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Lincoln County times. (Jerome, Idaho) 1911-1919, December 26, 1918, Image 1

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8 PACKS
of tha North Side Tract.
Weekly Newspaper Devoted to the interests of the Settlers
VOU 8
NO. 4«.
«LOO PKK YEAR
JKROMU IDAHO. DECEMBER Ü0, 1018.
THE REAL STORY OP
THE LIBERTY MOTOR
It is now .disclosed that the
ous Liberty Motor, In Us
fam
essentials,
was developed In this country months
before the war by the Packard Motor
Car Company.
Uncle 8am made the Liberty Mo
tor under patent license from
company and all
that
;
pro -1
no other country, |
did much to discourage the Germans,
Commonly believed that two Invent-1
rights return to
auto concern with
The Lib
peace.
erty Motor, one of the best In the
world, and backed by quantity
ductlon possible in
ors locked
in Washington hotel i
war period, j
five days,
Thelr work consisted of revisions and 1
refinements on motor already devel
oped by Packard Co. at cost of $400,
00 °
By a technical oversight, and a
possible profit of $66.14, the actual
creator of the Liberty Motor, Lieut.- 1
Colonel Jesse G. Vincent, though
acquitted of any Intent to defraud
apartment, early In our
designed this motor
in
tbe government, became liable to
prosecution. This technical violation
occurred while the Liberty Motor
was being worked out. Mr, Vincent
gave up $26,000 a year for a Major's
salary.
HOLD YOUR LIBERTY' BONDS.
Ho^d your Liberty Bonds and War
Savings Certifiâtes. Hold them first,
because they are the best Investment
inthe world backed by every resource
In the United States Is the appeal of
Secretary of the Treasury William
O. McAdoo. as sent to Twelf»h Fed
eral Reserve District Llbertv Loan
headquarters.
Following Is the secretary's slate
ment:
"Hold your Liberty Bonds and
War Savings Certificates. Hold them
first, because they are the best In
vestment in the world backed by ev
ery resource I nthe United States
"Hold them because you have
made sacrifices to buy them. Why
on to someone else the contract
pass
you have entered Into with your gov
ernment?
"Hold them because, even though
the war may be over. It has not yet
been paid for. The treasury depart
ment must soon Issue more bonds
Every sale now made by you makes
future government Issues more dif
ficult and more expensive. This ex
pense can be borne only by the peo
ple of the United States; therefore,
why add to the already large burden?
Hold them because the time may
when such an investment will
come
prove to be a true friend In time of
need, a guarantee against the fear of
debt and Insurance against real hard
ships
"Hold them because the need for
saving Is not over. Government ex
penses are today larger than at any
: time during the war. Our boys In
j France and Germany must be paid
1 and fed and clothed, and, when their
transported
NOT QUIT.
home.
WHY
work Is over
THEY HAVE
SHOULD YOU?
"Hold your Liberty Bonds Instead
of exchanging them for some other
•o-ctlled 'security' because you know
the security of your United States
bond and cannot often know the
worth of what Is offered In exchange.
The 'get rich quick' crook Is ready to
steal your bonds from you at the
first opportunity.
j "Hold them because of the Inter
est they pay. Hold them because It
Is good business to do so. What
[good will the Idle pleasure of need
lless luxury bought today with the
(proceeds of your bonds be to you a
pear from now? Your bond works
■for you, drawing Intereat day and
■night, week days and Sundaya.
I "HOLD YOUR BONDS. DON'T
IDE A QUITTER; BE A POTRIOT "
THE FARM.
leifarw Measure Advocated by the
Secretary of Agriculture.
In a recent Interview between Dav
1 P- Houston, secretary of africai
ne, and the editors of a number
I agricultural journals. Mr. Houston
pressed in substance the following
,Wi with reference to mattere of
terest In connection with the farm
f Industries of the country.
Reconstruction
plans should In
resumptton of tha building of
hways under the Federal AJd
id Act; creation of a system of
•onal credit unions for firmer*;
ietnatic supervision of land aattle
provlsions for safe-guarding
de
t;
fight* of tenants and
farm
•ncotirag
ownershlp; continuation of
> ernment supervision of atook
fd* and related Induatrlea; and
*n»lon of benefit! of modern medt
* "id sanitation to rural district«.
During this Interview, Mr. Hous
ton expressed the vie* that agricul
ture was probably the beat prepared
Industry In the nation when the
came and that It would be the first
to readjust Itself to after-war condi
tions, although he Is Inclined to feel
that neither the farm nor the farmer
war
can ever get back to the precise con
diton that existed before the
Secretary Houston %iso stated that
in his opinion one of the vitally 1m
Portant measures of the reconstruc
t^on period is public highway im
war.
provement and he suggested that
that
sumed
for
reason, such work should be re
as soon as possible.
pears that under the
It ap
act above men
tloned Federal and State funds which
although appropriated for the bulld
lug of roads have not been expended
because of war conditions, will
amount during the present year to
[approximately $76,^00.000 and It is
the Secretary's view that roadbuild
Ing constitutes a worthy project on
w-hlch to employ a large portion of
the surplus labor supply likely to
suit from the shutting down of war
re
industries and the demobilization of
the army.
Wllh reference to credit unions the
Secretary called attention to the fact
that, although farmers with proper
security can readily obtain loans
from the Farm Loan Banks, some
convenient means should be provided
for the furnishing of financial assist
ance to farmers who are not In a
position to furnish real-estate secur
ity for such loans. In this connec
tion he suggests that personal credit
unions, established preferably by the
State Governments would satisfactor
ily answer the purpose.
Regarding the matter of land for
returning soldiers who wish to takd
up farming, the Secretary stated that
he considers It important that the
Federal and Sate governments shall
furnish reliable information and
agricultural guidance to such per
sons and promote well considered set
tlement plans.
With reference to the matter of
farm ownership, Mr. Houston said
that he believes the process of ac
quiring ownership of farms should
be encouraged and that tenancy
should be regarded not merely as a
temporary matter but as a step to
ward ownership.
The Secretary's suggestion with
reference to the extension of the
benefits of sanitation and modern
medicine to rural districts is particu
larly timely and, In our opinion, can
not be too strongly ndvcated and pro
moted. The widespread need of such
action has been clearly demonstrated
by the surveys and otherr work in
cident to the sanitation measures tak
en for the protection of the health
of our soldiers In the many training
camps, established thrughout the
country during the war For many
years the Federal Government and
the governments of the different
states and municipalities of the coun
try have devoted much attention and
expended large sums of money for
the protection of the health of the
people of our cities. Certainly those
who live in the rural sections of the
country are equally entitled to such
protection and moreover, since the
has emphasized as never before
war
the tremendously Important part
which the food products of the farm
play In the matter of the welfare of
the world. It Is of universal Interest
and Importance that everything pos
sible be done to provide for the
health, prosperity and general well
being of the food producers of the
country.
FARMERS' ACCOUNT ROOK.
nad difficulties
Many
Many a farmer
with his Income tax return,
others have frequently found It de
sirable to know the actual results of
Many have felt
the year's business,
the need for a system
that would give results with the min
imum amount of labor,
words the demand has been for a
book with the frills removed. A
book of that sort has Just been pub
lished by the Extension Division of
the University of Idaho at
Copies may be secured
County Agents who will also assist
such farmers as desire help.
residing In counties having no
of accounts
In other
Boise.
the
from
Per
sons
county agricultural agent can write
directly to Bolae for their books. The
books were published at a cost of 25
cents each and are furnished at that
price.
STOVES
— —
Our stock of atoves is about all
Wilson
See
They have
gone. We hrfve only 8 left
healers—absolutely the best.
them; ask about them,
given satisfaction for the last SO
Reduced prices.
Fratera
years.
Pence Co.
COMMUNITY STORE IDEA BROUGHT TO U. S.
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What is believed to be the first community store In the United States
of the type which is common In England, has been established In Wash
ington, O. C. It Is owned by the two or three hundred families which pat
ronize It. Goods are sold at as ifear cost as possible and the profits are
paid to each member of the organization in proportion to the amount of
goods he has purchased,
ward Evans, a native of England and manager of the store, is in the cen
ter.
The picture shows the interior of the store. Ed
He was a Congregational minister In Washington for four years before
establishing the community store.
construction of Public School Car
rlculum. Rural School
HIGH SCHOOL NOTES
Besides the teachers of the Jerome
school mentioned before. Mrs V. V.
Bowers wrote on the teachers' exam
ination at Shoshone last week.
The annual conference of super
intendents and principals will be
held at Boise Friday end Saturday.
Some of the topics to be considered
are Americanization Program, Re
Reconstruc
tion and Educational Legislation.
The Jeiomo schools are scheduled
to open on Monday after Christmas,
December 30, provided the Influenza
remains under control. A nurse will
be in attendance to look to the in
specticn of children each day. It is
the day schools and the Sundry
schools that have complied with the
quarintine best but that is of no help
since other public places are open
and crowded.
On account of the shortage of tea
chers. :he federal government has
requested that teachers and school
boards register their needs. No
recommendations, however, will be
made by the government, but teach
ers and school boards are to be
brought In touch with each other.
Some slates rro establishing regular
teachers' agencies ■similar to labor
bureaus, and making* charges just
enough to defray expenses.
at
so
It Is most frequently the student
who is late to bed and last to rise
that is ha:d to get along with at
school. This applies io teachers also.
Besides, so they scy. late houis arc
not conducive to go ;d looks
"Let better ram. better farming,
bettor living bo the aim of rural edu
cation rather tfcna passing r.n eighth
grade examlr.p.'ian or cn erlng some
other school. We must educate for
leisure as well as for work, for living
as for getting a living. The most
dangerous moments are not those of
work but those of licsure."—Teach
ers' Handbook.
The influenza epidemic has made
conditions In regard to school work
very serious Indeed, but there Is no
call for exaggerations that have been
made as to the number of cases and
the severity. The alarmists are the
beat allies of the flu. They are us
ually those who take the least care
of themselves and of the rights of
others.
Many books belonging to and need
ed at school have been in the homes
in the district, some perhaps for
years. Students, patrons and teach
ers should see to it that all books are
returned.
There seems to be a great furor
about the evils of the primary law.
Students of politics have long ago
pointed out the weakness of such
laws ns the primary and the recall
Taking this or that "out of politics"
will also eventually prove a delusion
and a snare The fact remains that
there stilt are many questions of gov
ernment to be studied out. Those
who are so very certain Just what
ought to be done merely show they
have not done much thinking. Pres
on I laws after all. are only stepping
stones to better laws.
The Jerome school has been cited
the only school In Idaho that has
raised the wages or grade teachers In
the increased cost of
ns
proportion t
living.
If, however, low
paid at the time of the wages taken
as the basts the statement Is mlslead
There la a great difference be
an d
vages were
tng.
tween Increase In percentages
the Increase In wages.
TWO CROPS FROM SAME LAND
— fc —
Two crops from the same land in
one season have been harvested by
Mr. Calmer, of Appleton community,
in this county. Two acres of barley
were sown May 1st. On July 14th
the barley was harvested with a re
ported yield of 95 bushels per acre.
July 16lh oals were drilled in the
barley stubble and on October 10th
was cut for forage, yielding nine
tons of good oats hay. This experi
ment will be repeated next year. Mr.
Calmer believes he can grow a grain
and forage crop each year.—Gooding
Leader.
EMPLOYERS ASKED TO
GIVE WORK TO SOLDIERS
Reports from the larger cities are
to the effect that idle labor is already
congesting caused by so many sol
diers and others who have been en
gaged in war work returning to civil
life. The following telegram sent
from Washington to the State Coun
cil of Defence shows the condition the
country is rapidly arriving at.
"Figures received by wire each
week by United States Employment
Service show decrease in demnad for
labor and corresponding Increase in
supply. Speed in cancellation of
waT contracts and demobilization of
army Increasing daily. Many indus
tries hesitate to take on all commit
ments at this time. Building trades
at standstill and probably will remain
so until spring unless every state
community, organization and indi
vidual co-operate to the fullest ex
tent with said service. There is grave
danger of large idle population after
the first of the year. Purchasing
power of country at present time very
great and all possible means must be
used to stimulate best government
plans for improving employment for
all returning soldiers and sailors and
workers in war industries. Can only
be carried through with realizataion
of the situation by the entire coun
I
try. All contractors for war materi
al who expect to lay off workers
should notify United States Employ
All Industries
ment service at once,
in need of help should obtain the
same through the federal service."
SKVERKLY WOUNDED BROTHER
OF JEROME LADY' RETURNS.
The following letter was received
by Mrs, Frank Gransbury from her
brother, who was severely wounded
In action in France and has just re
cently returned to the States where
he is now receiving attention In one
of the military hospitals.
December 17, 1918.
Dear Sister—Just a few lines to
let you know that I am back In the
And take It from me. I am
over In France.
I soon expect to go to u general
hospital, so don't answer until you
hear from me again,
up In the hospital for u couple of
months yet. ns my wound In the nec
is causing me a lot of trouble
wind pipe was cut and my swallow
ing tube also. They had to put a
silver tube In my throat so I could
breathe, and I could not talk for
«bout ten days after I was operated
upon. 1 can't bend my netk bur
and forth yet. One muscle on the
side of my neck was s ot awai an
until that Is well I am almost useless.
That Is why my writing Is so poor.
States.
not the least bit sorry for It was H—
1 may be laid
My
so don't blame me If you wrote
me over In France and I did not ans
I must close now as my muscles
wer.
are getting sore.
Your loving brother, Fred.
IDOHO INDUSTRIAL REVIEW
Jerome billed out 272 carloads of
freight for month of November.
Meridian Co-operative Creamery
has paid out $386,248 to farmers
this year.
Nampa has expended $225,000 on
new homes In 1918.
Idaho school of mines offering 8
weeks miners short course starting
Jan. 1st.
Boise valley farmers buy 43 reg
istered Holsteins for $9000.
Bonners Ferry expects to pave in
spring.
Utility commissions in most states
are meeting utility companies half
way in their efforts to restore their
depleted properles afid build up
their credit to enlist capital.
Welser —Over 100 per cent in
crease in cattle fattened in district
this year.
Lewiston—-Normal school building
to be rebuilt at cost of over $85,000.
Boise poultry show begins Jan. 6.
Sale of bonds by state makes avail
able practically $1,000,000 for roads.
General Smuts of the British army
says as the allies organized the world
for victory so they must organize the
world against famine. The United
States is called upon to lead the
fight against hunger. The 100 beet
sugar factories west of the Missis
sippi will double their production if
they can get beets raised by the
farmers.
Gooding may own water works sys
tem.
Driggs—6,000,0ir0 tons coal in
sight in Teton Basin.
State University to offer ten weeks
creamery course beginning Dec. 30.
One of the business reforms for
Idaho legislators will be the creation
of a county purchasing board to in
duct business in county schools.
Boise—14 acres near here planted
to clover seed teturns $4271.79.
Priest River—With heavy snow
fall timber operators begin activity
here.
Boise—Snake River to be bridged
in Canyon county at cost of $10,285.
Moscow telephone rates will not
be raised now.
Salmon—Work on state highway
in Lemhi county progressing rapidly.
Hailey—Project on Wood River
Valley Irrigation District nearly com
pleted.
Shoshone—Lincoln county hay
growers organize to get market for
crop.
Idaho enacted such a satisfactory
law
compensation
■ workingmen's
that other states have copied it. But
state politicians want it changed to
employ an army of inspectors, adjust
ers, agents and medical examiners.
highway
■Sale of slate
Bois
commission nearly one
million dollars for good roads pur
poses during coming year.
Idaho potato crop to be record
breaker this year.
Caldwell planning crushed rock
roads; first mile to cost $8000.
Acequla—Farmers
cellar here at cost of $3404.
Nampa—Work on $60.000 Mercy
hospital to start soon.
build potato
WHEAT GRADING.
methods of grading
to Lincoln
The proper
wheat will be carried
county farmers during the week of
December 16. One day meetings will
be held In a number of communities
and samples of local wheat will be
graded according to state and federal
Every step will be explained
rules.
to help the Individual farmer under
stand exactly how it should be done.
The meetings will be conducted by j
R. J. Leth. field agronomist of the
University of Idaho Extension Dlvi
. . ,_.
sion The meeting, in Lincoln coun- j
,v are the beginning of a series of ]
such meetings to be held in nearly
Mr. Leth
every-county in the state.
that he has requests for nearly .
such meetings but has been
states
seventy
obliged to reduce that
slightly below fifty.
number to
STOCKMEN'S MEETING
HAS BEEN POSTPONED
_
CodmlUee of the
The Executive
Idaho Cattle & Horse Growers' As
ludefinltely postponed
sociclion have
the dato of holding ihe annual con
ventlon of this organization, which
been held the middle of
account
was to have
January in Boise.
This action was taken on
of the quarantine throughout the
state on Spanish Influenza.
•111 be held at
The convenion
Boise. Idaho, as soon as
will wa ^" l e , n a „ of ,he pa
mera bera will be notl
conditions
dales w
tojpers and the
fled personally by mail.
It pays
Advertise In our columns,
to use them.
MAKING FARMERS OF OUR
SOLDIERS
Much has been said, both in con
gress and out, about a "back to the
land" movement for our returning
soldiers, and the plan might be
worked out easily enough—provided
of course our soldier boys favor the
Idea—were It not for the fact that
the country has no land of any real
value to offer them. It is all very
well to talk in a general way about
the fifteen million acres of desert
lands which the department of Inter
ior claims can be irrigated of the
seventy million acres of sw^imp and
overflowed lands which that depart
ment claims can be drained and made
profitable. There may also be, as
stated by the secretary of the Inter
ior, millions of acres of cut-over
land which can be cleared of stumps,
brush, etc., and made suitable for
agriculture, but these projects are
all matters for the dim and distant
future, whereas the disbandment of
our army and the making of suitable
provisions for the employment of our
returning soldiers is one which must
be dealt with immediately and con
sequently. while the country may bo
justified in incurring the tremendous
expense necessary to make cur two
hundred millions acres or more of
desert, swamp cut-over
suitable for agriculture, the sugges
tion of utilizing any of this arei
(which at present is and for years to
come will necessarily be utterly unin
habitable and useless) for the pur
pose of enticing the men who make
up our present huge armies back to
the land, seems to be hardly worthy
of a second thought.
FOURTH LOAN TOTALS.
— IBs —
Tlie official total of subscriptions
In the Twelfth Federal Reserve Dis
trict for the Fourth Liberty Loan
was $462,250,000 or $3,250,00 more
than announced unofficially a tew
days ago. Allocations to this district
from railroad subscriptions provided
the increase.
Alaska ranks first among the ma
jor divisions of this district with
23 2 per cent which is believed to be
a record for the fourth loan in the
United States.
Following are the official records
of the ten major divisions of this
district:
States and
Territories
Alaska.
Arizona
Wash. . .
Nevada ..
Idaho . .
Oregon ..
Total
Quota Subscriptions
$ 1.369,400 $ 3,180.950
9,626,360
70.189.650
5,996,150
16,890,150
38.362.650
204,030,150
6,231,200
58,215,800
5,033,850
14,549.400
33,708,100
No. Cal.. 186,489,050
19,878,600
7,080,660
Utah ...
Hawaii ..
18,570,800
6,766.050
-1* -
GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURES
Carter Glass, the new secretary of
the treasury. In a telegram to Gov.
James K. Lynch of the 12th Federal
Reserve District announces that ex
penditures of the government during
the fiscal year beginning July 1,
1918, and Including December 16.
1918, exceeded nine billion six hun
dred million dollars and that expend
itures In the month of November
were nearly $2,000,000,000. In the
current month of December up to
and including December 16. expendi
tures exceeded $1,000,000,000. It
is estimated that the total expendi
ures of the fiscal year will be $18,
000 , 000 , 000 .
Secretary Glass favors short ma
turities for the fifth Liberty Loan
and announces that the Treasury De
partaient will continue the sale of
Certificates
^ # ^ manuer ,
-*5- **
LIFTS FOOD RESTRICTIONS.
Regulations on Bread, Meat, Sugar.
Butter and Cheese Rescinded.
Regulations restricting the use of
bread, meat, sugar, butter and cheese
In public eating places which have
been In effect since last October 21
ordered rescinded Sunday by
effective
the food administration,
were
Monday.
This order, it was explained, is a
further step in the replacement of
specific food regulations by a gen
eral appeal for Increased conserva
,Um of all foods to the end that the
United States may meet its pledge to
relieve the distressed civilian popula
the regulr.Mons. the food admln'.sl ra
tion notified public eating place? t
be ready to assist in putting into ef
whlch may
tiens in Europe.
announcing the withdraws of
In
feet any measures
hereafter become necessary through
development In world relief.

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