good paying crop, you should care
fully consider the by-products as an
Inducement for going Into the sugar
beet business.
The silo for beet tops is really
nothing more Inan a pit. The tops
handled In pits not unlike the
pitting of potatoes. In order to as
certain the accuracy of the govern
ment's estimates In this matter, we
sre putting In siloes something like
a thousand tons of beet tops on th«'
Settlers' Ranch northeast of Jerome,
You are most earnestly Invited to go
out there and see how we are doing
It. This work Is being done under
government supervision. We are eu
deuvorlng to do everything Just as
the Department of Agriculture rec
ommends, and 1 have had their expert
here to Inspect our work and see
that we were on the right track. We
have also arranged with stockmen to
bring in sheep and cattle for the
ipurpose of feeding out this ensilage,
which will also be done under gov
[eminent supervision; also the State
[Agricultural Colleg* will have a man
Bo keep a record of the results.
I I have not gone Into this solely on
file statements of the Department of
Ikgriculture, but have met livestock
Een who fed beet top ensilage, feed
Ing half and half with alfalfa—that
Ip. about half a ton of ensilage and
■alf a ton of alfalfa—makes a splen
lid food ration, and that their re
Brits were very satisfactory. Unfor
Bmatoly, however, none of these
Ben kept a cost account, so that we
B> not know the exact figures, but It
Hoked good enough tor us to try
^■t on n large scale, and we are keep
■g accurate figures and will say
^Vri the construction of the siloes
^■d getting the lops In Is costing us
■ average of about $2 a ton.
■>t must be evident to every hay
^Bwor on this tract that he would
better off if there were enough
I^Bstoek owned by the farmers on
project to consume much more
^Bbe hay. We are now making ev
effort to find outside markets,
undoubtedly will bo able to
the better quality of the hay
H^V'ig the winter at aatlsfactory
i^Hes. hut as you know, there Is a
il^Btrtftruble amount of hay that was
nr less damaged, and which
II^Hld hardly pay to go to the ex
of baling and shipping, the ex
of which Is just the same on
hay m U U on good hay. My
are
own experience, however, has been
that so-called damaged hay makes
really about as good feed as the
bright colored pea green article. We
know, however, that appearance
has a great deal to do with value.
You know yourself how that goes
when you come to buy an article at
the store or the machinery company;
it Is well-painted, bright, that Is
what you buy. We are Just grown
children, that Is all, and color ap
peals to us.
So It Is with the hay. If the east
ern farmer could only sell his hay
that never got wet, he would never
have any to sell; It 1 s a miracle to
get through the season back In Iowa
and not have hay get more or less
rain on It. However, the fact re
mains that the bright colored hay is
what sells the best, and It would be
good thing If we only had stock
enough on the farm to clean up the
colored hay.
1 want to congratulate the faith
ful dairyman who has hung on to his
herds and Is today receiving the
highest price ever paid for butter
fat. He has got the best market of
any for his hay. It Is not everyone
who should go Into the dairy busi
ness; you have got to like and en
joy the work you are engaged In If
you are ging to make a success of
It, I don't care what the work may
be. So If you don't like to milk cows
pven with butter fat where it Is,
Bon't go Into It. But 1 want to say
^KfltMMptat the time has come when
many of the farmers ought
pEuy and make love to a good milch
8 ». She will surely pay you well.
It Is my opinion that good dairy
stock and dairy products will de
crease In value from present prices
more slowly than any other farm pro
duct. There la a reason for this.
The European countries that have
been devastated by the war are prac
tically without dairy animals; they
have practically all been killed and
used up. Our department of agricul
ture Is already Informed that it Is
expected the United Slates must fur
nish the stock to take the place of
those gone. My understanding Is that
It Is going to require about a mil
lion head of dairy animals from the
United States to supply European ne
cessities.
(
We will commence to feel this de
mand very strong next spring. The
foreign shipments of dairy stock are
at the present high price, to be sure,
but at a good profitable price,
Just now the dairyman In the Spo
the scarcity of feed Our county ng
, an be bought at around $60 per
head; this Is a very low price for
that class of stock. 1 want to bring
this to your attention, 1 believe it
| s your opportunity to get a start.
Mr. Avery will be back In abou a
week. You should make It a point
to Inform yourself on this question.
You remember that with the close
,,f the war will come a constant de
mand for lower cost of living. Every
thing that you have to buy you
expect to buy for less money than
V ou paid during the war.
going to be true of everybody,
over the country, and the tendency,
n f course, will be downward on all
necessary products, I do not know
that this will be Immediately felt.
but It Is bound to come, and that man
| S wise who Is able to convert the pro
ducts of his farm over Into commod
(ties which will be affected the least
hy this change In prices. If the Spo
kane and Pngef Sound farmer can
make money feeding $20 hay. you
mais.
this.
election Is over
f n8 t spending Its force.
time to give our earnest thought
bettering our farming here on the
North Side We have got to i
t 0 maintain the value oÇ our propor
ties. A good many of you have gone
into land at whnt would formerly
have been regarded ns high prices
Your only way of paying out Is go
ing to be by producing crops worth
bound to maintain a good price for
dairy products, which In my opinion
will continue for several years—not
Sound territories
kane and Puget
an* having to «HI off large number«
of their dairy herds on account of
ent Is Investigating this matter now
and advises me that good Holstein
heifers, eligible to register, and bred,
W U1
This Is
feeding
certainly can make money
$15 hay. The time you spend bal
ing and hauling could be better spent
In feeding and taking care of ani
Remember the by-products of the
the farm has
Manure on
cow.
commercial vaine of $2 a ton:
field well manured will
that
Is to say, a
yield a greater return, because of
There Is a pretty good day's
for someone, hayllng and scat
terlng manure Figure how many
tons vou ran handle In a day and see
NÔw y0 tha?"he fighting Is over, the
and the Influenza
wages
shall have
we
do
(Continued on last page.)
UNITED WAR WORK CAMPAIGN.
Last Saturday was a Red Letter Day for Jerome District in
the War Work Campaign.
About 450 people came across splendidly and about $2,000
of our $3,500 allotment was raised on that day.
BUT—
The boys need the other $1,500 and to do it, every person
must do the part alloted to them to carry on the work of keep
ing some of "the comforts of the home and of the ideals of
America ' ' with them until they finish up the job we sent them
to do and come home again.
LET US NOT DELAY.
Send in the check or leave the money with Mr. Ridgway
over the First National Bank, v
DO IT NOW.
WAR FINANCE COMMITTEE.
BOYD FRAZER WAS
REGULARLY DISCHARGED
Parent and FYiend of Boyd K. Eraser
Investigate Conditions at the
Moscow, Idain», School.
Owing to the circumstances con
nected with the Illness and death of
the late Boyd Frazer to those near
and dear to him, it appeared that the
young man had not received duo care
at the Moscow School and that he
had been turned out while In
raeuts there would have put him In
< h ® hospital for treatment. In not
reporting his illness, it can readllj
I)e Been that the young man was
homesick and. not feeling well, was
; determined to return to Mb parent,
T °o much credit can not be gnen
Dr. Llndley and ( apt. kelkner for
l,ie manner In which they have an
,lled the problems put to them In
alljcutrod. groat enre must have been
taken, an " *' E Ulc " ' rt
porting where facilities a een
made for on y a ou e wor
wa * doubly hard.
« hurt has an pr vale
>he si so i 1 er io\s an
<■ mlr
e*I> 1 8
1 'lmes today.
any paper In the county
pay jour subsir pt on
until Jan. 1st, 1980.
sick condition.
friends, the father, U. S. Frazer, ac
companied by A. C. Alexander, made
a trip to Moscow last week to Inves
tigate the conditions there.
On their arrival at Moscow they
were met by Dr. Lladley, president of
the University, ifftd Capt. Felkner,
commandant, who explained all the
steps required of the young men en
tering the school and who Insisted
that a trip of Investigation be made
of the entire school which was done,
and conditions found exactly as these
gentlemen had explained.
In the matter of Boyd Frazer it was
shown that the young man was dis
charged from the service on Octobea
24th. for some minor physical dial
ability, but as the necessary blanks
were not at hand he could not be re
leased at that time but had to re
.....
main over until the morning of tho
- 6 lh. and after receiving his ills
charge on that date was too late to
make his train tor Jerome, necessi
On tho advise of
taring his staying over until the
morning of the 26th. On tha morn
; 111 * of the 26th ' the young man re
; ported to the commandant for final
(discharge, but said nothing as to his
I feeling 111 , and as his Illness was
' not detected he was released,* Had
! ,1,e
"ould have been impossible for him
'to have left the school as the require
reported ill. It
young
man
And
J the recent epidemic there.
when one stops to think that out of
800 students only lour deaths oc
The good people of Moscow were
quick to go to the assistance of the
school officials, opening their homes
hospitals to
Ishlng blankets as the allotment
from tho government did not arrive
<n time.
Every courtesy was shown to the
Jerome visitors by tho officers, fac
ulty and civilians of Moscow, who.
the errand, were
j on learning of
more than anxious to ass-st in the in
I vesttgatlon.
HOLD YOUR LIBERTY BONDS.
—iu—
'be United Stales
American soldiers return home th. j
tire going to feel very kindly toward
the subscribers to tho Liberty Loans.
Liberty Bonds are Incontrovertible
evidence that the purchaser has sup
ported his government, has support
soldiers abroad In this war.
There Is a notion very prevalent In
when the
that
■ridenoe In your posses
slow until the boys come home.
Subscribe for The Lincoln Countv
Largest circulation of
$2.00 will
from
now
Auto Robes at J&s Summers.
VICTORY AND PEACE.
On last Monday morning the glad
tidings were flashed over our coun
try that the armistice bad been sign
ed that morning and thus victory and
peace are ours.
After four years of struggling, tha
rights of mankind are served. The
greatest day in the history of na
tions has dawned. The German mili
tary classes—arrogant beyond ex
__
Senator—
^ . 4th '. ^
Frank L Moore, Dem .........
Ü. S. Senator-—
Term ending March 4th, 1921.
Frank R Gooding .
John F Nugent, Deni.
Representative In Congress—
Official Vote of Lincoln County by Precincts
The vote of Lincoln County by precincts as canvassed by the Board
last Monday shows the following results:
Very little difference appears in the official vote from that given to the readers of the Times in last
2be official count shows the same officers elected as reported last week, there being a slight
difference In some majorities in the vote as canvassed by the Board.
of County Commissioners on
week's issue.
5
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to
CANDIDATES
2
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to
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9
4
oo
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8
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o.
3
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rt
O
;
*
• «
57; 167
45: 13»
68
331 233
148 43
160
163
22
44
37
1262
622
9
60
0
143
49
14
640
301 130
77) 177
31
294 116
97
10
134
8
19
868
v
201
46
164
116
184
11
88
32
1096
227
48 101
64 200
C R Jeppeson. Dem . . .
Addison T Smith..
Justice of Supreme Court—
Alfred Budge.
Governor—
D W Daria.
H F Samuels. Dorn.
Lieutenant Governor—
39 114 113 89
28 363) 163 117
I I
49 341| 199 1411
'll'
361 363! 1341 111
39| 123 ; 1411 1031
3o! 3S7i 1361 109
39 ! 122 126 99
I I
441 1391 1331 104
22Î 3091 133 103
1 I 1
22 316 ! 1231 98
43! 133! 1381 109
I I i
48: 321: 183! 143
20 143! g;) 6 2 f
118
4
70
20
716
17
198
27
32
1189
473
169 179
18
207
62
41
1396
47|
171
13
163
17
23 1077
208
71 127
9
160
80
28
871
47 176 1691
67j 121 1631
63 1 122 I 60 I
38 168 158 J
43 1 169; 170
66 J 120| 142
j
67 164 176
46 132 134
39 1 173 1 163
62! 120 146
86 . 264 267
IB
C C Moore .
Oscar G Zuck, Dom .
Secretary of State—
W A Fife, Dem .
Robert O Jones .
State Auditor—
Edward G Gallot .
W P Rice, Dem .
Slate Treasurer—
John W Bagleson .
Ernest L Parker, Dem
Attorney General—
Roy L Black .
B A Cummings. Dem....
Superintendent of Schools—
Ethel Redfield, Republican
inspector of Mines—
Robert N Bell .
William J J Smith, Dem..
State Senator—
Henrv M Hall. Dom .
W A Heiss .
24
1048
220
7
7*1
78
828
6
74
29
864
II
IS
23
986
121
11
10
19
981
103
10
86
33
878
17
49
36
1192
607
1
3
44 J
16
686
12
261 326 1301 104
41! 1271 13 6 j 101
16
26
1014
171
8
77;
26
843

64) 396| 227i
20
1821
70
42 1606
29! 319j 1341 107|
40: 139! 119 1 961
I j 1 1
49 184 114 { 106'
19' 2831 138i 981
12
45 172
54; 116
148
18
26
1020
206
8
148
71
26
814
Representative—
66 169
50 160
6
176
62
24
925
II
148
39;
19
966
31
1
90
4
62 166 183
47 136! 126
271 134! 114
431 346' 1371 1131
611
291 8691
21,1004 ! 135
Sam M Hills, Dem .
A I McMahon .
District Judges—
W. A. Babcock ..
Henry F. Ensign .
W. T. Stafford .
Rex V. Wilcox ...
County Commissioner—
Anders Anderson, 1st Dlst. . . .
T I Roberson, Dem, 1st Dlst. . .
John W McFcll, 2d Dlst.
Robt J McMahon. Dem. 2d Diet
W T Patterson, Dem, 3d Dlst. .
F W Zimmerman. 3d Dlst .. ..
Clerfc of Court—
J W Lundln .
A D Williamson. Dem .
Sheriff—
DeWltt Quereau, Dem .
Clarence Whoeler .
14
23
I
14
32{ 243; 148! 146,
16' 279 106: 481
23! 149 631 46'
33 > 89 861 1001
34* 164! 181
26, 143; 1731
26Î 831 67
41 j 94! 106!
3 5
3311029
10j 8271
7j 480
14
14'
6
11
„ i
1
68
3 7
684;
36 308 1341 143 ;
2 6 137 96! 511
231 2971 1011 86
48' 187 130] 112
41 1811 118 ! 109)
231 2481 119j 991
I I
391 366, 169 148'
29* 112; 74! 64'
III
331 192) 73! 90;
87) 2981 179! 1181
i I I I
621 263: 971 120!
13' 2381 1711 88 1
12
48 190! 186!
48! 107 i 1321
40 166' 135
66! 119) 163!
62! 13 7 { 1541
3L 139' 135
44
39 1140, 485
111 655!
24 904! 13
24 891
15: 886! 43
26. 843'
6
42
12
21 '
6
571
8
10
14
18
68 170! 183
43: 124 127:
33
41,12261 597
81 628
4
63
|
1 Treasurer
0
56) 178! It5
48 127) 143
21 886
32 10241 138
69!
22
20
|
11
33.1103: 277
19 ^ 826
80 186! 1851
26 1181 129!
76
;
Stella Cook, Dem .
T B Brush .
Probate Judge —
James L Fuller .
F L Tillofson. Dem .
Co. Supt. of Schools—
Leah M Burnside. Republican
11
13
1
1
36 10731 306
14! 7681
16
38 3991 1611 106!
32 1421 89 : 931
I I I
49 4041 1801 166!
11
681 338 ) 160! 1361
161 128; 86 671
I i I
30i 160; 98
26' 2781 1181
I I '
38! 123! 991 931
26! 332) 1S1| 941
I I
46! 260' 1161 69
2?) 2211 1381 136j
II' 1
831 33 { 661 7 5 1
271 3091 116) 841
14! 63! 46| 32
32' 282 116: 97
141 72' 60! 32
35 273! 1221 105'
18 441 61I 39
29 278| 1171 861
14 311 3?! i"
31 278| 1131 82
30:
26; 160' 171
80 130) 133
66* 213; 223
2
c.-.
36 1396
16

'
Assessor—
Bert Bowler. Dorn .
Barnett Stillwell ....
Coroner—
D A L'Herlsson. Dem
John F Schmershall .
Surveyoi
Lyn Crandall. Dem .
Joe Vernon .
Prosecuting Attorney—
Harlan D Heist, Dem .
Frank C Smith.
Constitutional Amendments—
No. 1, Yeq .
No 1, No .
No. 2. Yes.
No, 2. No.•'
No. 3, Yes .
No. 3, No.
No. 4 Yes.
No. 4. No.
No, 6. Yes .
No, 6, No.
29 1120 398
24' 722
14
66
117! 164
1791 142!
60
6
26
80
21 697!
32 1036 339
471
4
103) 1051
186! 200:
94:
45
37|
16
93',
51
18 844
27 892 48
6
67'
161| 19 0 j
112! 103|
60
22
16
29
'
26 976! «5
26 910.
4 7
4
68 1631 1791
34: 135 1361
42
16
I
111 4031
13! 8271
171 3651
12! 775)
14 3621
151 8311
1 4 352)
161 7601
40|
2
69!
26
o'.
6
1
31 109 122
231 64 801
24 91 107!
14 451 81'
3« 111! 1121
23
4
12i
3
291
1
1 î
6
29!
241 64: 781
1
11!
«]i 96| 90'
1.2! 401 63
311 98| 94;
6
9
aoi
151 776
19|
6 i
pression —are In defeat.
On Monday morning President
Wilson issued the following procla
mation :
"My fellow countrymen;
"The armistice was signed th s
morning.
America fought has be in accomp
lished.
"It will now be our fortunate duty
to assist by example, by sober friend
ly counsel and by material aid In
the establishment of just lomocracy
throughout the world.
"WOODROW WILSON."
The clauses in the armistice, as It
was handed to the German delega
tion by Generalissimo Foch for the
appendix of their signatures were of
such a nature as to leave no loop
hole and the terms that the Germans
accepted are so stringent that it Is
impossible for the buns to renew the
conflict if they so desired and as a
Everything for which
military nation Germany is so weak- |
ened that no trouble is to be feared
I
I
quer the world or any part of it. The ;
Germane are more than edfeated ;
theirs is a lesson that will have its
of crowned heads ever trying to con
,
weight upon any nation of her breed ;
that will try to overpower free peo
plee tor their own selfish interests.
On last Friday night, in the tarn- '
porary hospital established in the !
Eagles Hail, occurred the death of
J. F. Sorrels from pneumonia follow- ,
I
J. P. SORRELS PARSES AWAY.
ing an attack of influença. The un
fortunate gentleman was sick but a
few days and although all possible
was done for his recovery. It was not
so to be and he answered the call of
the grim reaper,
Mr. Sorrels was among the early
settlers in Jerome, coming here with
his family at an early date to estab
lish his home, and was quite well
known over the tract
The deceased ieavea a wife -and
three sons, the youngest being only
18 months old, who will mourn the
loss of an affectionate father and
husband.
The funeral was held Saturday
with interment at Jerome cemetery.
A number of our exchange« bar«
been speculating on what would hap
pen If the government took over the
newspapers.
Well, the flrat thing
the subscription price would b«
raised about
60 per cent and the
sheriff would be kept bus ychaalng
delinquents. The next step would b«
to raise the wages 25 per cent and
editors who hadn't had a cent in six
months they could call their own,
would be placed on a salary,
merchants who fail to get their ad
Ttae
copy in until press day would b«
hauled up before the council of de
fense and our linotype man who hired
out for two weeks and quit hie job
In a week would be sent to Leaven
worth for about ten years aa a de
sorter. It looks like a good propotl
tlou and we are for It.

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