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Lincoln County times. (Jerome, Idaho) 1911-1919, December 05, 1918, Image 1

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H PAGER
8 PAOKH
North» Side Tract.
Week I y
Newspaper Devoted to the Interests of the Settlors
of t h»
VOL. ».
NO. «a.
•2.00 PER YEAR
JEROME, IDAHO. DECEMBER 5, 191».
P—. -
KEPT PLEDGE
TO SEND BREAD
American Nation Maintained Al
lied Loaf Through Sell
Denial at Home Table.
AVERTED EUROPEAN DESPAIR
With Military Demands Upon Ocean
•hipping Relieved, World It Able
te Return to Normal White
Wheat Bread.
Since the advent of the latest wheat
crop the only limitation upon Amerl
can exports to Europe lias been the
shortage of shipping. Between July 1
and October 10 we shipped (15,l)H0,H0r.
bushels. If this rate should continue
until the end of the fiscal year we will
have furnished the Allies with more
than 287.500,999 bushels of wheat and
flour In terms of wheat.
The result of Increased production
sod conservation efforts in the United
States has been that with the cessa
tlon of hostilities we are able to re
turn to a normal wheat diet. Supplies
that have accumulated In Australia
Argentine and other hliherto luacces
slide markets tuny be lapped by ships
vrvlce, and
released from transport
European demand for American wheat
probably will not exceed our normal
surplus. There Is wheat enough avail
side lo have a white loaf at (he com
won table.
But last year the lale was different
Ouly by the greatest possible saving
and sacrifice were we able to keep a
steady stream of wheat and flour mov
lag across the sea We found our
selves ul the beginning of the hurves
year with an unusually short crop
E»en the most optimistic statistician»
figured (bat we hud a bare surplus of
29.090,900 bushels. And yet Europe
was facing the probability of s bread
famine—and tu Europe bread Is by far
the most Important article tu the diet
All of this surplus had left the
country early In the full. By the first
of Ute year we had managed to ship a
little more than 50.090.000 bushels by
practicing the utmost economy si
home—by whealless days, wheatleas
meals, heavy substitution of other
cereals and by sacrifice at almost
every meal throughout the country.
la January the lute lz>rd llhomldn.
then British Food Controller, cabled
that only If we sent an additional 75.
099,000 bushels before July 1 could In
take the responsibility of assuring his
people that they would be fed.
The response of the American peo
pie was 85,990 090 bushels safely deliv
ered overseas between January I and
July 1. Out of a harvest which gav»
us only 20,009.000 bushels surplus we
actually shipped U 1,000OoO bushels.
Thus did America fulfill her pledge
that the Allied bread rations could he
iniiltiiaineil, and already the American
peupu- are demonstrating that, with
an awakened war conscience, last
year's figures will be betten »1
+ + + + •!• + + + + + + + +•<• + ++ + +
+
+
+ Onr exports since » country +
+ entered the war have J Ilfli-d a +
+ statement made by the I .«»J Ad +
+ ministration shortly after Ils eon +
+ ceptlon, outlining the principles +
+ and policies (hat would govern +
+ the solution of this country'« +
+ food problems.
+ "The whole found«t Ion of rte +
+ moernry." declared ihe Food Art +
+ minim ration, "Ilea In the Imll +
+ virtual Initiative of Ha peopl +
+ and il». dr wdllngncs* to serve the +
+ Interests of the na'ion wlih com- 4»
+ plete self effacement In the Mine +
+ of emergency.
+ yield to discipline,
+ solve this food problem for our +
+ own people and for the Allies In +
+ this way.
+ have been n grenier servies than +
+ onr Immediate objective, for we +
+ have demonstrated the rightful +
+ ness of our faith and our ability +
+ lo defend ourselves without be- +
+ log Prussianized."
+
Democracy oltn +
ml we can +
To have done so will +
+
+
4
+ + + + + + + + 4. 4 4 4 444 t 444
GREATEST OPPORTUNITY
WOMEN EVER HAD
h »«« given lo the women of (his
rmnilry i<> perforin Ihe grealcai
by In Hie winning of the
■ufert to
serv
eur vouch
any women In the history ol
lhv wuis of the world - to feed the
w nrrtoi» and the war »uffi-rcrs. By
the in«
of peace, tlie practice of slm
Ph'. homely virtues the womanhood of
• whole nation served humanity In Its
profoundeat struggle for peace and
: freedom.
♦♦♦tt444*44**444444
J RIR8T CALL TO FOOD
This co-npurntlou snd service
ssk of all In full confidence
T America will render more
fur dag and freedom limn king
ruldj-n people surrender m com
* pulslun,—Herbert Hoover.
J ««st 10. 1917.
[*!♦♦♦♦ ♦.♦♦♦♦♦♦♦>♦«
ARMY.

Au
♦ ♦♦♦
MUST INCREASE
FOOD EXPORTS
America Called on by End of
War to Supply Added
Millions.
ECONOMY STILL NEEDED.
Ovsr Thro« Times Pre-War Shipments
Required—Situation In Wheat and
Fata Proves Government's
Policy Sound.
With the Kims In Europe silenced,
we have now to consldei a new world
food situation. Uui (here cun be
hope that the volume of our exports
can be lightened to the slightest de
gree with tile cessation of hostilities
Millions of people liberated fron
ITusslun yoke are now
upon us for the food which
them from starvation.
With food the United States made
It possible for the forces of democ
racy to hold out to victory. To insure
democracy In the world, we must con
ttnue to live simply In order that
may supply these liberated nations of
Enrol.« with food,
people Inevitably
American food must complete the work
of making the world safe for democ
no
the
depending
vlll keep
we
Hunger among n
breeds anarchy
racy.
I -MSI year we tent 11,820,000 tons of
food to Europe. For Hie present year,
with only the European Allies to feed,
we had originally pledged ourselves to
a program that would have increased
our exisirts to 17,509,090 tons. Now,
lo feed the liberated nations, we will
have to export a total of not less than
20.000,000 toas—practically the limit
of loading capacity at our porta Re
viewing the world food situation, we
And that some foods will he obtainable
In quantities sufficient to meet all
world needs under a regime of eco
nomical consumption. On the oilier
hand, there will be marked world
shortages In some Important commodi
ties.
slide lo shipping, there urc bread
grains enough lo enable the nation» to
rcium to UiHr normal wheat loaf,
(
Return to Normal Bread Loaf.
With the enlarged wheel crops
which American farmers have grown, I
and the supplies of Australia, Ihc Ar
geutlue and other markets now accès
provided we continue to mill (lour it I
u high percentage of extraction
maintain economy In ruling and the
avoidance of waslc
lu fuis there will he a heavy short
age — a hon i 8.000.000,000 pounds — In
l»»rk products,
vegetable oils
shortage of iihom three million tons
In rich protein feeds for dairy »id
dairy products and
While there will bo s
m»U, there will be sufficient supplies
of oilier feed muds to allow economical
consutnptlon.
In the mailer of b»*ef. the world's
supplies are limited lo the capacity of
the available refrigerating ships. The
supplies of beef In Australia, ihc Ar
gentlne and the United Slates are suf
flclent to load these ships. There will
be a shortage In the importing coun
tries, but we cannot hope lo expand
ex|M»rt» materially for the next inoiiil»»
lu view of the boule uyck lo Irans
port n tlon
We will have a sufllclenl supply ol
sugar to allow normal consumption In
ibis country If the other nations re
tain their present short rations or In
Fur tin
crease them only slightly.
•ounlrles of Europe, however, lo In
crease their present »allot»« I
lorlal extent will necessitate our shnr
a inn
Ing a pari of our own supplies
them.
vl tb
Of the world total, North America
will furnish more than 00 per cent
The United Stales, Including the Wesi
Indies, will he called upon lo furnish
20,000,000 tons of food of all kinds u
compared with our pre-war exporta ol
nlionl 0,000,000 tons
While we will he able to change out
In many respecta, even a
vorld supplies
program
casual survey of the
In comparison to world »leinmnls show*
conclusively that Euroite
famine unless tha
bring their home consumption down
to the barest minimum ihul will main
lain health «ml strength.
III kn
peopl»
American
-»»millions of famine li
There are
Europe Ihal will he beyond om power
to remedy.
pie In North Russia
small chance of reaching with food
Their transportation is
There are 40,990,090 pci
vhom liiere b
this winter,
demoralized la complete anarchy, und
shortly many of their ports wip be
If Internal transport
frozen,
e\ »•«
could be realized.
To Preserve Civilisation.
At this moment Germany has not
alone sucked ihe food and animals
from nil those masses of people
has dominated mid left starving, hut
she bus left behind her a total wreek
age of hu'lnl Institutions, and
murin of iKMipli* is now confronted will«
aboolnte anarchy .
if wo vain»' ">»r own safety and th
Uoeir. we cannot permit growth of thU
'Z.MhrÄ nnnrchr
SHADOW OF THE GROSS" AT CAMP MACARTHUR
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æ^siStCs Photo
Veattrn N e wapa jRrUnjon
..
In this photograph of Cutup MacArthur. Waco, Tex., the "Shadow
was considerable excitement among the boys until one discovered that the shadow
stovepipe and electric wire crossing on the top of each tent.
Of the fin
f is seen on every lent. Thei e
crosses were caused liy the
From the Inability of governments to
secure food for their people grows
revolution and chaos. From and abil
ity to aupply their people grows sta
bility of government and the defeat
of anarchy. Did we put it on no
higher plane than our interests in
the protection of our Institutions, we
must bestir ourselves In solution of
this problem.
-fkl He
RED CROSS XMAS ROLL CALL
'the Rod Cross will take place from
December 18 to 23, Inclusive, formal
announcement thereof being made
through the following statement au
thorlzed by H, P. Davidson, chair
man of the war council.
— H> —
Membership Uni 0|m-ii to the Whole
American» People December lO
to 2d—Population the Limit.
A Christmas roll call of the whole
American people for membership in
will be open for every American
p, eV ery corner of the world, so that
not only that America can tight, but
.ihut
"From December 16 to 23, the
It may be known that the whole na
lion at home and abroad.is register
ed for the cause.
The Red Cross
wants again lo give the world notice
the Iasi man, woman and
I child we sand four square for mercy,
to
honor and good faith among the na
tiuns.
"AI the close of the Christraa.
membership campaign of 1917 there
were 22.000,000 Americans enrolled
In the Red. Cross. There are also
8,000,000 members In the Junior
Red Cross.
"This year, both as a Christmas
loyalty, the
observance and as a renewal of the
nation-wide pledge of
Red Cross will again pul before ev
ery one the duty of standing by the
Cross, In this
(lag; for the Red
great fight for peace represents the
whole spirit of what we are fighting
for
"This will not be a call for money.
It will bo a summons to Americans
everywhere to Hue up for the Afiteri
can ideal.
We cannot all fight, but
this one thing everybody can do.
fee
Half of this remains with the
$ 1 . 00 .
local chapter, to be used for expens
and for relief of our soldiers and
their families; the other half goes
to the national treasury.
"There will be no allotment of quo
The quota In
district will he the limit of Us
es
tas to any community.
every
adult population.
"When the roll call comes, every
American, old or young, will be call-i
ed on to register and add Ihe weight
of his name lo th»» Rod Cross mes
sage.
"Let us answer with onu voh-e lo
the word of President Wilson when
T summon you to com
be said;
rndeshlp.'"
NOTICE
To All Canal Company Stockholders
Your directors have been advised
thn , R 1. now then--duty to file «
»en upon all land on which the main
tenance is not ppld. This will be do ■
before .lannnry first next.
, As this Is a hew ruling, we desn
to give this notice so that i'll now
1 delinquent may save costs by prompt
I payment of all arrears. v
ple((8e lve this your early alien
The same rule ..-,
trymen CANAL COM FAN Y.
Si 4«.
COUNTY BOARD MEETING.
Oct.ilx-r, 191», Session of the Board
of County Homuiissioners.
Third Day Ses.Hi.jfl» Nov. 25.
The Board of County Commission
ers met this day pursuant to law.
with the following members present:
W. J. Tipper, Chairman, Anders An
derson.
Robert J. McMahon, Com
missioners, J. W. Lundin, Clerk.
The bond of the Clerk of the Dis
trict Court Is ordered for the sum
of $10,1)00.00 The County Treasur
er's bond for $17,000,00.
The following claims were allow
ed or disallowed:
Claimant. Nature of Claim Ail'd.
Shoshone Journal, supplies
.q,iSnowed $ 24 . 60 , ail'd . $ 6 00
g ho8hone journal, supplies. . 332,00
H G . Av ery. salary, oxpe.wee 167.03
^ q Avery, exp. hay market 183.42
jj g Mlckelwalt, jurors cert 2.20
'Lincoln Co. Times, supplies 1T4 10
W. S. Purkhurst. jucllce. . . .
M. L. Kldwoll. labor election
J W. Lundin, filing fees...
J. H. Daggett, registering
voters, disallowed $8. aid
Eleanor Anderson, assisting
Co. Treasurer .
] Arrow Press, supplies .
! L. D. Dysart, ju-or's cert'..
Whereupon the Board took i
css until Dec. 9. 1918.
\V. J. TAPPER, Chairman.
VU est : J W. LUNDIN. Clerk.
1
24.00
9.00
14.00
37.30
40.6«
5,00
2.20
!
Hr.
PEACE AND PRICES.
— Hf.—
One of the first statements coming
department following
from the war
Ihe signing of Ihe armistice was to
the effect that more than a billion
dollars worth of contracts had been
That was but the begin-1
cancelled.
| ning of the retirement of Uncle Sam
from the buying counter and the
start on the return trip to conditions
i of peace In our industrial life.
Roughly calculated the trade har
han twice as high
Statistics furnished
«meter is more
in July 1914.
Dun show that provisions,
clothing, metals and every kind
und trebled
• by R G
Is j commodity doubled
prices between July. I860, and Sep
effects of
tember. 1864.
civil war also radically
prices In European
,md of the civil war was In sight in
the fall of 1864. and the decline in
prices dotes from that period. It
continued until the midsummer of
in all commodities th»* peace
The
affected the
The
countries.
rise in the United States.
words for every dollar the typical
during the civil
1869.
decline amounted to 77.5 of the war
In other
commodity went up
war It went down 75c in the follow-1
The first radical drop
»stored
lug five years,
was in wages, hut this was r.
considerably, and the rise continued
until the panic of 1878. when labor,
setback from
a serious
hioh it recovered gradually in «ho
Materials used In all
started rapidly
received
liming years
branches of Industry
on the decline In 1864. andIvory'«.on
.here was ».
";- r ^ 1 ' found
or recousu price
« level ' a fo
amounting o a i ,
Ami there the town
lucre-used
until new condl
and new
(,» vour
back
<*d for many years,
Hons made
.'Hees ^ ^
question : "Will prices go
I where they were before the war?
values
new
answer
NOTICE.
Your attention Is called I
the
Importance of putting in your win
ter supply of fuel without delay, if
you have not already done so.
1 am advised that a very serious
problem confronts the fuel adminis
tration in procuring an ample supply
of fuel in proper season, and It is
very desirable that your requirements
be In the hands of your dealer, so
that he may secure early delivery
from the mines.
vait until the last mi »ate.
You know that you are going to need
the coal, so provide for It now.
R. E. SHEPHERD.
County Fuel Administrator.
Don't
BETTER ROADS.
In providing work for discharged
soldiers and sailors and munition
workers, road building offers a solu
tion of many problems. The United
States as a whole is behind most for
eign countries in the matter of good
highways. Poor roads are a reason
for high prices of farm produce in
many cases. They are a reason why
more automobiles are not purchased
and used. They are a reason for
heavy upkeep cost of vehicles of all
kinds. They are a cause of many
1 accidents. They are a hindrance to
suburban and country development;
» cause of low prices of real estate
in country sections; a reason. In
short, for slower development of
I national industry and production
i than should be expected of a country
as progressive as ours claims to be.
Colonel Robert H. Tyndall of the
150th Field Artillery, U. S. army,
writing from France, says; "There
will be a couple of million real road
war boosters when the war is over."
He speaks in glowing terms of the
they found in
| splendid highways
France comparing them much to the
detriment with the average highway
tuiind in the United States.
In the .same article containing Col.
J Tyndall's views, it was stated that
\ there Is undoubtedly a big road plan
CUalr
developing in this country,
man George C. Diehl of the A. A. A
Good Roads Board says: "$100,000,
000 a year appropriated by the Fed
Government on a definite, tangi
l o m,
partly made up of sections alrca.lx
sufilcient In quality; partly in set
Hons to repair; partly of sections re
built and partly of
will work won
hie highway system
ders In the form of from 5000 to
if splendid highway
miles
the construction
| slmuld enormously Increase road ex
Tho thousands of other
entirely new
construction
prlatlon should be encouraged and
federal roads
Slate and local appro
of
pend It ures.
( wise unemployed labor can be used
to the most excellent advantage
this way.
The vast sums
wise have been spent In destruction
be expended for
in
that would other
highway construction
that trade may he Increased between
i and urban point
of thousands of returning
beneficially
can
d
to the »'in
rural sections
^ men tha. have been em
ployed In munition manufacture can
; be employed profitably to themselves
hloh they
and to the communities of
part In this highway work with
result that tradesmen will enjoy
arc a
tho
increased trade, laborers will be con
tented. farmers will have more acces
slide markets and the community as
whole will enjoy increased prosper
By.
l
DEAD MINISTER'S FAMILY
ARK VICTIMS OF EPIDEMIC
Wife and Five Children of Lat« Kev.
li. L. Andrew» Critically 111—
Hemaiii» Are Hrou^bt Home.
We clip the following from the
Twin Falle Newa which speaicB of
the death of a former resident of Je
Mr. Andrews was pastor of
church here a few
rome.
the Methodist
yeare ago:
Rev. U. L. Andrews, who died on
Sunday last at Castleford from pneu
monia following influenza, had been
resident of the Minidoka project
tor several years. He homesteaded
farm on the west end when the
project was in its Infancy. He mov
ed with his family to Castleford
about a year ago. He was a Metho
dist minister and had Ailed the pul
pit here as well us at Castleford.
Recently Mr. Andrews had rented
farm near here and Mrs. Andrews
and their live children had moved up
here a week before his death. All
of the members of his family, as
well as those of bis brother. Kit An
drews, residing here, are suffering
now from influenza.
The remains of Mr. Andrews were
brought here Tuesday aard short bur
ial servl.es at the cemetery were
conducted by Rev. G. W. Barnes.
Memorial services In honor of Mr.
Andrews will be held as soon os the
family has recovered.
WILL ASK FOB NEW LAWS.
Stale Societies of Idaho Will Ask a
Board of Control fur irrigation
and Market Matters.
F. A. Wilkie, state engineer, says
that there will be a determined effort
made in the coming Idaho legislature*
to amend the exlsiting laws and
make new ones with relation to the
management of the state's irrigation
water.
At the present time the State Land
Board controls all irrigation matters
and it is understood that ways and
iinm na will be thoroughly discussed
at the joint conference of agricultural
livestick, engineering and Irrigation
societies of Idaho to be held at Twin
Falls, January 13 to 16, to take this
ontrol from the land board and
place it with a state fcoard of con
trol to be created. This board would
Iso have power to settle all disputes
arising lu connection with irrigation
problems. Interested parties would
have the right to appeal to the courts
from the decisions of the board. This
would relieve the courts of a great
litigation which could
c
..
amount of
easily be settled otherwise.*
Prominent jurists of Idaho have
expressed the opinion
vhlch
frequently
that most irrigation troubles
brought iuto court could be set
led by such a board.
Another question of vital Interest
the farmer which will be taken
are
t
to
by the Joint Conference la that of
Prior to the fixing of
up
marketing,
prices by the government the farm
produce in a
less haphazard manner and
that unless
marketed their
ers
more or
present indications are
definite action is taken those
some
same
soon as
ed.
the farm markets bureau will be In
Twin Falls at tho joint conference
to discuss with the farmers the mat
of remedying this unsatisfactory
methods will prevail again as
government control is relox
Government and state hands of
1er
condition.
The joint conference was organ
ic the government's
Red in answer
call for conservation and increased
The meetings were held
the
production,
last year
change
the conference this year
a very great value as plans
made for procuring expert advice
practically every question that the
farmer will have to meet in the
In
at Idaho Falls,
from a war to a peace basis
will be of
have been
on
great change.
Associai ions
of the Idaho
Some
iclpatlng In the joint conference
The Idaho Society of Engin»
Coniçresô.
pa rt
are:
Idaho Irrigation
Roads Association. L'.aho State Llve
Sto-k Association. Idaho Slate Dairy
men's Association. Idaho Slate Swine
Idaho Wool
ers.
G ood
Association.
Association.
Association.
Association,
Growers
Growers
Growers
Growers
Producers Association.
Growers Association,
Throehormen. Idaho Poultry and 1 -t
Stoi k Association. Cattle and Horse
men's Association. Federated Rarai
Women's Clubs.
Seed
Idah
Idaho Potato
Idaho Honey
Idaho Beet
liluho
State
Conuty
circulation of
$2.00 will
uow
for The Lincoln
Largest
In the county.
bscrlptlon from
Subscribe
Times today.
any paper
pay your
until Jan- 1st, 1920.
BU

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