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Lincoln County times. (Jerome, Idaho) 1911-1919, November 14, 1918, Image 4

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APPLETON
*1 kr, ta fe -- A; a.-. » to
The Humphrey homes have been
under quarantine the past week. C.
H. Humphrey has nearly recovered
from Influenza, but L. C. Humphrey
Is still quite sick.
Election passed off with little ex
citement. A good many voters stay
ed at home. Booths were placed out
side the school house and votes pass
ed In to the judges through the win
dows. L. C. Humphrey was elected
Justice of peace and C. H. Smith con
stable for the third term.
Roscoe and Lester DeBoard went
to the South Side Sunday to help
their parents move to the Pizey
place. Mr. DeBoard. Sr„ will be in
partnership with his son Roscoe the
coming year.
Paul Pizey and J. H. Sillbaugh
baled hay this week and are ship
ping It from Appleton.
Wm. Sparks' children were sick
last week and placed under quaran-
tine which was lifted Friday.
-«a As
Are you ?. regular subscriber to
The Lincoln County Times? If not
subscribe today. $2.00 will pay
your subscription "rom now until
January 1st, 1920.
-Aa m -
fcBaRâSalBîlKatelBitelsa
ta
*3 ELDORADO HEIGHTS
ICi
M M M M
Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Frost and fam
ily and Mr, and Mrs. S. Knight spent
Sunday. Nov. 3, with Mrs. Cutts.
Mrs. Roy Mayfield Is enjoying a
fc\ ta te «R
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£
BRED EWES FOR SALE
I have on my ranch 2 miles north and 1 1-2
west of Jerome, about 100 bred ewes for sale,
bred to lamb early in February. Price
$10.00 Per Head
with 12 months' time. Reasons for selling are
that 1 have more sheep that I can convenient
ly handle on the ranch and, as I am not going
to range the coming summer must reduce the
flock.
A. C. ALEXANDER.
- l-H-l - l-l-l -
- H-l"'"! ' I 1 1 H - l - 1-1 - 1 1 1 1-1-l-H I 1 1 - h - 1 1 1 y I - 1I -- 1 -- 1T - 1 - I - I ■ i-l -
Jerome Hardware Company
JEROME, IDAHO
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'.CEL:
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Everybody's Attention
*
has been called to the remarkable
fuel saving secured with Cole's
Original Hot Blast Heaters.
Coal prices are soaring—why be a slave
to an extravagant heating plant or stove
that is a demon for fuel.
Join now in the great army of
satisfied users who have found
relief from high fuel bills
with the great fuel saving
S
COLE'S Original
Hot Blast Heater
Borns chsapest coal clean and bright Usas any fuel
Everybody bs searching for a way to save fuel
and food Here's your opportunity to
« cut your coal bills square in half and
k gain a perfectly heated home
well. Investigate now. Our Store
is Fuel Savers Headquarters.
as
N», in
visit from her mother, father and
brother from Wichita, Kans.
The Stevens and Pullner families
have all been sick with grippe, but
are improving at present.
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Wragg enjoy
ed Sunday dinner with Mr. and Mrs.
M. A. Bishop.
Reginald Bingham has been
with Spanish Influenza for the past
three weeks in the hospital at Van
couver, B. C. The latest report
to the effect that he Is able to be
around again.
Clarence King Is recovering from
an attack of inflammatory rheuma
tism.
The little daughter of A. B. Lov
ingood had the misfortune to fall
from her horse and break her arm
one day last week.
The two Loviugood families have
had a seige of influenza. All are Im
proving.
D. Oliver Brown and family are
also on the influenza list. They are
much Improved at present.
Mrs. M. K. Chess, Mrs. Dick Burks
and their mother, Mrs. Shepherd, re
centlwy spent a day In Shoshone.
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. King spenj
Sunday at the Byron Smith home.
Mrs Cotis and Henry tKerhurg
vi Red '■'unday afternoon with Mr.
ane Mrs. E. C. Frost.
Mis. Knight and Ida Bit ,na n vis
ited at the Smith home si-u'ay.
Mi. and Mrs. George Sa Rad a
mo 1 id into their new hone fuis
wed-.
Charles Kays and family moved
Tuesday into the home vacated by
Mr. and Mrs. George Salladay.
N. T. Jorgensen spent Monday ln
Shoshone,
The Fulkerson girls visite» Mrs
Frost Monday afternoon,
Dale Atwood Is acting as corporal
In the training school at Corvallis,
Oregon.
Falrmans' will probably hold the
record for the earliest spring frys.
A tine new hatch of chickens on Nov
ember 6th.
Subscribe for The Lincoln County
Times today,
any paper in the county,
pay your subscription from now
until Jan. 1st, 1920.
Largest circulation of
»2.00 will
RULES FOR MEASURING HAY.
I
In the measurement of hay there
are two points to be considered.
These are the number of cubic feet
required to make one ton and the
; method of determining the number
of cubic feet required to make one
ton and the method of determining
the number of cubic feet In the
' stack.
The following table gives the num
ber of cubic feet required to make
one ton of alfalfa at various seasons
j of settling, these ligures being ac
cepted as fair amounts to allow for
a ton :
No days
in stack,
j 39 ...
! 69 ...
No. cubic
ft. per ton.
.660
549
90
6X2
120 .
Late winter
486
460
Native hay packs more closely, the
usual figure being 422 cubic feet for
i one ton in a well-settled stack.
[ There are three general methods
j of arriving at the number of cubic
feet In the stack. All three methods
! require the width, length and over
measurement. The latter la the dis
tance from the ground on one side,
straight over the top to the ground
on the other side,
irregular It is best to secure
her of measurements for the width
and length and
and use the average.
Rule 1—One-fourth of the "over"
Where stacks are
a num
over-moasurement
multiplied by the width, thon mul
tiplied by the length and divided by
the required nui-iber of cubic feet to
make one ton. Thla rule gives accur
ate figures on small, squat stacks
when the width is from one-third to
one-half of the "over."
Last fall
experiment station
bought 98.66 tons by the use of this
rule and when weighed out It weigh
ed 98.18 tons.
an
Rule 2—Substract the width from
the over. Multiply one-half the re
sult by the width; multiply the pro
duct by the length; divide by the
number of cubic
make one ton.
curate when the width exceeds one
half the over.
Rule 3 (Government rule)—Width
plus 'over,' divided by
squared: then multiplied by length
and divided by the number of cubic
feet required to make one ton. This
rule Is satisfactory for large, tall
stacks from 25 to 45 tons, and favors
the seller with ordinary, small squat
stacks.
feet required to
This rule Is most ac
four ana
GOODING COLLEGE NOTES
According to the report of Presi
dent Charles Wesley Tenney. Good
ing College will start a number of
practical courses for the benefit of
those who have not been able to be
gin school before on account of sick
ness or of work at home,
courses will commence about Dec.
1 or as soon as the quarantine Is
raised and will Include bookkeeping,
shorthand, typewriting, spelling, pen
manship. practical English and
merclal arithmetic—just
Jects and Just the methods for the
young men and young women who
are somewhat out of touch with reg
ular school conditions and who wish
to do as much as psslble during the
winter months.
These
com
the sub
-h I« -
FUTURE OP WOOL INDUSTRY.
The sheep and wool Industry
vital to the life of the nation from
the standpoint of food and clothing.
After-war conditions are going to
place a hard strain on this Joint in
very
are
dustry and stability of prices Is
Important.
The normal clip of wool In
country is from 280.000,000 to 300,
000,000 pounds
our
a year, and we 1m
port as much more.
There hag been
some accumulation
of foreign wools
pended trade with the Central
Pr 8 and lack of shipping.
The great duty before the
on account of sus
pow
. people
of our country Is to hold and enlarge
flocks and supply
mutton for market.
We should produce
more wool and
490.000,000
pounds a year and the Industry should
be on the
up grade Instead of de
clining in production.
The government should Mobilize
prices for at least two years and
continue the present warehousing and
commission system of handling.
Subscribe for The Lincoln County
Times today. Largest circulation of
any paper In the county,
pay
82.00 will
your subscription from
until Jan. i»t, 1920.
now
PLENE8S MISDEMEANOR.
Governor Whitman of New York has
Just signed a bill to put an end to
loafing.
in some useful occupation, for at least
It makes failure to engage
36 hours a week a misdemeanor, pun
ishable by a tine of »100 or imprlson
ment for not more than three months.
This new law is modeled somewhat af
ter those In force In New Jersey and
Maryland, applying to all able-bodied
men between the ages of eighteen and
flfty. The purpose of the law Is to
put the non-military man power of the
country to work, and It should be en
forced In every state In the Union, says
Washington Star. Loafing, Idling, re
fusal to take a hand In some useful
occupation, Is at this Juncture positive
There Is need today for
disloyalty,
the services of every man In some line
of occupation. There is work for ev
eryone to do. In the cities or on the
farms, In the mills or In the unices.
An idle man Is a slacker as much as
though he were evading the draft.
There Is no excuse for him.
Whatever other blessings peace may
bring. It will not bring Instant relief
to the masses who are now distressed
by food shortage and Its natural con
sequence. high prices. There will be
as many mouths to feed when the ar
mies are demobilized as there are now.
says New Republic. It Is true that the
fare of the soldiers In most European
countries is more liberal than that of
the civil population, but no statesman
will take comfort In the prospect of
musses of disbanded soldiers reduced
to the level of civil undernourishment.
And besides, the civil populations that
are now enduring seml-starvutlon un
complainingly, recognizing that no re
lief can be expected while the energies
of their government are engrossed by
war, will be far less patient when
peace returns.
More food, not less.
will be required In peace.
A striking Illustration of the times
U the way In which all parties and
denominations are uniting In relief
work, the spirit of the times seeming
to be one of harmony and unity in
tills work so necessary for the con
quest of the war. in the universal
need, all prejudices and differences ap
pear to be forgotten, and thla amity
and friendship will have Its effect
lung after the war Is over, and dispos.
of much bitterness which existed be
fore the exigencies of the times
brought the melting pot of human kind
ness Into action.
One of the most objectionable fea
tures ol modern social life Is the prev
alence of hypocrisy and sham—of pre
tending to be and to have what
have not and are not. The attempt to
"keep up appearances" makes many
families miserable that might other
wise be happy. A plain-spoken rogue
Is safer company than a hypocritical
model of propriety.
you
A genealogical expert can dig np a
cost of arms and a family tree for you
tf you have the money, but you will
have to strangle your appetite for II
and onions and corned beef and cab
bage yourself. And
V • f
you may rig up.
powder, perfume, puff and manicure
a hick till kingdom come and
time he passes a livery stable the old
gray mule will bray.
♦•very
Joy riding may be checked, but tlu
Is still too much of It.
er Is a constant menace, and there Is
no protection by the public Itself from
him, the penalties ought to be deter
rent, so as to minimize casualties and
fatalities, since they cannot be entire
ly prevented as long as no sure way Is
found of parting a fool from his folly.
Tf
As the Joy rid
A report of the federal forest service
Just Issued states that of 7,814 forest
fires on government lands during 1017
•H but 2,132
agencies.
urea are correct, nature In this descrip
tion of wastefulness Is only one-third
a« destructive
were caused by human
In other words, If these flg
as man.
If the calculation be
reliable that
Luther Burbank's new variety of wheat
will Increase the food
American crop by 100
Is not disant when this
fort will he ;
value of the
per cent, a time
country's ef-/
o get people to eat wheat
Instead of arguing with them to
save
It.
England reports a shortage of hair
pins. How
on earth do the poor wom
en button their shoes and gloves and
open locks when they've lost the keys?
And what do they use as a substitute
to bold In their months when, they're
combing their hair or putting on a veil?
EMBARGO
LIFTED!
On Lumber, Cement, Lime
Brick.
Jerome, Noe. 14,
yon material for Improvement*
to too thousand dotiere.
and
We can sell
up
Home Lumber & Goal Go.
OMSNIKKI) LOCAIX
_|
Kates—A lines or less, 25 cents per
|M, r u*ue.
|m» U e; over A lines, A cent, per line
All readers In the elassi
fled columns to be paid In advance.
FOR SALE— Holsteins and Short
horns, fresh and springers; also some
tine stockera.
Oliver.
Small heater.—O.
39-lt
120
acres at 1'lcabo; 70 a In cultivation;
all but 10 a llrst class; fenced and
cross fenced; good stream of water;
no buildings.
E. Eckert, Rt. 4. Jeiumo.
watered
FOR SALE- Well
Trado or terms,—F.
3 9-2tz
FOR SALE—Ford touring car, a
1917 model In good condition. $350
cash. Inquire of Times.
39-2tz
potato
s» r ters, In good condition. »In. »15,
$29.00. Frasers-Pence Co. 36
FOR SALE—Improved 89, B ml.
north and 2 miles west of Jeromo;
telephone and rural delivery route.
M. A. Bishop, Jerome.
39-2lz
FOR SALE.—Potato and
sacks at Frasor-Pence Co.
grain
3 2
FOR SALE—3 Oreeley
FOR SALE OR TRADE- Practic
ally new Smith and Barnes Player
Piano. Will trade for good team or
cattle. Inquire at this office.
33-tf
FOR SALE.—Fine raw 89 Some
cleared. $71 an acre. Good terma.
Barnett Stillwell.
FOR SALE.—1
i ut SO a, rca, $89 99.
mares with harness,
$225.90. G. W. Dewey
Moline mower.
1 team of
weight 2100.
21-tf
FDR SALE 125 pure bred Lin
coln Ewes, 50 good feeder lambs;
prices reasonable.
3 miles S. E. of Jerome.
III
Wilson Broai,
3 9-2t
FOR SALE—Have 118 head of
bred ewes for sale,
bred to lamb early In Feb.—A L.
Dewhlrst, Pone 3 9K2
These are a
3 9-ltz
FOR SALE—Full blood Jersey
cow 4 years old, giving 2 gallons dal
ly; will freshen February 1st —H.
M. Hall 2d. 2 miles N, 1 Vi W. 39tf
WHEN you want to buy or sell
real estate see MacGowan ft Eichel
berger
FIRE INSURANCE In old relia
ble companies. See Wm. A. Peters.
Post Offjce Bldg.
HENS FOR SALE—Laying hens
and 25 pullets, mostly Rhode Island i
Reds
13-tf
6-tf.
Pullets should be laying bo-i
fore first of year.— W. P. W. Veazlo, 1
3 south 3 west, Vi south Jerome. 39 '
-barn,
WM. A. PETERS can write youp '
Compensation Insurance with the
Aetna, the strongest. tf.
_I
FOR SALE Good,
wagon with box; nlso one
heavy work harness,
office.
light-weight
set of
Inquire at this
33-tf
FOR SALE—Good team of work
horses weighing about 1290 each
will sell cheap. Also u set of good i
heavy work harness. J. N Shepherd,
7 miles north and 1 Vi east
_____
FOR SALE—3 Greeley potato
sorters, In good condition. »10 115
»20.09, Frasers-Pence Co. ' »«

COMBINATION RANCHES .
have for sale some fine lend proposl
lions consisting of Irrigated lands
In Lincoln and Gooding round** mid
pasture lands on Camas Pralrlu (out !
hills near-the Forest Reserve where
you can own a farm here and get
summer range and own one In the
Irrigated districts. AND GET RICH j
Write to Thomas Henry Scruggs
Land Company. Hill City. Idaho
Bo* 81. 3 »- 4 *
I
WANTED
WANTED.—Farm
loans.
either
first mortgage or subject to the wat
er contract.
W. A. Heiss
19
WANTED Farm Loan .
at First National Bank.
'nq nlre
tf.
WANTED, JOB
Man to work,
wife to take rare of house Would
handle smalt truck garden on shares
and work for wages rest of time; 12
years' experience trucking and
nlng.—8. C. Medley,
W. T. Veazle. .
ran
Route 2, co
3»-2lz
lllli
IZOmilliotx
Jellies
must eat
United State» Food Administration
w
WANTED—Junk. We
market for and will pay the high™?
cash price for old Iron, rubber
per. zinc and Junk of all kinds'
Wheeler Bros., opposite Jerome
ery.
cop.
See
Uv
62-tf
Ik YOUR buildings, shack, house
hold goods and other property
not covered by Insurance
loss by tire better see MacGo
Eichelberger.
ii re
against
w an and
13-tf.
WANTED—Farm Loans,
at First National Bank.
Inquire
tf.
I HAVE plenty of money for fum
loans. W. A. Holes " rn -
19
WE WANT SALES REPRESENT
ATI V ES IN EVERY TOWN IN IDa
HO We prefer men who have sola
stock, Insurance, real estate, book«
or who have had no sales experience
but would like to develop Into .i,..*
We train every applies, and
provide a system that will enabl«.
anyone who works to make from
to *150 per week. Can also
women of exceptional ability
Hon permanent. In applying S | atfl
age, past business experience ,,uin
ber of years you have lived In ,om'
"'Unity, and references A(1(ln , S8 £
^"hjld^hce. CO., 1626
" 1 1,1,1 » • Seattle Wash
J9-3t
men.
»76
18«
Pus).
MISCELLANEOUS
MONEY TO LÖAN
farms, first mortgage
the water right. W. A. Helsa
Improved
subject to
on
Ml
It
IS YOUR AUTO Insured
see Wm. A.
, . If not
> eters. Post Office Bldg.
If.
PARTY who took hive of beet
from my place Is known; if r-turned
from where taken no questions wm
be asked.— U B. McCament. 39-R
JEROME VULCNAIZINi; WORKS
—Up-to-date vulcanizing plum
ns a trial. Satisfaction
Tubes and casings
short notice. Leave lube»
Dags at Frasers-Pence f
Give
guaranteed
vulcanized
01,
and ca*.
HOFFMAN and W. W GODFREY^
< ■
FARM LOANS. Abstrhti, ln«ur
Lincoln Loan k Title Com
patir, W D. Garlock. President. S'
shone. Idaho, Box 177. The olde*
set of abstract books for Lincoln
county.
.1 IM I
60-tf
FOR HALE
40 acres. 6 miles out, all In culti
vation. $140 per acre.
40 acres, 3 miles out. all In culti
vation, $160 per acre.
»<> acres. 3 miles out. all In cultl
ration, with small house. »126
per
tt,re
acres close to Falls City, fence!
w »*woven wire, small bouse tad
all cleared, quick bnstawi
»'» P> ,r acre.
160 acres close to switch, all clew
26 acres (n alfalfa, small home,
good land. $116 per acre.
8 0 acres close to Falls City, 12
Improved, good land, $185 per acre
W. A. HEISS, Jerome. Idaho.
»(-41
ward r ° r c < u "' of < 'Man* thu
cannot be cured by Halls fatirr*
Medicine.
Hall s Catarrh Medicine hjj bw
"* ken b ) r c " turrh sufferers for U*
I'"* 1 H>lrty-flve years, und lui In
come known as the mosi rslUMt
remedy for Catarrh Hall's Csurrt
HOW'S THIS?
We offer One Hundred Dolhn Re
u ..
•'*«**»» »«« acts thru the blood ont*
mucou * surfaces, expelling (ht p*
110,1 ^ roln *bo blood and h**i.lln| I»
,llHea * e, l portions
After you have tuken Ball« Ct
,arrlj Medicine for a -hurt timer*
w111 "*' p a * r * ,at Improvemsst ■
your B«noral health Start Isttl
Hall'kJ'iHarrh Medicine at out*»*»
r,a of cntarrh s, ' n ' 1 for
mon la Is, free.
F. J. CHENEY ft Co . Toledo, 0*k
Sold by all Drugglns, 75«.
tf S.V-2PÄ«*»
HEN inneedot
Printing see
what we can
- do before yoi
■ go elsewhcr'l

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