OCR Interpretation


Lincoln County times. (Jerome, Idaho) 1911-1919, February 13, 1919, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055184/1919-02-13/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

tntt
iw
8 PAOfil
8 PAGEN
I
l l
%
6f tri« North Side Tract.
Weekly Newspaper Devoted to the Interests of
bottler
the
VOL. 8.
82.00 PER YEAR
NO. 52.
JEROME, IDAHO. KERR VARY
:i. lino.
CJO\ . HA VIS SIONS JEROME
COUNTY DIM,
— R» —
New County Mnkis
In the Slate
SATURDAY i
''orty-Thlnl One
Although a determined opposition j
was brought to bear by citizens of the
Uuperl section Governor l). W. Davis I
slgned the Jerome county hill Satur-1
day afternoon at 4:SO, creating Ida
ho's 43rd coiiniy from portions of
Gooding, Lincoln and Minidoka.
Tremendous pressure to get him to
veto the bill was brought on the gov
ernor by citizens i n Minidoka
ty, and early Saturday afternoon a
large delegation from Rupert, the
county seat, headed by E. U. Dum
pier an attorney, called to reiterate
their pleas that the bill be not slgn
coun
ed.
They olTeri>d lo hold an election
Monday at their expense in order to
give the governor the true sentiment
of the citizens of the western portion
of Minidoka who are included in the
new county, and staled that If the
sentiment was found lo be In favor
of the division they would cease op
position.
F'orced to Take Action
Governor Davis replied that lie
would either have to veto ihe hill or
sign it Saturday, having had II five
days, and that he had made ii p hfs
mind to support the vote of the leg
islature In creating the county. He
stated, however, that If a hill were In
troduced giving the citizens in the
county the privilege of voting on th«»
matter he would also sign that bill If
It passed.
Jerome will be ihe county seat of
the new county. Under provisions of
the bill Governor Davis must appoint
county officials within ten «lays, who
will serve until ihe next' election.
At a meeting of the Republicans in
the newly formed county of Jerome
the following Candida tea were agreed
upon and the slate forwarded lo Gov
ernor Davis for his approval ami ap
pointment:
Clerk of the district court. Oliver
Hill; county attorney, A B. Barclay;
treasurer. I. D. Ward; assessor. W.
N. Hardwick: probate Judge. L. L
Badgley; superintendent of
Mrs Kearney; commissioners, A An
derson, A. W. Atwood. O Rolcc
By the terms of the bill the new
Ofttcers will have sixty days to quallf)
for office after their appointment.
chools.
Nothing definite lias been done it
regard to a court house, that being
' matter for the newly appointed
Several plans have
coni missloners
been suggested, none of which could
he carried out at once, will« h will
for Hie present vaca"t
that
mean
rooms will have to be secured In dlff
erent parts of Ihe town to accommo
date the various county offices until
such a time as a court house can be
procured.
Jerome enters the, sisterhood ot
counties as a fifth class county an
while the salaries are small and In
many Instances will hardly pay Ihe
new officers to devote all thetr time
to the office, they feel that a great
vork Is necessary In th
amount of
organization of the ne« county and
a matter In which all must do t h "1
part to make Jerome county the* best,
and are therefore
giv"
vllling to
lo tlit*
their time and energy
county.
Wa
PRIVATE THUS, I. IORDAN. RE
PORTED MISSING. IS HA EE
Lust Monday \lr .1 1. Jordan re
ceived a letter under «late of Febru
ary 4th from Ihe captain of the
sistant adjutant staling that ln IL
muster roll call
Thomas f. Jordan was
missing. We are glad to report th -«
the young man is not missing, as his
parents received a letter from bin
last week under dale of January 51 h.
release I
as
f October 8 Pro it"
reported a
stating that he hud been
from the hospital and was again "a
Joying good health,
he was located some sixty miles from
At Hint Him
Paris and slated that he hoped to
soon he nble to return to Ihe stale.
Just how this information was dc
layed In reaching the parents Is one
of those things that can not he <-\
where deaths
plained, the same as
were reported by Hie depiiiimeii-t a «
Inter foilncl to lie erroneous.
There was a period of about ' >' "
months at about Hie time the aruils
Hoe was signed that Tom was not
heard from and ll Is presume 1
ho was rushed to a hospital nl Hit'
time, his company officers not helm
notified, hence he was reported miss
bet
Ing
8UEGP QUARANTINE HERE
No sheep will be
Lincoln county Is ono of twenty
three counties In the slate that have
been placed under quarantine for
sheep scabbles by the state livestock
sanitary board.
/
permitted to be moved from them
unless accompanied by an inspection
« : rllflc.ile Issued by a stale or fed
eral Inspector.
Counties quarantined are Bear
Lake, Franklin, Oneida, Cassia, Twin
Lincoln, Minidoka,
j Falls. Gooding,
Power, Bannock, Bonneville, Blng
I Blaine, Camas, Butte, Jeffer
Hon - Madison, Teton, Owyhee, Kl
more, Custer, Lemhi and Ada. Ac
Hon Is taken In accordance with Sec
tion J168 of hte revised codes of
Idaho,
The quarantine order states that
the owner or caretaker of sheep lo
cated In the quarantined area shall
not ship, haul, drive or in any other
manner move any sheep from the
quarantine area or from the premis
es therein unless accompanied by an
inspection certificate issued by a
state or federal Inspector covering
the sheep to be moved, iior shall any
transportation company accept for
shipment sheep in or from the quar
antined area unless the shipper first
delivers unto said transportation
company the original permit or cer
tificate covering said sheep.
It Is also ordered by the board that
all sheep found lo be infected or ex
posed in any manner must be dip
ped according to the regulations of
the bureau of animal Industry and
under the supervision of state or fed
eral inspectors.
•- RH Rtl
TWIN FALLS JURY FREES
MAN CHARGED WITH ASSAULT
A Jury In district court Friday ev
ening at Twin Falls declared Frank
Dolan, ditch-rider for the Salmon
river canal company, not guilty of
an alleged assault with a deadly
weapon October 26. 1918, upon Fred
W. Berger, Nonpartisan candidate on
Ihe Democratic ticket for state repre
sentative last fall. The verdict was
returned after three and one-half
hours of deliberation. In testimony
for the prosecution Berger had stat
ed that he had been • provoked by
epithets applied to him by Dolan to
thrust with a pitchfork at Dolan, who
was sealed In an automobile, before
Delon had drawn a revolver and shot
him In the abdomen. The trouble
arose over a dispute over terms of a
lease on land owned by Berger and
held by Dolan.
THE SEATTLE IDEA
The strike at Seattle is as dis
quieting as it Is astounding. Union
labor has stood rfrraly for the right
of collective bargaining. Now a sec
tion of union labor, having entered
Into a certain bargain to work In
the shipyards at a certain wage, for
a certain time, repudiates its own
contract with the shipyards and the
government.
It Is an announcement that union
labor. In making a contract, cannot
be compelled, by moral power or by
It is a declara
law, to carry It out.
Hon that union labor reserves the
privilege and right, when it makes a
bargain, to withdraw from It at will.
Quite clearly If labor generally
yields to the demands of radicalism.
It Is an end of unionism—the union
ism which has made great gains dur
ing the past several years and which
bas fourni acceptance of Its princi
pes, or many of them, by employers
and public.'
It |r- a grave crisis for tho pnbRc
itself.
It is a grave criais for lulmr
Shull ihe Seattle tall of radicalism
and revolution ruin the great animal
of labor throughout the nation?
UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO MAY
Cl «OSE ONE WEEK EARLIER
at the
The present college year
Moscow, may
University nf Idaho,
close Saturday. June 14. Instead rf
previously scheduled.
June 21. as
This Is the recommendation which
the University faculty voted to sub
mit to the Slate Board of Education.
Examinations will he held during Hie
Commencement
week of June 9-14.
will be on June 11
It 1s especially desirable
college earlier than June 21. If sum
•hoo! Is held at the University.
whether
to clos'
mor sc
It Is not definitely known
there will be u summer session her >,
legislature has
Cl'l
Is. I,
until after tin
■ -•l.-reil It. hut in case there
fairly onrlv dato for It« opening 1«
The opening of the next college
vear has been scheduled for Septem
her 15 and 16 with Monday and,
Tuesday devoted to registration Thtf
Is no Innovation, hut merely a retu-n
Hie college schedule pursued be
desired.
!
fore the war.
All kinds or Harness repairing don»
workman Ilk» manner hv James
man
We have a quantity of old newapa
pers for sale at this offica.
tu n
Summers fine pioneer hirne«*
I
I
I
!
START HIM RIGHT
À
ll
i 1 ' l
I / ;
ft
I.
I '
dt.i
■> ■ S'.,
ttl Ju
s m 'SB
■ .
&■
V-,I
r t y
t t
•H
IS.
«6
V
hsBmx.
I V *.
VAjli
'
?
• ,
■>
.
If
US?
D
V.'
•SA
#'=■' G,
? ■
.■îtv
y.
»
V ■ I
•X. 'V
MUST HAYE 1»1U LICENSE
TO RUN MOTOR CARS
— ** —
Those who use last year's number
are subject to prosecution.
When machine Is five years only
half of former fee Is charged for p"r
mit lo operate.
Motor vehicle license fees for tlie
year 1919 were due on January 1st
automo
and persons who operate
biles, motorcycles dr motor trucks
under 1918 licenser are subject to
prosecutton.
Through the office of the county
motor vehicle licenses may
assessor,
he procured and fees paid.
Following is a summary of the
Idaho motor vehicle laws;
License fee on all automobiles in
Idaho is due and payable on and af
ter ihe flrr.t of January of each year.
All automobile owners should ap
ply for and have their license ready
by the lime the roads are in shape
for traffic.
No motor vehicle, except those be
longing to Ihe government, state
county or city, shall be operated
upon llie public highway until such
motor vehicle is provided with the
distinctive number plate issued by
the secretary of the state highway]
commission.
The owner of a motor vehicle may.
after purchasing the same from a j
dealer, operate it upon the public
highway using the dealer's number
plate for a period of fifteen days ;
from the date of taking possession,
provided that application shall have^
made for license before such
been
motor vehicle is used upon the public
highway.
Sec, 14.
Session Laws.
Chap. 52, of the 1917 I
Page 118. Is us fol-j
loW8 .
"If any person, co-partnership or
corporation owning a motor vehicle i
motorcycle who is subject to a;
license tax therefore under the pro-[ing
visions of this act. fails, neglects or
refuses to apply for the same and
pay for «„id license tax within the
lime required by this act. It shall
be the duty of the county assessor
of the county In which such motor]
r he found
or
vehicle or motorcycle may
rlthoul the necessity for previous
demand for the payment thereof, to
collect said license fee by the selz
d sale of stich motor vehicle
v
ure an
motorcycle In the same manner
ns is or shall be provided by law for
the seizure and sale of personal pro
perly In default of Hbe payment of
taxes thereon."
or
MAKES RECORD WITH COWS
_ wj
Mariait has provided The
showing what
i' B.
-,
wlth figures
he done with cows in this court*
The figures show that R.
leader
ran
U
try.
Thorp of Bliss with seventeen Jersey
, valued at *1.190, produced ro
of *2.910 during 1918 at
of *1.4 11. leaving Mr, Thorp lh<
cows
turns
cost
nice balance of *1.399. or *72 per
Following are the figures:
head.
Rm-elpts
Milk, 80.0011 pounds and Imiter
fat. 4.000 pounds, the cash receipts
from which were »2.040. Skim milk.
»200; twelve heifers «old »4ML ««
male calves sold. *40. milk and
ter used tu the home. »5 .
Total.
»2,810,
Expenditures
Interest on money
cows. »119; feed and pasture. »716;
Invested
and feed for bull, $75.
411,—Gooding Leader.
SOUTHERN IDAHO FARMERS
MENACED BY ALFALFA WEEVIL
— 8 ..
Boise—In the year 1913 alfalfa
weevil operated in the state In nine
counties, including Bear Lake,
Franklin, Oneida, Cassia. Bannock,
Power. Bingham, Madison and Pay
ette.
It appeared, however, only
{
the extreme southern boundaries o
these counties, according to the sec
retaries of the Idaho state seed show
and the Idaho state farm bureau.
who have asked L. W. Fluharty. di
rector ot agricultural extension of
the state of Idaho, to-call the atten
tion of the agricultural committee of
the legislature to the necessity fc.r
jsuch legislation and appropriation as
) may be necessary to effectively an i
| immediately suppress and wherever
alfalfa
practicable stamp out the
weevil from the state.
"Alfalfa is the most valuable farm
crop In the state of Idaho," accord
ing to the resolution of the two or
ganizalioiis. "and in 1918 its value
approximated three-fourths of *18,
000.000, the value of the crop In
the year of 1917, which amount was
, , . , ,
approxlmately three-fourths of the I
I
I
I
[total value of the eight most valua
hie farm crops for the same year in
the state." The resolution then con
linues as follows:
"The establishment of the alfalfa
weevil in the state will Jeopardize
nearly every branch of agriculture
and nearly every farm crop directly
or indirectly on account of the quar-1
antlne regulations which are ami j
which may be imposed by neighbor-1
]ing states and outside market affect-;
ing products exported from districts',^
Infected by alfalfa weevil.
"It seems entirely within probabil-;
Uy that within the next three rt) five
[years from Ihe present date the ab
falfa will become evenly distributed
throughout the whole alfalfa Krow
area of southern Idaho.
' "Alfalfa weevil, which was first
discovered in a small field of alfalfa
near Salt Lake, Utah, in 1904. 'lur-j
ing the following ten years spread
from this field over a territory *00
miles in diameter, and in the year
1916 involved a loss of one-half the
annual yield of alfalfa in that s,a,p -
s
GOODING COLLEGE NOTES
Since the enrollment at
Gooding
Gooding College has more than doub
led since December 30, student ac
have taken
life.
on a new
tivilies
The glee club ami the public speak
ing classes are both preparing pro
grams that will he given
The basket hall hoys have organized
with Frank Bennett as captain and
already being made
!
I
arrangements are
for a series of games and contests
with a number of outside schools
Application has also been made for
entrance Into the Southern Idaho
Conference which already includes
the Idaho Technical Institute at Pm-
niello, the College of Idaho a. Cab*
wc.i and the State Norma, at A
bion.
. )KNSK \ CREAMERY
Pr nor
PLEADS
LAW
GUILTY TO VIOLATING
—fc —
Thruogh Its attorney, former Gov
James H. Hawley, the Jensen
company pleade.l guilty In
Creamery
United States district court to tech
nical violation ot the Sherman anti
mi.. . .»
S .
was
> closed.
In January,
was filed in the United Slates district
court at Boise against llie Jensen
Creamery company and other corpor
1917, an indictment
allons and 11 Individual defendants;
all of whom were engaged In the
creamery business, charging violation
of I lie Sherman act.
The matter ha» been pending Hlnce
hut last December was set for trial
on February 17, 1919.
The
Jensen
Creamery
company
eased lo do business some time be
fore the indictment,
c
the
Mutual

'reamery having purchased its hold
lugs.
— fcl It3
HIGHEST FARM WAGES IN HALF
CENTURY WERE PAID IN 1918
— *C
Wages for farm labor In the Unit-1
ed States have more than doubled
since 19 02 and have Increased 4 3 to
64 per cent for the different classes
of hirings since 19i6, or 53 per cent
for farm labor in general,
comparisons are warranted by the
results of a recent investigation made
- ,, ,, .
by the Bureau of Crop Estimates,
... r._. . . ..
United States Department of Agri
culture
For 1918 the wage rate per month
with board was *34.92, without board
„«-. . . . ...
*4 «.Hi; per day in harvest with
«o ce „.„V, v j
board *2.65, without board *3.22;
, . . . ... ,
per day out of harvest with board
These
... . , , ...
*2.D «. without board *2.63. These
, , IT , . _
are averages for the United States.
The highest rates were in the far
west, and next below are those of ;
the west and north central states.
The wage rates of the South Atlan
tic states were lowest and were a
little below those of the South Cen
irai slates, as state-group averages
A record of 53 years of farm wages '
places 1918 at the top, and far above
ihe highest rates of the half oenturv
Wage earnings mea
before 1916.
sured by purchasing power may war
rant a different statement.
While the wages of farm labor
have greatly Increased in only two
years and have doubled in 16 years.
it is interesting to observe that from
he time of low-water mark in farm
wages. 25 years ago in the great R-|
dustrial depression of
the rates have increased from 165
to 229 per cent for the different
1893-1897
classes of hirings.
Day wages on farms Increased in
;
greater degree than month wages did
during the last two years, and this
s true for the last 16 vears except^""'
for month wages with board. Wages
bv the dav for work outside of har
'
vest have advanced more i
than for harvest work. Apparently
jthe procurement of month labor is
less of a problem to the farmer than
the finding of day labor, especially
for work outside of harvest.
strongly
;
««1» WHEAT FRIGE TO STAND
while the farmer would be paid
,| )e jo.26 government guarantee for
wheat
, he
bp solrt to tlle consumer at a
heat crop, the
!prb e to be dictated by the law of
s , |pp)y nt ,d demand under legislation
. ipproved last Thursday night by the
house agriculture committee. The
KOVPrnmPnt would lose the differ
(>noc be)we en the purchase and sale
prices. •
vvitb tbp government given ahso
Ut|p rontrol nf tl ,e wheat market in
tbe rnitP d Stales, members of the
sab , „ would he difficult
ro rteter mlne what would he the
pr , rp jf )bf . u8ua j law of supply and
demand were in operation, but they
thought it
vould be based largely
the world market price. Some wit
on
s who have testified at hearings
before Hie committee have predicted
« world price of $1 25 a bushel.
May Lose $1 a Bushel
On the basis of such a price the
would stand a loss of
bushel, but committee
govern ment
about *1 a
members would not venture a pre
l;>iv
vhat the total loss
diction as to
might be as forecasts of the
i depend upon many factors. The
croi
rop is
estimated now at about 1 .
i))M) bu8 i, ets .
^ b(U approV(M by ,t le commit
f>i|> ^ „ ubstilutl Mtr , h »t presented
^ |h) r<l(M ai1mtnif , lra Hon and «le
^ <)f aKrb . u , ture . It gives
sWt ,„ «lis. rctlonary powers
,, , ,, r „s, a. agency for
the wheat -rop or ;
new one and appropnai. s * , •
ftOti,000 as a revolving fund to cm
« m the guarantee.
...
'■>'
th.
meredal agency
grain corporation will "•
ab lc Hie government to
of the crop.
Mem
to
>•-time
.. .,r II» ».
meat following peace.
December 31, 1920.
neco8s #, r>
taka
>n
the measure
•rlod of adjust
and not later
1
than
Will Re Seen in "Toys of Fate" Next
•Monday and Tuesday
THE GREAT NAZIMOVA
COMING TO RIAI/TO THEATER
Nazlmova was born In the Russian
Crimea, in a little town on the shores
of the black
At the early age
of twelve she began her artistic
sea.
ca
reer in the study of music.
Becom
ing proficient on the violin she mad*
her debut as a concert player, but
soon left the musical for the dra
rnatic stage,
She studied under the
great director Slanlslawsky, at the
Artistic theatre In
Moscow, and
eventually played, as leading woman
1,1 a stock company, In more than
two hundred parts.
Always restless and ambitious she
finally came to America where she
I
: ......
i actress was establlahed.
... , _ , .
Nazlraova s first screen classic wax
.. , .
the P* <,ture Revelation, which wax
f 0 "'" at , the R ' aIt ° theatre here
| Je ? m , # U
ond picture, 'Toys of Fate,' will bs
, ... . '
; shown next Monday and Tuesday,
,, , .... , ' . „ .. .
i February lith and 18th. Her third
, . , _ „ , . . .
mastered the Engllan tongue and fin
ally produced a series of plays by
Ishen
In these productions she soon
drew the attention of the dramatic
world to her unusual ability and be
fore long her fame as an emotional
, ... , . „
the Rialto for the middle of March,
NEW PRIMARY LAW
We ere indebted to Senator Hoias
'or a copy of Senate Bill No. 68, by
Nelson and Nash, relating to tha
omination and election of candi
dates for public and political office«.
The hlil, if it becomes a law, will
" ot disturb the fundamental prlncl
*' ,e of P°P ular action but will stm
1 .Ilf y the procedure and, it is believ
t,on of <' a " d ' da te« and in less ex
9 en|!< '
proval of ^publicans and democrats
alike, it being recognized, they de
ed, result in more satisfactory selec
The new measure has general ap
c,are - ,hat ,here is a Popular feeling
, * lal , * le P res ent primary is unwelldy
•nd totally unsatisfactory end that
the public demands a change.
The proposed law provides for
county primaries at which county
tickets will be named by the various
;
parties. At the same time delegates
bp b r * he var ' ow ' p ' r -
" es - At ,he 8ame t,me de,e *ates wl«
be named to county conventions of
,be P a f ,ies tbat will name delegates
to the state conventions.
Each party acts Independently and
has it own organization, and a par
ty is designated as an organization
having cast at the preceding election
for one fo its candidates 10 per cent
of the entire vote cast for all the
candidates for that particular office.
; An affiliation of voters to the mm
her of 5 per cent of the total vote
cast at the preceding general elec
lion also gives party standing.
Independent tickets may be named
by petition. 3000 bona fide voters
being required for state or federal
positions. 900 for district. 300 for
county and 30 for precinct,
Provisions are being made for pay
ing actual expenses of delegates to
*t a » e convention This provision Is
made so no delegate need be under
obligations to any interest or candt
date an dso that no desirable man
can refuse to go as a delegate De
cause ot his inability to pay the ex
penses
ventiop of his party.
— wi
of the trip to the state con
TWIN FALLS WEST
END PROJECT REVIVED
_ 8» _
Meredith interests
to revive the lllstar
End project,
contract with
of Des
The
Moines propose
red Twin Falls-West
having entered into a
the state land board providing for
the reclamation of 8.060 acres of
land under
contract Is made with Idaho Farm
v of which E. T
Developern tncompan;
Meredith is the president,
iract calls for the delivery of two
acre-feet of water between April 16
The con
, veir
and September 15 of each V<
The -ire of the PfoJ«t to
undertaken is much su 1
that originally y ....
Meredith Plans -
secured = .
• (Rfflcullies prevented
u ( . omrletloH 0 f the reclamation
than
wax
the ■
works although
tÄTÄ
work
considerable
who lost out
to b«
their losses
Cedar Creek is the source
to supply w-atem
dcpeiid
for th*
ed upou
West-End project
Usslfled wan tad».
Read the Time* c

xml | txt