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Payette enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho) 1909-1935, January 09, 1919, Image 6

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055199/1919-01-09/ed-1/seq-6/

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/
Sf-' -
PIPE
r;>
Standard and Extra Heavy
for
V.
»
IRfilGA TION AND
PUMPING PURPOSES

(
||
jjj j
saoeess; j
Place Your Orders Now for
■* Early Spring Delivery
We can supply your wants in any size
from 2 inch to 24 inch
Payette Valley Rex Spray Co
jj
I j
I
SPRA Y MA TERIAL AND COAL
E5s£sjm3nai
!¥»«!■ Bll
Electrical Expert
For Electric trouble, of anv kind
of car see d v V
Electrical Expert , H. E. VAN
VALKENBURG, Foreman , has
had 8 years experience in Electri
cal work . Electric trouble
shooting
is easy remedied when you know how.
Van Valkenburg can fix it.
Overland Service Man
/
When your Overland doesn't tvork
to suit you, see W. A. McKroskey ,
Assistant Foreman.
He has spe
cial knowledge of the Overland and
can make it run like new
PAYETTE MODERN GARAGE
qf.\ - '
PAYETTE VALLEY REA). •
ESTATE AGENCY BARGAINS
Best Prune and Apple propos!
.Mm ill Idaho at a bargain for quick
most be sold, thU la your
bargain deal. Paid)
tarn
chance to make a
up water, good equipment for hand
bag fruit, 1 mile from loading sta
j_160 acre tracts to exchange for
Payette poperty are well Improved
Smile from two stations and roads,
soil to trade for divers- 1
Your opportune j
to get a paying investment and
turn your orchard that you have
^Jbeen kicking about *o long.
^_v*ne well furnished fifty room
City of 2000 people,
VtWn town, proeperoua
x trade for Payette
rtv. Jup>.
ntlng good hotel
beat of
fled or fruit tracts.
ho-;
onlyj
com-,
out-'
thing
busi
*
the
\
, j
'
- (
\ j
L \s«wing a* bridge;
^'ills.—Mrs. S. 1.1
1
A. E. WOOD, Manager.
« 2 .
tM
%
V
ARRIVAL OF TRAINS JAN. 1st, 191g
i N <>- 18—1:27 a. m.
No. 17—2:45 a.
No. 86-7:40 a.
No. 85—8.45
No. 4—10:10 a. m.
No, 6—6:10 p. m.
No. 19—9:15
m.
m.
a. m.
p. m.
No. 5—9:26 p. m.
P. V. L«avo
I
I
377—7:45
Ar. 378—2:45
a. m.
p. m.
Alphabetical Possibilities.
All the Inhabitants of the globe, on
a rough calculation, could not In UOOO,
000,000 years write out all the possl
We transpositions of tlie 26 letters of
^e alphabet, even supposing that each
person wrote 40 pages dally, and each
which pages contained not less than
^ transpositions of the letters,
-*—
File Summer Solstice.
June 21 is the d«y of the year when
Ihe sun is directly over the equator,
nud for several days about that time
there Is no observable difference on I
his position, or his hours of rising and
setting. It is the longest day of the
year. |
I
1
METHODIST CHURCH.
Hie Rev, W. A. Ewing, of
Boise,'
j cur new district superintendent, will
u conduct the morning
j I Sunday.
service next
"
■ I
The business meeting will
held Saturday evening at
b.<
! o'clock.
' Evening Preaching service« at 7.
j Epworth League at 6.
I
! Let ' s remember to bring our con
jtrlbution next Sunday for the suffer
■lug Armenian«.
P. m.
I
I
It Is a pprlvilege tc give and to
serve.
You are invited.
deliver bis lee
H. K. WALLIS, Pastor.
I
!
BAPTI8T CHURCH
The pastor will
ture on the Tabernacle in the
ing next Sunday instead of in the
evening.
morn
!
j

,
You win want to hear this •sub-'
ject. Evening subject: "A
Man's Fatal Mistake."
Young
W. H. SWARTZ. Pastor.
ADVERTISED LETTER LIST
For we<*k ending Jan. 4, 1919.
Ha'Ijlke, Miss Emma.
MilDr, Elgin.
McCormick, Miss Alma
Shannon, Florence.
E. T. BOWMAN, P. M.
j eye
I tail
i
5 p ;
j
ford
WEATHER REPORT.
For week ending Jan. 7th,
in.
Highest temp. 32, date 7 th.'
Lowest temp. io below, date 1.
Means total none.
none.
Precipitation
days 7
Partly cloudy 0.
Cloudy 0.
Direction of wind North.
E. F. ALLEN. Observor.
For Sale.-— Driving horse, site for
ladle« and cildren. Phone 283J.7.
N. M. Jensen. 2t2
Naturally.
A new baby sister arrived at Fi
die's house.
Next day at klndergt
ten the teacher asked hint what
were going to name his new little ni -
1er. Freddie thought deeply a minute
and then exclaimed:
ing to name it Mrs.
after my mother."
ir - 1
"Oh, we're go
Throckmorton,
Easy to Learn to Do I
Whosoever really
■booses to do right and
and
J
, . persevere«
• )ln ? it shall learn how.—Aaron A
in Crane.
Good Explanation.
* s Attending the kindergarten
children asked why It was
tIlnt men ,n ke their hats otr and worn- .
^'ave theirs on. The teacher ex- i
Pained that It was a custom, hu» that I
dldn,t seem t0 *>H*fy Bob. who said
know; because men are nice, bi>:
girls are nicer."
t
ôfiK
If
■ I
'J
ll ■*
F •
}
1
B
i
çr^** 0
-or
j
A BAD FALL
r;
!■
! ; may cause subluxaUons of the spin
si.\eio
I j suift ring and various forms of chron
resultiui
verl
irae,
in
ic disease.
Chiropratie
ailed dis
adjusts the cause of s<
I ease and proves
health.
atuiv's key to
Telephone for appointment.
I No charge f or Consultation.
Em
p„ T ... jj jj
rayeue, iaa,
tia i t M MUi
pimpoucc finr u- ~n r-,i ,
on,, noi.fcb ilU ! . AhL' iO FlLL j
--- 1
j Tlie -e are many churches that at- j
j tract attention by tlieir . izc and grand-j
There are a few that are remark-j
Is mnUci-v^T °V!V !lr ' ; i" ill l n r S ,e Ild
ÄulsJ*. Engill 1S S '
It is a primitive and quaint stone
,
I.-s and door*and Hie' furniture "is of '
narrow, diamond
paued windows give light to the inte- j
When the church Is full 30 per
sons are gathered together.
.Only ;
DR. W. ß. SIMS
Chiropractor
Crighton Elk.
Religious Edifices in England Where
the Congregations Are of Neces
sity Rather Small.
I
eur.
building with a roof of red tl' s anti a j
Huy vvnlherboarded turn i at its west '
S,cnd. This miniature church is only 16 j
feet square.
the plainest.
Fiv
nor.
j
tlle mwtin?
house at CrawshaWbooth,
near Burnlev.
t
\ill,i'~<
; d Is covered
a village
It is known as the
Friends' meeting house
with ivy and surround
cared-for burial
by a well
Instde may
round.
_*n oaic benches that
be seen half a d
could, If ns cess
persons. The attendance is rarely more
than six.
irv, accommodate 60
Some
is one 1
nnt sn.allpr than this chapel
at lias been called the shrine
of Qu;.\v:-iMn. It is in fhe hamlet of
-Ton:
. Thither
( oine Q; r.l.ers
iin?;
Buekinghnmslm
in .Tir e of each
■ear
n all parts, for
of William Pc nn.
*
If
were not
enough to make the place inter, ding,
it has tli fiii-iin :■ nurecti'.n of be
■ ri-,, ! In v.-hich Milton
aradlse Lost," a
cottage in the vicinity affording him a
resting place.
ing the nei
live
er writing
at

I
Taught English to Use Thimbles.
('in to have been intro- !
!and ns articles of com
mon use by a man named John Loft-1
IdlTi who came over from Holland at
1,1 ;' Ild seventeenth century and
established a thimble factory at Isling
The word thimble is said to be de
rived from the Scotch thuinmel or
H'" 11 ' 1 ;;- 11 ' n «Ort of shlehL-St Louis
Globe-1 emocrat
Thimbles s
dticcd into K,
G
>/s to Be Sought.
The
1 lies
Beyond the
tcit touched,
talnable, never de
spaired of, never found, always in the
prospect, never in the
something cert
something unknown to the past
Raymond.
o ne reached for but
«able.
U1
exp<
rneuce,
future,
—Glif
for
tho
)
You
bargains at
can always find
our store
Hard Wood Kitlien Cal »mets
$ 21.00
$31 00
$35.50
i.
i l
R Hard Wood Dilli
El
n
a
ng Tables
Library Tables, Hard Wood
$17.50 to $30.00
$12.40
$14.25
$16.80
$22.40
d hand goods to sell
see us
it
t<
«
u
«
If you have
secon
Come and
DON'T WORRY STORE
J. W. Vanderford, Prop.
NOETHPAYETTE
Harry White, who is in the 77th
IX-.ision, writes from Chaumont,!
r i a nee saying that he has seen much
of - hell-torn France, seems to think
bat he will be sent home soon. He
ays that there isn't a word in the
I Knglish language that could adequate
fly describe the muddy condition of the
roads over- there.
Mr. Hearst and family of William
creek spent Sunday at the McGrevy
heme.
j Mr. and Mrs. T. Moggridge expert
to return from Salem, Ore., about
: «January 10th.
r. McClure of Emmett has
pu**~
j L hasc!tl the McNeil farm and will move
Lu», the place early in February.
Mrs. A. J. Shearer has had
a re
apse and is again confined to her
Mi. Henry, who has been visiting
j "• t,ie Oregon side, expects to spend
xt wecJc with Mrs. E. F. Lattig.
Mr. ar.d Mrs.
I
A. Robertson and
• amily, who are moving from Weiser
j o New Plymouth, have been visiting
i-'1rs. James She'arer.
j
The Misses Rock and Miss Hill
• pent the week-end in Weiser.
Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Joplin, from the
elope, spent Sunday at the M. A. Burt
home
D. J ° nes of Whitley Bottom has
{been a guest of R. G. Thornton.
The Misses Andrews have returned
rom Boise where they spent the
holidays.
which has been sold.
Mr. and Mrs. Nute Draper, who
r.rre on the Craven place last year,
xpcct to mOTe to Boise valley the
reason.
Gertrude Lesh is home from Vale,
i e., where she has been visiting,
A. P. O. 731 by Elizabeth Andrews,
representative of thc Home Com
unication Section of the American
- ed Cross. The letter was dated Oct.
7th, 1918, and tells of the last days
Mrs. Clco Qualls is in Weiser this
week. Mr. and Mrs. Qualls expect to
from the McNeil place
ovo scon
The following is part of a letter
written from Base Hospital No 42
r Milton R. Miller who was selected
by draft from
June: "Milton R. Miller passed away
! 11 Cur hospital at 5 P. M. yesterday.
a was wounded in the right leg, the
ound became infected with gas bac
r.::J in spite of careful care of
s and electors we could not save
I do not think that he ever
thought of leaving his comraoes anc
lU
n - .'.
his life.
was so J oll y and so grateful for every
-hing we did for him. Today we car
wd him to the little cemetery whereis
we bury our soldier dead. It was a
Jj tary funcixil, s.x of his Lon:rade_
. ...
' orr;ed hl _ m out and the casket
•'bre-reti with tho flag which he fought
ar 'd died for. The cemetery is
the sunny slope of a hill, bright with
flowers
on
The French people love
beys and stand at attention with hats
our
removed when we carry our boys by
them. They know the price we are
r>ayin ^- ° ur flea d who lie in France
sca ^ a friendship which can never
^ broken/' This one department
of the Red Cross work is of priceless \
value to those who mourn.
-'--
Erectn s
at, Eta „d and walk erect This keeps
)l(r circulation in order and also ex- S
sands our lungs to the fullest Be s
straight like the Indian who believed
being erect, and in reaching his
Ughest stature that he might the bet
liston to the voice of the
Spirit.—Camp Fire Magazine Wokepo
FOR RENT: 6 room modern house.
Good location.—I. W. Kenward Phon<
284-r5.
I
FORREST STAMEV
Mr. and Mrs. F. Stanley,

Dec. 5th, 1918.
Is Sur Tille, France,
Dear Folks:—
I
j
I
Received your letter today,
received two this week.
Have
You are do
ing fine now.
Your celebration was all right after
all, and the big thing is
keeps now. There is not a chance ot
Germany fighting any
wont have anything to fight with. ;
hope they hang the kaiser. He sure
ought to be, then he couldnt
over for
They
more.
cause any
more trouble on earth, but I'll bet
would try to start something in hell.
I see the president is coming over
here on the same boat we cams overj
She sure is some big boat, ana
can carry a load.
on.
There was eight
j thousand soldiers, five hundred sail
: ors besides the crew of eleven hun
I , , ,
ared on her whe " we came over, and it
was sure crowded, and it was hot in
our berthing space and the bunks
■ wcre hard and so many in the space
j bunks, four deep, and as close to- i
j 8 e ther as they could be; the last threel
c, ays of the trip we had to sleep with
our clothes on, also life jackets, and a ,
c °nteen of water tied on; I'll say
didn't sleep much. We had two sub-1
marine alarms and had to beat it to
our deck space and wait for the ship
to sink, but they never even fired at
us > but the boats all turned the
loose and it sounded like Fourth of
Jul Y for a few minutes. When the
aIarm is sounded no one is allowed to
talk any, just march out if you are ,r.
your berthing space, if on deck go the
nearest way to your jumping off place
I am glad we never had to jump ofl,j
the water locked cold and no telling
bow long we would have to stay in it.
Of course there was life boats
la *te to take care of all, but if
drew a raft you could only hang onto
tlle sides,
gum
and
you
We had abandon ship drill
ever y day so every one knew just what
to do - We were very safe
as we were
in the center of the convoy; there
thirteen troop shipß, three destroyers
and one battle cruiser with us all th(
were
way across; and three days out ot
Brest we met sixteen more destroyers.
They escorted us through the mosi
zone. The last day ai:
ships and balloons sailed along
wasn't much
j us > so y° a see there
chan «e for a sub.
over
The convoy was a
reat sight; all the troop ships sail
a > n 8T three abreast, with the destroyers
sailing 1 around us all the time.
sailed in a zig zag course all the time.
Wc
Ad the ships were camouflaged;
; some
looked like two ships and some lookec.
like nothing you had ever seen;
looked very small,
destroyer painted on her side so it
looked like a destroyer sailing righ!
by her.
none
One boat had a
_
Drest, where we landed,
interesting 1 place. This town
built in 1300. Didn't get to see much
\ °f « is all walled in, and there has
been many wars over it in olden times
cam P« d in Napoleon's Barracks
were also walled in high stone
Wal1 With sharp piecés of « lass P ut ir
S ° n ° 0ne cou,d S et over . barracks
s ^ one and old style workmanship. His.
Nepoleon's, prison was there an-d you
could see where he shot the prisoners
bullet holes in the wall; he stood then
tJlwr
UP ' n .° f a b ° ard fixed in the
wall which is still there and is now
carved full
was a ver;
wa.
ar<
. ... .
of American soldiers
We were there three days
then went to Dizohn, then here, havent
any of the battle ground yet, and
don
names.
seen
t expect I will get to, we expect
to move to Brest or Bordeoux
next move, which may be some time
yet.
It won't be so hard here
now, as
starting tomorrow, we get an eigh 1
hour day. Most all the machinery is
going in the big bakery, and they
quitting all the field bakeries,
output is 800,000 pounds per day
but could be
are
our
now,
more. The French gov
ernment will take the bakery
soon
will be some time before the French
will have all the flour they need,
I they will use the bakery and i
j.so much each day to the people;
jyou know France is very small and
the can ship bread from here anywhere
in France and it will still be in good
shape. • Most everything in France
will be run by the government for
I am going to bring my
mess kit home so if I go back on the
road when I get in a hotel that has
bum cats, I can eat out of
over as
as we are throug-h with it. It
so
issue
as
some time.
my mess
kit and feel natural-like, and I also
want to see how it would look spread
out on a white table cloth.
I know Laura feels like shouting
and I guess every ones folks feel the
same way, I know I do even if I didn't
get in the war, no one better ever say
I didn't do my bit, I know I'll fight if
Ithoy do after this five
twelve and eighteen hours hard
every day.
months of
labor
W e are still in the tents and
jail winter, but the
better than the barracks,
(bit our company Put don't
much yet, those that have
jonly been in the hospital
week.
will be
*y are warmer and
• The flu has
ainount to
had it have
about
expecting to have it
as 1 very seldom have a cold and w
bookoo clothes.
a
I am not
ear
Lookoo means, in Frepch,
many, so shuley n
many bunions, but there is no chance.
have two pair of trench shoes,
mach or
t will have
Bans
big
ones and little ones, if the little
hurt I
ones
ones, also have
wear the big
some big boots.
I hope you get the Ann.
i am anxious for the package
you get the package I
I much, its so hard to
he'that can be sent 1
| work Xmas, worked'i ,d ,e
had a chicken dinner tl u 'f
r8a i dinner since I can- .
j Co.
s penrut.
I hope
It wasn't
get anything here,
! we will
ving day,
the first
fere. The
ruit
;nt.
commander b
which went very
Morts ought to be out o
a!
a
small
cake
.
t!:e army
-, and Shirley ought to be home
soon , and I'll bet a hundr.-.l francs .
am home in April, r
Think I will quit fur tin
(Merry Xmas
With love!
Address my letter-
have been; don't put the :
I'address ■
soon
me by March.
time.
and Happy New Year.
•s
FORREST,
as you
n on the
EVIDENCE OF LITTLE WORTH
Illegibility of Shakespeare's Signature
Does Not Prove He Did Not
Write the Immortal Plays.
Some years ago, when '
peare controversy was ... its height,
one of the contentions of the party
who declared that the bard lmt only
had not written the immortal plays
but could not
Slinkes
even write his own
name, gave as evidence the existing
signatures that are of undoubted au
thenticity.
On the
same grounds It might be
argued that Richard 111 was unable
to write, if one decided the
from the signature to a
peace with Francis, Duke of Brittany,
which is reproduced in a London deal
er's catalogue just received.
It is a mystery how the cataloguer
mannged to make "Richard Rex" out
of the shaky scribble which is there
reproduced. It. Would Ik* quite as like-'
ly to stand for Will Shakespeare, were
it not that the smaller word stands
matter
treaty of
second and the longer one first.
Barnum Generous Manager.
According to the original contract
which Barnum made with Jenny Lind,
she contracting to sing 1.70 concerts
in the United States and Havana for
81,000 a concert, the contract provid
ing, however, that if Barnum made a
clear profit of fl,7.000 sterling from the
first 75 concerts, Miss Lind should, for
the remaining 7.7 concerts, receive, in
addition of $1,000 a concert, one-fifth
of the profits; but that, on the other
hand. If the first 50 concerts fell short
of Barnum's expectations, she could
have half of the
the remaining 100 concerts.
gross receipts from
Before
the concerts began, however, tlmt con
tract was, at Barnum's Instance, re
scinded and a new contract mnda
which resulted ln Miss Lind's receiv
ing In profits from the concerts
she gave under It almost twice
much as she would have received
der the original contract.
which
an
un
Hypodermic Syringe in Crime.
Du Chnlllon
who invented the hy
podermic syringe, seems to have been
a sort of Fagin. .He established in
Paris a school of crime
from which
such youngsters ns "Charley Bates"
a " d t , he "Artful Dodger" graduated,
Stimulated by an injection of mor
Pbine or some other drug,
they went
out to do great deeds in the criminal
line. When the "school" was raided
the principal
v as found to show his part in some
daring crimes. Physicians attached
to the criminal bureau saw the great
advantage of the hypodermic
and It has ever since been
nlzod agency In medical
evidence
syringe,
1
a recog
practice.
Unexpected Destinations.
People who dig holes In dykes must
not complain if they are swept away
in the floods they loose. For they gen
erally are.
When Talleyrand was asked %vhat
he did during the reign of terror in
the French revolution, he replied:
lived." That, for one of the original
lenders of the revolution, was no slight
achievement. And the French revolu
tion itself, beginning as an earthquake
of radicalism and ending with an cm
poror and imperialistic conquests, re
mains a classic instance of an historic
landslide terminating not at all where
its propellers Intended.
Winnipeg's Growth.
Prior to 1870 Winnipeg was nothing
more than a chief trading post of the
Hudson Bay company, whose head
quarters were at Fort-Garry (erected
in 1835), on ground now Included In
the city. The first house of the ham
let wns built In 1860. The city was In
corporated in 1873, and Its growth
since has been marvelous. The area
of the city by 1012 was 12,700 acres.
The population In 1870
1Û16 It wus 102,999.
was 300; In

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