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Lincoln County times. (Jerome, Idaho) 1911-1919, January 09, 1919, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055184/1919-01-09/ed-1/seq-6/

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RAINBOWJ END
A KOVEt.
AUTHOR.
'TT/E/ßCW TJ3A/A " 'r/fEJPO/LEßS " '/ttAPT CF 7ÏÏ£ Smssrm.
OOPVTU&HT, BY HAKPr.R AND BROTHERS.
Following Jndson's glance, O'Relllv
beheld an emaciated figure lying in the
shade of a nearby guava bush. The
man was clad in filthy rugs, his face
was dirty and overgrown with a
month's heard; a pair of restless eves
stared unl.llnklngly at the brazen sky.
His lips were moving; from them Is
sued a steady patter of words, hut oth
erwlse he showed no sign of life.
"You said he was starving." Johnnie
dismounted and lent Judson a hand
with his task.
"That's what I thought at first, but
he's sick. I suppose it's that Infernal
dungeon fever. We can swing him be
tween our horses, and-"
Judson looked up to discover that
Johnnie was pulsed rigidly, hls mouth
open, his hands halted In midair. The
sick man's voice had risen, and O'Reil
ly, with a peculiar expression of
amazement upon hls face, was strain
Ing his ears to hear what he said.
"Eh? What's the matter?" Judson
Inquired.
For a moment O'Reilly remained
frozen In hls attitude, then without a
word he strode to the sufferer. He bent
forward, staring into the vacant, up
turned face. A cry burst from hls
throat, a cry that was like a sob. and.
kneeling, he gathered the frail, filthy
figure Into his arms.
I
, , . I
me? O Reilly, your frieud your broth- |
T - , F °i 1 8 sake ' r teH me what
they ve done to you ! Look at me. Es
Ifban. Look at me! Look at me! Oh. -
Esteban ! I
Such eagerness, such thankfulness.
such passionate pity were In hls ;
friends hoarse voice that Judson drew i
closer. He noticed that the faintest i
f"?* 0f r~ d ! ck ^ r F d for an ln9taut
n the .Ick hollow
"Esteban !" he cried. "Esteban ! This !
Is O'Rei'ly.
O'Rall-ye ! Don't you know
eyes,
they began to rove again, and the same
iThl'If rr r ; t,c ;; ra 1 menced ' ° Uel1 ;
tears rolled (l 'vnV' 'Vp 'k ls arias •
Î r " h ! \ ! he , im : I
I> ored Esteban to hear and to heed
"Try to bear me ! Try !" There was
fierce agony in the cry. "Where Is
Rosa? . . . Rosa? . . . You're
safe now ; you can tell me. . ,
You're safe with O'Relllv. . . . I |
came hack . . . I came back for you I
and Rosa. . . . Where is she? . . .
1 S she—(lend?"
Other men were assembling now.
The column was ready to move, but
Judson signaled to Colonel Lopez and
made known the identity of the sick
stranger. The colonel came forward
swiftly and laid a hand upon O'Reil
ly's shoulder, saying:
"So! Ton were right, after all. Es
teban Varona didn't die.
have sent us to San Antonio to deliver
him."
God must
"He's sick,
huskily. "Those
what they've done to him." Hls voice
changed.
sick !" O'Reilly said,
Spaniards ! Look
He cried, fiercely: "Well,
I j
ym
-s'
Hr.
^>a-'
. 3 -
S'
* '
II
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I
AVI
J
a
KW»
1
V-' F
J
"Eateban! This Is O'Reilly!"
I'm late again. I'm always just a little
bit too late,
tell me—"
"Wait ! Take hold of yourself. We'll
do all that cun be done to save him.
Now come, we must be going, or all
San Antonio will be upon us."
O'Reilly roused. "Put him In
arms, he ordered. "I'll carry him to
camp myself."
But Lopez shook hls head, saying,
gently :
litter would be better for him. Thank
heaven we have an angel of mercy
awaiting us, and she will know how to
make him well."
When the troop resumed Its retreat
Estebau Varona lay suspended
lie'll die before he cao
my
"It's a long march, and the
upon a
;
swinging neu uetween «.enemy ann
Judson's horses. Although they car
r >«l 1,11,1 ,,s carefully us they could
throughout that long hot Journey, he .
never eeased Ids babbling and never
awoke to his surroundings.
-
CHAPTER XV.
- :
Norlne Take. Char 0 e.
During the next few days O'Reilly
had reason to bless the happy chance
(which had brought Norlne Evans to
Cuba. During the return Journey from i
San Antonio de los Banos he had dis
covered how really 111 Esteban Varona
was. - how weak hls hold upon nfe .
After listening to hls ravings. O'Reilly I
begun to fear that the poor fellow's j
mind v as permanently affected. It was }
an appalling possibility, one to which
he could not reconcile himself. To i
,hInk th,lt somewhere In that fevered !
brain was perhaps locked the truth !
about Rosa's fate. If not the secret of
her whereabouts, and yet to be unable j
The j
to wring an Intelligent answer to a I
single question, was Intolerable,
hours of that ride were among the
longest O'Reilly had ever passed.
But Norlue Evans gave him new i
I
heart. She took complete charge of
the sick man upon hls arrival In camp;
then In her brisk, matter-of-fact way
she directed O'Reilly to go and get
some much-needed rest.
Esteban was j
111, very Ill, she admitted ; there was no j
competent doctor near, and her own
facilities for nursing were primitive !
indeed ; nevertheless, she expressed
confidence that she could cure him.
and reminded O'Reilly that nature has ;
a blessed way of building up a resist- !
ance f 0 environment. As a result of
ber good cheer O'Reilly managed to;
enjoy a ni ght'8 sleep '
He was up at daylight to offer hls
services in earing for Esteban Varona,
but Norlne decllned them _
"Hls fever is down a little and he
has taken some nourishment," she re
ported. "That food you boys risked
vour 8llly Uves for may come in hundy j
after nil."
"I dare say he won't be able to talk !
to me today?" O'Reilly ventured.
"Not today, nor for many days, I'm
afraid." !
.... , .
If f ou don 1 mlnd ' then ' ni ban «
^und and listen to what he says," he
to,dh ^' "'^fully.
" 0r a " ld osa '
He might drop a
"To be sure. So far he's scarcely
mentioned her. I can't understand
much that he says, of course, but Mrs.
Ruiz tells me It's all jumbled and quite
unintelligible."
A
It was a balmy, languid morning
about two weeks after O'Reilly's re
turn to the City Among the Leaves. In
a hammock swung between two trees
Esteban Varona lay. listening to the
admonitions of hls nnrse.
Johnnie O'Reilly had Jnst bade them
both a hearty good morning and now
j
Norlne was saying:
more.
"One hour, no
You had a temperature again
last night, and It came from talking too
much. Remember, It takes me just one
hour to make my rounds, and If
are not through with your tales of
blood and buttle when I get back you'll
have to finish them tomorrow." With.
a nod and a smile she left. j
As Esteban looked after her hls j
white teeth gleamed and hls hollow
face lit up. j
"She brings me new life," he told
O'Reilly. "She Is so strong, so healthy, j
so full of life herself. She is wonder- !
you
ful ! When I first saw her bending over
me T thought I was dreaming. Some
times, even yet. I think she cannot be
real. But she Is, eh?"
"She Is quite substantial." O'Reilly
smiled. "All the sick fellows talk
you do."
Esteban looked up quickly ; hls face
darkened.
eh? I'm not the only one?"
"Well, hardly."
There was a brief pause; then Este
ban shifted hls position and his tone
changed,
any news?"
"Not -yet, but we will hear some be
fore long I'm sure."
"Your faith does as much for me as
this lady's care. But when you go
as
"She— er —nurses
others, ,
;
"Tell me, have you heard
away, when I'm alone, when I begin to
think—"
Don t think too much ; don't permit
faurself to doubt," O'Reilly said, quick
ly. "Take my word for It, Rosa is alive
and we'll find her somewhere, some
how. General Gomez will
word of her.
soon have
That's what I've been
waiting for—that and what you might
have to tell me."
"You know all that I know
everything that has happened to
"I don't know how
now and
me."
„ , „ yoa came to be In
b cell In San Antonio de los Banos, two
hundred miles from the place
killed. That Is still
you were
a mystery."
Tt Is very simple, amigo. Let me
I bad finished telling yon about
the fight at La Joya. I was telling you
how I fainted. Some good people found
me a few hours after I lost conscious
ness. They suppoeed 1 had been
see :
at
ranted Py guerrillas and left for dean.
Finding that 1 still had life In me. they
look me home with them. They were
■Id friends from Mntnnaaa by the
name of Valdes—cultured people who
had tied the city and were hiding la the
munigua like the rest of us."
"Not Valdes, the notary?"
"The very same. Alberto Valdes and
Ids four daughters. Heaven guided
them to me. Alberto was an old man ;
he had hard work to provide food for
his girls. Nevertheless, he refused to
abandon me. Oh. they were faithful,
patient people! You see. I had walked
east instead of west, and now 1 was
miles away from home, and the coun
try between was swarming with Span
iards who were, burning, destroying.
killing. You wouldn't know Matanzas.
O'Reilly. It Is a desert.
"I finally became able.to drag myself
around the hut. Rut I had no means
of sending word to Rosa, and the un
,
e f r J" lnt J " ade nle crazy - My
do,hes had " >tt ^ fro ® m * ! m.v bones
were Just under the skin I must hate
been a shocking sight. Then one day
'here came a fellow traveling east with
messages for Gomez He was one of
L "' H ' Z , ,nen ' and be t ° Id " e D1 ^ at Yt
had to t bo Rubl 3,1,8 w,tb
XIaeeo and that there of
'
t,ur " en tbe Province. He old
:" e ° ' r ' ncs ' t< ,'°' ' '' as f ™ nl h ™
tbat , T ' ear, * ed - , E f* eban Var ° na9
' blu baIlds , ' , ' ,lbed edK0S of hls
hummock and he rolled hls head weak
y .( rom 9 de to side. It was he who
told me about Rosa. He said that Coho
11 Reilly said, soothingly.
"It was a hideous story, a story of
I wonder that I didn't
had ravaged the Yumurl and that my
slstei
rar>e - n ' urd '' r -
S° m ad. " never
doubt > aud i,s « «latter of fact the fel
'°' v was honest enough ; he really be
lieved what he told me. After the
man had finished I felt the desire to
-was gone !"
"There, there ! We know better now,"
ecurred to me to
away from all I had known and
loved, to leave Matanzas for new fields
and « ive wllut was lett ot me t0 tl,c
I was free to enlist, since I
couldn't reach Lopez, and I came to
Join our forces In the Orient.
cause.
"That is how you found me In this
Province. Lopez' man never delivered
these dispatches, for we were taken
crossing the trocha—at least I was
take "- f,,r Pablo was killed. They'd
,lave niade an end of me, too. I dure
Sll * v * 0 °^7 I was so weak. It seems a
century since that night. My memory
d° esn 't serve me very well from that
P°1 Q L f° r they jailed me, and I grew
worse. I was out of my head a good
deal.'* •
The two men fell silent for a while,
Esteban lay with closed eyes, exhaust
ed. O'Reilly gave himself up to frown
tlmught. Hls thoughts were no,
P'ensant ; he eould not. for the life of
hUu - > a Rosa's safety so ini
illicitly as he hud led Esteban to sup
pose ; hls efforts to cheer the other
!lad s »pped hls own supply of hope
Hc was 8 |ad when - N ' orln e Evans' re-,
turn P®t an end to hls speculations.
"Have you harrowed this poor man's
feelings sufficiently for once?" she In
quired of O'Reilly.
"I have. I'll agree to talk about
nothing unpleasant hereafter."
Esteban turned to hls nurse. "There
Is something I want to tell you both."
"Wait until tomorrow," Norlne ad
vised.
leaving him a prey to black misgivings.
But he persisted: "No! I must tell
It now. First, however, did either of
you discover an old coin In any of my
pockets—an old Spanish doubloon?" '
"That doubloon again !" Norlne lift
ed her hands protCstlngly, and east
meaning look at O'Reilly. "You talked
about nothing else for a whole week.
Let me feel your pulse."
Esteban surrendered hls hand with
suspicious readiness.
"You were flat broke when
we got
yon," O'Reilly declared.
"Probably. I seem to remember that
somebody stole it."
"Doubloons! Pieces of eight! Gold
HD guineas!" exclaimed Norlne. "Why
tbo8e are pirate coins ! They remind
m ® ot Treaf, ure Island ; of Long John
®*' Ter and hls wooden leg; of Ben
Gaaa and all the rest."
„ ® stt 'h an smiled uncomprchendlngly.
Tes? Well, this has to do with treas
ure of the Varonaa. My father burled
He was very rich, yon know, and
It.
he was afraid of the Spaniards. O'Reil
ly knows the story."
Johnnie
"Sure !
Esteban raised himself to hls elbow.
"You think It's a myth, a Joke. Well,
JJ n0t ' 1 know where It 's- I found
assented with
I know all about It."
a grunt.
i
Norlne gasped; Johnnie spoke sooth
Ingly;
"Don't get excited, old
talked too much today."
"Ha !" Esteban fell back
pillow. "I haven't any fever,
sane as ever I was. r
exists, and that doubloon
clue to its whereabouts. Don Esteban,
my father, was cunning; he could hide
things better than a magpie. ;
malned for me to discover hls trick "
"He Is raving." O'Reilly declared,
«Ith a sharp stare at hls friend.
man ; you've
upon hls
I'm as
That treasure
gave me the
It re
The girl turned loyally to her pa
tient. "I'll believe you, Mr. Varona. I
always believe everything about hurled
treasure. The bigger the treasure the
more implicitly I believe In It. I sim
ply adore pirates and such things - If I
«ere a man I'd be one. Do you know,
I ve always been tempted to bury my
money and then go look for IL"
'There la no doubt that my father
had a great deal of money at one time "
Esteban began: "he was the richest
man In the richest city of Cuba
O'Reilly shook hls head
and braced hls back
trunk; there
When Esteban
dubiously
against a tree
was a look of mild dlsnn
0,1 hl " f8ce a " h " listened to
he familiar story of Don Esteban an(1
the slave, Sebastian,
oho nnisnea, Nonne are"' -
breath.
"Oh ! That lays over any story I
ever heard. To think that the deeds
and the Jewels and everything are In
the well at this minute I Suppose some
body finds it ?" Norlne was aghast at
the thought.
"Not much chance of that. The i
treasure has lain there for a- genera
tion. and the story Itself Is almost for
gotten." Esteban turned triumphantly
to O'Reilly, saying, "Now, then, do you
think I'm so crazy?"
O'Reilly didn't have It In his heart to
say exactly what he really thought.
What he more than half suspected was
that some favored fancy had formed
lodgment In Esteban's brain.
"It's an interesting theory." he ad
mitted. "Anyhow, there Is no danger
of the treasure being uncovered very
soon. Cueto had a good look and made
himself ridiculous. You'll have ample
chance to do likewise when the war Is
over."
"You must help me find It," said
Esteban. "We shall id! share the for
tune equally, you two, Rosa and I."
"Wet Why should we share In It?"
Norlue asked.
"1 owe It to you. Didn't O'Reilly
rescue me from a dungeon? Haven't
you nursed me back to health? Don't
I owe my life to you both?"
"Nonsense! I, for one. sha'n't take
a dollar of It."
"Oh. but you must. I Insist. Nurs
lag is a poorly paid profession.
Wouldn't you like to be rich?"
"Profession ! Poorly paid?" Norlne
sputtered, angrily. "As If I'd take
pay !"
"As If I would accept a great service
and forget It, like some miserable beg
gar !" Esteban replie*! stiffly.
O'Reilly laughed out. "Don't let's
quarrel over the spoil until we get It,"
said he. "That's the way with all'
treasure-hunters. They Invariably fall
out and go to fighting. To avoid blood
shed, I'll agree to sell my Interest
cheap, for cash. My share of the fa
mous Varuna fortune going for a dol
lar !"
"There t He doesn't believe a word
of It," Esteban said.
Norlne gave an Impatient shrug,
"Some people wouldn't believe they
were alive unless they saw their breath
on a looking-glass. Goodness ! How I
hate a sneering skeptic, a wet blanket."
O'Reilly rose with one arm shielding
his face. "In the Interest of friend
ship, I withdraw. A curse on these
burled treasures, anyhow. We shall
yet come to blows."
As he walked away he heard Norlue
say: "Don't pay any attention to him.
Ve'll go and dig It up ourselves, and
ve won't wait until the war Is over."
\n hour later Esteban and his
l bud their heads together.
îttill talking of golden Ingots and
'com the Caribbean the size of
'.hen they looked up to
I
nurse .
They
see
O'Reilly running toward them. He was
visibly excited ; he
at them. He was punting when he ar
rived.
"News !
aved and shouted
From Matanzas!" he cried.
"Gomez' man has arrived."
Esteban struggled to rise, but No
rlne restrained him. "Rosa? What
does he say? Quick!"
"Good news ! She left the Pan de
Matanzas with the two negroes,
went Into the dty before Coho's mid."
Esteban collapsed limply. He closed
hls eyes, hls face was very white. He
crossed himself weakly.
"The letter Is definite. It seems they
were starving. They obeyed Weyler's
bando. They're In Matanzas now."
"Do you hear, Esteban?" I
shook her patient by the shoulder, j
"She's alive. Oh. can't yon see that It !
always pays to believe the best7"
"Alive! Safe!" Esteban whispered.
Hls eyes, when he opened them,
swimming; he clutched Norlne's hand |
rightly: his other hand he extended to
O'Reilly,
tanzns !
She
Norlne l
were
"A reconcentrndo !
Well, that's good.
In Ma
We have
friends ther
they'll not let
This makes a new man of me. !
See ! I'm strong again. I'll go to her."
"Ton'll go?"
Evans.
ber
starve.
quickly cried Miss
"You'll go! You're not strong
It would be suicide.
enough.
, . You,
with a price upon your head I Every
body knows you there,
virtually a walled city,
ness, too—yellow fever, typhus—"
"Exactly. And hunger, also,
pose no one has taken Rosa In? Those
concentration camps aren't nice places
for a girl."
"But wait ! I have friends In Wash
Matanzas Is
There's slck
I snp
ington. They're Influential. T'ey will
able the American consul to look after
her.
Anyhow, you mustn't think ot re
urnlng to Matanzas,'' Norlne faltered;
1 r vo!re «mnght unexpectedly and she
timed her face
O'Reilly nodded shortly,
ick man." he agreed. "There's
away.
"You're a
no need
for both of us to go."
Estehan looked up.
"I leave at
given me a commission
tancourt, and I'll he
hour.
"Then you—"
The Old Man ha«
j to General Ilé
on my way In an
once.
The moon Is
• ross the trocha before—"
'That troehn 1"
hls elbow again.
young; I must
Esteban was
iHPB "Be careful there.
O Reilly. They keep „ «harp lookout
and It's guarded with barbed wire. Be
sure you cut every strand. Yes, and
muffle your horse's hoofs, too. In eross
Ing the railroad track. That's how
were detected. Pablo's horse
a rail, and they fired at the sound!
fell at the first volley, riddled
know that trocha!"
(To lie Continued.!
up on
wo
«truck
He
Oh. I
to
Auto Robes at ,j a ».
Buy your window
North Side Pharmacy,
Hummers,
glass at the
We handle a
complete stock.
All kinds ot harness repairing dona
bi a workman like manner by James
® un >mers, me pioneer harness man. j
That Dark-haired\
Chap from
Virginia
small chew of Gravely
holds its good taste.
That's why it lasts
much longer than a big
chew of ordinary plug.
It goto further — tkat'i why you
tan ft tka fad tattt of tki, dot,
•/ tobacco witkont taira
says that down South
the best people won't
chew anything but Real
Gravely. They know
how it's made— the
Gravely way. It costs
nothing extra to chew
this class of plug. A
so
cost.
PEYTON BRAND
Real Gravely Chewing PW
10 $ a pouch-a nd worth it »
P-q-CRAVELY TOBACCO CO . DANVILLE. VaT
r*'
If
>Ti
THE TIME FOR SAVING AND GETTING
AHEAD IN THE GAME OF LIFE IS NOW.
With a Bank Account started and steadily
growing you will experience a pleasure of
accomplishment in saving that comes front
naught else.
THE BEST WAY IS TO COME IN AND
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DELAY ON ACCOUNT OF THE AMOUNT
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DON'T
STRENGTH • ACCOMMODATION • 5|WlCC
O* OL.KÜME o.cMacWAjfses. Pun
Jo*a Tmoma», net Pats
eo Kitt.. CASH! ta
P W WnuAHSaa, Atir C'l
p
si as
C }
r
I I I I I ,
+++++++++++++
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