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Payette enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho) 1909-1935, October 17, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055199/1918-10-17/ed-1/seq-2/

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Our Flag
Vnyette Enterprise
.ttueO EVERY THURSDAY.
WILL WELLS, Owner.
WILL WELL 8 .
Editor and Manager
ftuieren second-class matter Augr
21. 1V07, at tho postoffice at
«U*. Ida be
of March 8 . 1879
Pay
under the Act of Congres*
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1918
REPUBLICAN TICKET
Congressional and State Candidates.
U. S. Senator, short term,
F. IR. Gooding.
U. S. 'Senator, full term,
W. E. Borah !
Representative in Congress
Burton L. French
Governor
D. W. Davis
Lieutenant Governor
C. ,C. Moore
Secretary of State
TV- W. Van Connon
fltate Auditor
Edward G. Gallot
State Treasurer
John W. Eagleson
Attorney General
Roy L. Black
Supt. of Public Instruction
Ethel E. Redfield
Inspector of Mines
Robert N. Bell
Republican Legislative and County
Candidates for Payette County.
State Senator
Ross Mason
.State Representative
i
Emma F. A. Drake
County Commissioner, 1st Diet.
J. A. White
County Commissioner, 2nd Dist. !
J. M. Davis
County Commissioner, 3rd Dist.
A. C. Cogswell
Clerk of District Court j
H. G. Gardner
Sheriff 'I
John T. Jeffries
Treasurer
Ruth R. Shaw
Probate Judge
Calvin Keller
Supt. Public Instruction
Anna Johnson
Assessor
D. B. Coats
Coroner
H. F. Knight
County Surveyor
C. P. Lattig
Prosecuting Attorney
It. E. Haynes
r
i
Kaiser Wilhelm in his recent gas
sttack at Eseen said that "the Ger
man people willl attain a happy and
free future." That's all right, but he
will not be there.
Spanish influenza is a dangerous,
serious malady, to be avoided if at
but think how much
all possible,
worse it would he if they had nam
ed it "Germaai influenza."
This is the time of the year when
the housewife Is looking for little
pickling onions. It might be well to
lgam how to raise them—its easy.
Just plant any ordinary onion seed,
and whPn they get to the desired
size, pull them.
"Eat
Food Administration say«;
more fish; the ocean is full of them.'
Ye«, the ocean i* full of them
right, and that's just the trouble. If
back yard was full of them we
our
would he tickled to eat fi&h
day, but it 1 b hard for the ordinary
to get off cm an afternoon
every
person
and go out into the ocean after them
and they have a stubborn
way c
staying there.
/
. ... _. _, „
Kaiter doubtless experienced a
, _ . ,_
great thrill of pride and joy when.,
B j n. v „ „
hi Dressed the button that set In
v , ,
motion the mighty Teuton war ma
... „„„
dLlnc that he had ^en so carefuRy
preparing, oiling and tuning up for
many years previous y ; now he
must experience a suffocating, appall
ing fear and dread as the realiza
tion is forced on him that he has
started something he can't «top, some
thing that to bound to go on until
he ajid his despicable partners
crime and barbarity are put in r
.position where they can never again
monkey with such dangerous machin
ery and bring onto the world such
as awful oaVamlty. ;
in
TO PEOPLE OE IDAHO
Ho' ce of Representatives,
Washington, D. C.
To the peupla of Idaho:
It Is now very apparent that I
ahall be denied opportunity of spend
ing much, if any, time in Idaho be
fore the election. As the (Republican
candidate for Congress from the
First Congressional District I am
compelled to make this statement and
to appeal to the people of the state
generally to support my candidacy.
In large part the people already
understand the situation, and I a!
tell the
FEOi BURTON L. FRENCH
I
Oct. 8 , 1918.
predate more than I can
many letters that are coming to me
from thoso I represent telling me
and
m
Tho Congress has been in , con
stant session since last December,;
and in almost constant session since
April, 1917. The werik of the Co '- 1
grass is very heavy— legislation that|P
has to do with human lives has been
before us again and again; leg'sla
tion that has to do with taxation,
that they propoee to give me their
support, regardless of party,
tliat they approve of my course
Congress.
legislative body since time began
has been called upon to consider the!
Con
I
Idaho
these
things I cannot return, in all «pr
ability before the general election
My duty is here You want me to
do my duty Important legislative!
matters are pending. Difficult and in
with problems pertaining to
well-being of our dear boys at
front and those dependent uipcn them
at home; legislation that has to do
with the welfare of our people— al
these things are being crowded up
Congress for consideration.
the
No
on
immense problems of the 65th
gress. ,
I would likî to return to
to talk to the people about
tricate departmental problems are
coming np every dày. Telegrams, let
ters, inquiries pertaining to a mul
titude of questions are constantly
coming in, and you want me to stay
the job where my conscience
tells me I should stay.
My record as your Member cf Con
on
gress
an open book.
On the war and everything pertain
ing to tho war I have felt it my
duty to support and uphold the ad
ministration. I stand for this policy.
I am in favor of Woman Suffrage
and helped pass the resolution thru
tb' House of Representatives.
I am in favor of National prohi
bition and helped pass that measure
turn th° House.
our formers and have helped in
higher basic Price for the|
I hMt labored for the interests of!
tain ng a
than was
Nc-thwçst for this year
had ast, and I was one of those in
the House who pushed the provision
tft-u yi.ing to cur farmers ?2.50 pei
bnf bel for their wheat. I stand for
bringing the farmer and the consum
er as closely together as possible
for the mutual benefit of both.
I supported the Lenroot revenue
amendment in the House and stand
for piecing the war burden chiefly
upon wealth, upon war profits and
T supported the War Risk Insur
auce law and it was my amendment
that was adopted by the Congress fix
iug ihe annuity system of compensa
tion for insurance to the great bene
fit of our soldiers and thdr families.
large incomes.
1 supported legislation in the na
tur» ot substitutes for bills intro
dneed by myself and others, grant
iug iefve of absence and exemptions
to homesteaders and miners on our,
west=m lands.
I have tried to do my duty faith-1
fully in the halls of Congress, before
tho Committees, before the Depart
meets, end in handling the multitude
oi matters that are brought to the
attention of your Representative. Upp
lhat record and denied the oppor-j
tunlty of making personal campaign
of the state for re-election, I must,
rely. |
in making this appeal I know the!
e.viufter of the people to whom l!
Oh
appeal. They are people who havej
gone ever the top in the service
our .-cuntry in every way since we|
beerm-" Involved in the war. They
top in fumishtaf
turn to do our fighting, In sending
uursos to our hospitals, in subscrib
ing; to Liberty Loans, Red Cross ser i
vi '.v and othor helpful agencies in !
hase gone over the
the war where drives have been
, , . . .
male. The people of our great state
: , , . " _
-Iare jOO per cent loyal to the core am
,
it is tc these people I appeal
* ,
support cf my candidacy for re-elec
c on Noyembcr 5th
Youra stocerely>
burtqn l pRENCH
for
1
..How Vessels Sink.
Nearly every class or design of ves* !
For in- !
sei sinks in a particular way.
stance, the old type of single-bottom
steamers, with few or no bulkheads—
that Is, In the modern sense of the
term—almost invariably founders on
more or less of an even keel nnd not
With the bow or stem up in the air.
KICK HIM ONCE
Oh, the Kaiser hcara the knell
that will ring him into hell for the
Yankee lads are rampsin',. are ramp
lain' on his trail; lie knows they've
'got him going and no mercy will be
showing till they've gouged hint in
thp llver or haV e landed him in jail,
It's a joy to see them chase hi m >
for we know they'll surely place him
t n a corner where they'll get him—
where they'll get him sure as 6 in;
with their bayonets they'll nick him,
with enthusiasm lick him, for its
written in the record that the Yaniks
are bound to win. But it takes a lot
Q f bullets and it taikes a lot of grit
to squirt hell into the Helniea til
!the Heinles want to quit and the
yanks are needing monpy for its
money buys thp lead the Yanks
[throw in the Heinies till the Heinies
a n are dead—oh, the Yanks are need
tug powder and the Yaniks are
ing shot for you've got to shcot a
Heinie before the brute'll rot, and the
moral of this story 1 am dishing; out
to you is dig up that dinerro and see
the Yankees through. While thej
Yanks are fighting, dying, why in
s e u a j n > t you a buying War Stamps
"[every day to hack up the boys
ra n C p; you can, hear
holler every time yon spend a do -
lar for a war Stamp for a
ßtamp helps a soldier kick the Kai
ser in the bosom of his pants.
the Kais; r
Wa:
CANDY FOR U. S. SOLDIERS
It isn't so long ago that candy was
considered to be a health-ruining dis
sipation for children, to which paren
tal consent was reluctantly given,
Children's teeth were alleged to be!
at the mercy of candy and all faul
ty dentition was attributed to a
taste for sweets. Experience, how
lever,'has proven that It was the ah-j
sence of the tooth brush, rather than
the presence of the gumdrop, that
was responsible for the deterioration,
of the children's teeth.
Aside from our past belief, we aroj
today confronted with the govern -1
ment calling for three-quarters of a
feed
is
°*
—Earl Wayland Bowman.
million pounds of candy to
soldiers. The "chocolate soldier"
no longer an ironical creature
the imagination, but a two-fisted figh
ing fact.
Candy,/which went into the war,
considered by most people to be a
purely non-esspntial luxury, has es
tablished itself today as a food pro
dûct of wonderful value.
While the conservation cf sugar is
necessary, and therefore the food ad
gen?ra,l
ministration has asfked for
Curtailment to which the candy manu
facturers have patriotically respond-'
ed by sacrificing one-half of th-ir re -
quirements, the general public
realizing that the boycott
ob-lcandy, which a short time^
came a popular indoor .sport for mans
well-meaning though mis nformed P™
not at all in accord with the
Con
is
on
now
he
Pi®. is
best interests of the coun rv
!ser ve on candy, but do not try
destroy a great industry seems
be the proper attitude in these times.
Conserve on sugar in candy, just as
the tafole,
to
to
you conserve on .sugar cn
but enjoy the candy which the food
administration authorizes candy manu
facturers to make.
TRAINING 5,000 SOLDIERS.
Nearly 5,000 returned soldiers, so!
much disabled that they could not
r -turn to their pre-war
}, aip been offered courses in
dnstrial re-education by the Depart-j
in
of Soldiprs' Civil Re-establish-1
mpD t i of Canada, the experience of
V 'hich organization has guided tbe
x.inited States War and Labor De
pur-tments and the Federal Vocation
a i Board in similar work.
Thp largest number of men to grad
ment
ua f e f rom courses in any one month
U, as 286, last June. The total num
her of graduates at that time
reached 767.
Only 302 soldiers have refused to
tbe courses offered them,
on i y 442 have failed to complete them:
of the 442, many were released tfmp
orardyj ^ a jiow them to engage, in
summer work an farms.
had
and
standard bred horse, color bay,
ofUplancM mover, perfectly gentle and
SIlfe {or WO n*n, elderly people and
children, good new Henny top buggy,
a | j-, Lamees, new whip, blanket,
i al g, buffalo robe, haulter, a splen
d ; d rig A sale cheap or exlchangel
for g'^d automobile, or good milk
cows.—A. E. Wood.
1
FOR 'SALE or EXCHANGE
42-t2.
Osts Brass in Ordnance Equipment
Included In the equipment furnished
each infantryman by the ordnance bu
of the war department are 62.7
rean
ounces of brass. This is exclusive of
the uniform equipment provided by the
quartermaster corps.
Used in the haversack are 1.8 ounce*
of brass ; in the bayonet scabbard, 0.5
ounce ; in the canteen cover, 0.2 ounce ;
cartridges (100), 47.4 ounces; cart
ridge belt, 10 ounces; guc sling, 1
oiier and thong case, 1.5
ounces; pouch for flrst-nld packet, 0.1
ounce,
ounce ;
Equipment from the ordnance bu
reau for 100,000 infantrymen contain?
almost 190 tons of krass.
CANDIDATE FOR SHERIFF
Having been duly elected as Re -
Candidate for the Office
Idaho,
publican
oi 'heriff of Payette County,
at the primaries held September 3,j
1918. I wish to express my appréciai
Hen for the support given mel at
said primary election. I wish also
It state to the voters of our County
lhat your support at th? coming gen-.
p ral election to be held on the 5th
day of November, 1918, will bo highly:
appreciated. My motto is i he en
forcement of all laws without favoi
ltism, especially the Prohibition Law.
Announcement,
Having received'the nomination at
the Democratic Primaries Sept. 3rd,
1918, J hereby announce in} self as a
candidate on the Democrat ticket for
Payette
JOHN T. JEFFHRIS.
County Commissioner
need-,County from the 2 nd district.
M. M. HURST,
of
ANNOUNCEMENT
Having been duly nominated at th e
Republican Primaries (September 3rd,
anuouncc
candidatc on the
il918, I hereby make the
piment that I am a
Republican ticket for the office
Assessor for Payette County.
of
D. B. COATS.
The United States Food Administra
tion is constantly bringing before the
people the great importance of con
serving food in order that the .prom
j SP to the Allies to send them sevn
teen cne -half million ton of food
this y ear ma y jj e carried out.
must be do ne, and t be cooperation of
Lhf , people in the strict observance)
C f a ll ru le,s laid down by
administration is the only way
do jt go long ps oUr armies are re
, u j red to re mam in service, just so
lorv . wlu the peo ple of this nation be
required to continue in the strict ob
servance of the food measures and
to send food to our nfen at the front,
So far we have not been called up
Cn to make one single sacrifice and
p.-rhape will not between new and
tue day of victory, hut we must con
itsltinue to economize, and not slacken
i;: cur efforts to produce. Food is the
All essential.
This
the food
to
We will publish from time to time
tho new regulations as laid down by
th» Food Administration. Read them
and let your loyalty be your guide
iD observing them.
a
j
,
MARTIN O. LUTHER
nominat'd for Probate Judge on the
vocations,iLemorratic il kît to s ;cce d Mms If.
Discouraged. >,
,,j, ve given up trying to keep a
: hired girl."
!
j
"What's the matter?"
"I've come to the conclusion that
when it comes to paying wages I
can't compete with n munitions fac
tory."
Heat Sufferer.
"Suffer much from flic-heat?"
"I should say so. Nearly had a sun
stroke rushing around to lay In nexi
vlnier's coal."
Walter Watts
Transfer
. ^ . . 1
JVlïîClS OI" JLl^flt
_ _ _ ..
gmCl OGaVy rlaUIlIlg
QQ |^0
Prices Right
Satisfaction
Guaranteed
Automobile Trucks
House Phone 88-j
Quick Service
sonic hall
WASHOE LODGE NO. 28.
.
A. F. & A M. arc held In the Ma
In the Thurston-Crighton
building on the second Tuesday eve-|^
0 f each month. All sojourning
Master Masons are fraterqally Invit
p re gent.
ea
I
1
Your Advantage as a
clothes buyer
1
store rather than another for your
of the store.
YOU choose one
That's
not the advantage
advantage;
the way you ought to do.
But it'd quite important that you know just where vom ,ul\«witage i. ,
you'll find it in the quality of the merchandise more than in tin pii< c,
and you'd better not trust your own judgment too far as to quality
these days.
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Copyright 1918 Hart Schaffner & Marx
Hart Schaffner <fir Marx clothes
are known for quality. Your advantage as a clothes
buyer is in what you get; and when you get these there's
no greater advantage.
• If you need clothes this fall,
saving
we're ready to help you d
See the new fall mackinaws, underwear, shirts, Hats etc.
a complete assortment ready for y
o some
I
i i
T
oil
si i i
E. C. KEITH & Son
The home of Hart Schaffner & Marx clothes
Walk-Over Shoes
:
i
Sets Pastor to Thinking,
If there should be a noticeable
Ing off in male pedestrian traffic on
the east side of Illinois street, between
Washingt on and Maryland streets, per
sons who have seen Scrgt. V. B. Brown
on recruiting duty will say he is re
sponsible for It- The army recruiting
station Is 53% South Illinois street,
and Sergeant Brown patrols that par
ticular part of the city. If he sees a
young man looking into a shop win
dow or looking at passengers aboard
the street cars, he asks him : "Now,
why aren't you in the army of your
Uncle Sam?" He stopped a young
clergyman,
bit In my own way," replied the pas
I think I am doing nfy
tor.
Sergeant Brown reports that he
failed to enlist the preacher, but said,
"I set him to thinking."—^Indianapolis
News.
At the Party.
Dorothy was Invited to a party
i(vhpre nU the other g|r]g were , grf
year8 0 i der than she.
Or
ome s h e 8a id to her mother: "Moth
» rf i an awfully good time, and I
gvas the bahleai one theqp/'
fi u
4
Victory Receipts
Furnished by Mrs, Reva Cree-Tweedy, Chairman County
Home Economics Committee
ROLLED OATS BREAD
2 cups boiling water
1-2 teaspoonful salt
1-2 cup molasses
1 tablespoonlul butter
1-2 yeaet coke mixed with
lukewarm water
1 cup rolled Oats
4 1-2 cups Sunshine flour. 1
Add boiling water to oats and let
stand 1 hour
Add molasses, salt, butter, yeast
cake mixture and flour.
Ret rise to double its bulk, heat
thoroughly, turn into buttered pans;
let rise again and bake 45 minutes. ,
I
1-2 cup
I
The Payette Mills

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