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Payette enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho) 1909-1935, February 27, 1919, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055199/1919-02-27/ed-1/seq-2/

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verte Enterprise
"
IMUEO EVERY THURSDAY.
WILL WELLS, Owner.
WILL WELLS.
Editor and Manager
SüDÉereü
second ~ci*Ka (uatler
j«t il, iy07. &t 'ho poitoMoe at
Idaho w
*' March 8. 2879
AUK
H«.y
n.lor the Act of Congress
The Kaiser with his 500-odd uni
THURSDAY, FEBR'Y 27,1919
i
THE KAISER.
i
forms seems to be all dretsed up
with no place to go.—New York Teie
graaph.
If William had trtad half
I
hard
to commit suicide as lie endeavored
to conquer the world lie would hav to
had one succer® to his credit. —Osh
kosh Nortnwestem.

'
tbo
kaiser on an island willbe al right
if this Island is in the tropics, and
inhabited by mosquitoes and cootie*
and a volcano.
Tilg Dutch Proposal to put
Richmond Newts-Lead
Wlihblm claims to have been
cn
a >acht when the war started. We
know ho was on a tobqggan when. It
hnded.—Brooklyn Eagle.
Maximilian u ar ri«n . . o _
Was a tool in war H i ht in
added £2 the cr^prtat "Ll l
*ort of monkey wrench. Chicago
Kaiser's backers are quitte hl m
von by von —Wall Street Tournai
How would it do to «et the kaiser
adrl t in n don- and guarantee him
the freledom of the esas—New York
Telegraph.
Holland couldn't ecsape the horrors
of war. Wilhelm is there now.—Brook
lyn E\,igle.
Germany's greatest work
.
of
art is that final bust of the kaiser.
President Wilson beat the kalesr
Bill to Paris after all.—Lowell Courte
God
and
—Brooklyn Eagle.
I
-Cltidea.
The truth of the matter Is
has never been with Wilhelm
Wilhelm is never going to be wfch
God. It will be an. entirely different
linhup.Houtson Post.

The kaiser's case proves that no*
Wady lias a monopoly on the Lord
Atchison Mall.
Big BillHohenzollern now realize»
moi*- eleary than ever what a mistak
he made when he picked on quirt,
peaceable Wood Wilson.—Anaconda
-Standard.
)
Loath b(y Snaldes and Wild Animals.
Vice Consul C. M. Haywood, station
ed at Calcutta, in a recnet report
declare« tha over 26,000 {persons in
British India died from
snake
bite® or wlere killed by wild animals
during 1917. Snake bite caused tbe
death of over 23,900, ho states—an
mcrease of nearly 300 over the ffeur
of 1916—and 2176 persons were b'Ued
by wii animals—about 100 less thaji
Itaidiu around $1,000 were paid. Tigers
were responsible for about 1 000
deaths, leopards for 339, wolves and
IDars for 820, and elephants and
hytena® for about 85. Of the deaths
caused by other animals nearly 100
are assigned to pigs and abput 200
to alligators and crocodiles. During
the yiogr 19,400 wild arlirais were d
streyed for which rewards amount'mg
in the year previous. The number ot
snakes destroyed was over 73,900, for
the killing of which bounties
agg re
were paid by the
to over $54,100
government.
Of these 3,295
tigers,6,000 leopards, 2,700 bears and
2,100 wotve®.
wer®
Women Demand Justice. French
women have petitioned the peace con
ference for justice in the rame of th<
thousands of wom'°n and children win
suffered unspeakable jnd'pndtie® and
•vit» mlstroajtment ait mhe hands cf
The
the Germans during thewar.
petition asked that the Huuns who
ordered th:«e crime® as well a® thos
who executed them
be condemned
in
order that there may never he a reçu
a* criminals of the common law
rrtanee erf usch atrocities.
,
PLUCK, ALL RIGHT.
Well said Uncle Si Bruggtos after
a solo by a fashlonaibla church cho'r
tenor, if that ain't thh rudest thing
I ever «aw. just as soon as theyoung
man began to etag, eiveiy othier mem
ber Or the choir stoppled. But he wen
through with it, and I must say I ad
mire his spunk."
Boston Transcript. 1
I
WHAT IS TRUTH
L« truth ain't alius easy to get at,
said Uncle Ebon. A man kin sometlm
say sumpin' in a minutie dat he can't
explain In By® years."-—Washtajjitc*
...
.

t
A BEAL PIONEER.
Fifty year.; in one community cer
to the honor of
I ta inly entitles anyone
being a pioneer, and a pioneer of fifty
j years ago in this community, without
question knows what it means to be|
Peter Pence was one of the early
a,
and.
a
a real pioneer.
[ settlers of the Territory of Idaho
j crossing the plains in 1862 with
j party of about 300 men, women
, children who had become enthused
I with the gold excitement in this early
idays. Mr. Pence is a native of
sylvania, leaving that state in 1852!
settling in the state of Kansas, which
,
I was at that time the extreme frontier
[of civilization^ In the spring of
young and full of ambition, and eager)
to explore the west, he started with
his party which consisted of 60 wagonslbest
[drawn by oxen, mules and horses, and
about 300 people including women and
children. The Indians at that time
were hostile and caused much trouble
I and disaster to smaller parties who
were crossing the plains, but they
being well armed and were kept well
guarded were 'unmolested. The only
real misfortune was the death of three
of the party while enroute, and on Sep
tember 2Gth camped at the hot spring.;
where the town of Vale now stands
That night a child was born and on
man in the party died. The party re
mained over the next day while a
coffin was made from the lumber of
a wagon box to bury the unfortunat
nian -
A fe ' v da y® ' ater tbe y reached th"
p!ace where Baker City is now lo
^ * **
" ,C ^ h ° US f*
Herc they ,earned of the Hiold dis
CCWry at W£rren and Uoise
and after a few davs P 1 '®? 01 ' 31 ' 0 " Mr.
Pcnce in com P ar 'V with seven oth. r
men ea - ui PP ed with one y° ke of oxon
two saddIe P onies a wa£f0n with
water-tight bed for crossing rivers, I
and a winter's supply of provisions
took tbo back trail for Boise basin,
.
Mr. Pence and a man by the name o'
Wagner rode the ponies going ahead
[ leaving the others to follow with the
I ox team. They arrived at the Snake
River and were taken across in a skiff
which had very recently been built
jfor that purpose, landing on what i:
now called Whitley Bottom, paying
the owner of the skiff $3.00 each for
inking them across.
p en ce's
This was Mr
first introduction into the
[territory of Idaho. That night as i!
was getting dark, and feeling that
I they wero rather safe from any in
trusion by the hostile reds, camped r
,
a little gulch near the bank of th
Payette river where Falk Store is
now located, but had only got the
little camp fire started when directly
across the river and not over three
hundred yards distant, the doleful
sound of an Indian war-dance and the
iingling of heeds was heard.
Their
fire was soon extinguished and a rapid
moving of camp several miles up the
iver took place.
The next day they overtook a party
of 32 men at Horse-shoe bend w'r.i
were also bound for the Boise Bas'r
in search of ?okl . A few (lays afl
rrach the Basin Mr p
Wagner went back to meet the rest cf
the party with the ox team and pro
visions. arr.l found them at the Snak
doing a good business brmgin
- r;l/e ^ ers across in the wagon bet!
That w, ' nter Mr ' Pe r nce and a by
name of Sam Kinney purchased r
second-hand whip-saw converting logs,
)nto boards by hand, and in the spring |
°l d a '- °f their output at $300 per,
thousand for the erection of a saloon j
t Idaho City. |I
During that
summer (1863) great
throngs of men came into the basin
I in the fail 15,000 votes were cast
Mr. Pence,
during that year, devoted his time in !
hauling logs with an ox team for the
at t' o general election.
buildings of the rapid growing town
of Idaho CÙy. and that fall soid hisj
freighted provisions ftom Umatilla
dlc mining camps at Idaho City, an<
èar\y in the summer of 1866 -went
Portland and purchased a threshin"
"
■hum and during 1864-65 packed and
machine and after threshing for th
early settlers of the Bojse valk;
sold his outfit receiving in exchang
25 pounds of gold dust, and on Jan
uary 9th, 1867 camped on his way tc
Walla Walla at what is now the Slick
, ranch. At Walla Walla he purchaser'
ja hunch of cattle and drove them back
to the mouth of Big Willow where ho
bought from a squatter his right to
the ranch now owned by Walter and
Harry Pence. These cattle were the
first beef cattle brought into the ter
,d ^ or y °f Idaho, and the beginning of
Mr. Pence's 50 years career in th
1 business.
I In 3872 Mr Pence was married tc
Miss Anna Bjxby who with her people
nad a ' so cr °ssed the plains :u 1862
and who 1 ' aci passed to her reward
some 16 years ago.
In the year 1877 when the Indian"
made their second outbreak Mr. Pence
) was with General Howard in the In
dian war, and in 1878 was captain of
a band of home scouts. Mr. and Mrs.
Pence Jived on their Willow Creek
ranch for many years and continued
in the stock business with marked sue
cess and acquired many more acre.
of valuable land, moving to Payette
in 1882. To them were born eight
i chiIdren , six of whom are now living,
four boys and two girls, the youngest,'
'Mrs. Rex Bradshaw having the dis
' tinction of bein S the «»t 8 irl baby
jborn in the own of Payette. Mr. Pence
I may have raised black sheep when in
the sheep business, but he has failed
to raise any in his family. They arc
[all chips off of the old block.
1 of the entire party of 300 who
Penn-lerossed the plains with Mr. Pence in
1862 there are but five known to be
Hying in this section.
Mrs. Henr
frvin and Mrs Holland
of Payette
1862,[John Bivens of Ontario, Mrs. Cosh
Nichols ami Mr. Pence who is still e
resident of Payette and enjoying th'
of health, and who returned las f
week from Boise where he was in at
1 tendance at t>e Stock Mens' convcn
tion,
r
THE AWKARD ALARM CLOCK
Have you any alarm oolcks."
quired the cutsonmr. What I want Us I
onh that will arouse the girl wtth-j
out waking the whole family."
I don't know of any such alarm J
clock as that madam," said the man
the ordinary kind—the kin that will
wake the whole family without dis- j
turbim/g the girl."—Tit Bits.
Nothing makes the devil so much;
in-i
trouble as to meet a mm he can't |
browbeat.—William A. Sunday.
Germany spent 40 yearn making
prepft-ntiens for this war, and she
will have to spend another 40 years
^ *
V1,,a • )l ' 3t b " P » made
her of the Italian cabinet
isn '' our old frlr ' nd VIlla ° f 1Vr " xico ~!
who however, is still very much alive
after being mortally wounded over
40 tlmes and klIled at least a d ° zen I
tlmeB -
a mem- '
But It j

1
Notice for Publication of Time Ap- !
pointed for Proving Wilt, Etc.
In the Probate Court of Payette
County, State of Idaho.
In the Matter of The Estate of Alfred
Smith, Deceased.
Pursuant to an order of said Court
made on the 15fch. day of February.
1019, notice is hereby given that Tuck
day the 11th day of March, 1919, at
10 o'clock A. M. of said day, at the
Court Room of said Court, at the
Courthouse in the City of Payette
County of Payette, Idaho, has been
appointed as the time and place for
proving the will of said Alfred Smith,
deceased, and for 'hearing the appli
cation of J. H. Smith for the issuance
to him of letters of administration
with the will annexed, when and
where any person interested may ap
pear fed contest the same.
Dated February 15th. 1910.
MARTIN O LUTHER,
Clerk.
WORD FROM PAUL FICKE
Dear Mather and Sister-:
Just a few line® to night to let
you know that I had not forgotten
your birtdays, alttho I believe this
letter is a little late. I am sending
my lovo and best wishes hopping that
you will spend this day and many
more in happiness. I wish to im-j
press on your mind as to the honor,
iij whioh I hold my mother.
A better MOTHER could net
found in tho whole world.Up to this
Thi n way you have taken care of my
clothing and food was service good
enough for the president. To bo
brought up 11 Wo some of the children
have
bo
day I am proud of the way you have
takl°ncare of me in my childhood daft
seen in my travels is a
shame, and I am thankful that I had
proper bringing up.
You 6Ure haVc done your du'le® in
H f e and inay God credit you in full
Thebe on€ regret, and that Is
Grat I cannot in older
that my position Is in euch condition
1 Grat I cannot repay you in your older
day8 ' but borc ls hoping that soirie
day I will so brighter days in. heir*
j
to|. lw , . ... . , . .. .
' f yCU n a boaltb 111 llfe > E:nd G 1 "*
soon we will ba togather and be
happy I suppose Chas and maybe
tag you.
I Alice I a.m proud of youas a sister
'and only hope that th'® letter will
Art is there by now.
I received mother s and y ouïr Fitter
was very;
and also the box which
fine indeed
I am very to hear of Tom Mc
Clanban's death.
Now tat I am away all I can do is
to write a few lines, may they keep
your courage up for my retarding.
I am your loving son and brother ;
Paul
I
WANTED
Plowing to do with
tractor.
Average plowing price $3.00 per acre.
George Wlndfe.
a
3t
1
Ovreland Roadster, in excellent con
dltkm, good tires.
4t
FOR SALE
-
Scott McClanahan.
MW
NUREXFORM
u
!
j
AN IMPROVED "REX
ARSENATE OF LEAD POWDER
»
As a result of the past three years work of Dr. O. C. Hedeaburg,
head of the Rex Research Bureau, the "Rex" Companies are
now manufacturing a New Powdered Arsenate of Lead, sold under
the trade name of "NuRexForm" Arsenate of Lead.
State Experiment Station Men of Ohio, Indiana and Michigan
have seen the product demonstrated, and said in substance, the
following:
if
It is decidedly the best we have
and represents what
will like!} 7 prove to be the best thing, in behalf of Horticulture,
that has been brought out in the
ever seen
♦ *
ft
past 25 years.
GUARANTEE
FINENESS
We guarantee our "NuRexForm"
of Lead to be as pure chemically as Arsenate of
Lead can be made.
Arsenate
Because of the Extreme Finess "NuRexForm
Arsenate of Lead spreads and completely covers
the surface of the fruit and foliage, and when it
dries after spraying, does not crack or draw apart,
and leave exposed portions of the fiuit, where
the Codling Moth may begin feeding.
1
It contains
Arsenic Oxide (poison)
not less than
31 per cent
62 per cent
. 1 per cent
Lead Oxide, about .
Soluble Arsenic, less than
-SUSPENSION
ADHESIVENESS
\
it
NuRexForm" Arsenate of Lead will stay in
suspension for hours without agitation, thus in
suring a more even distribution of the poison
over the sprayed area, than can be accomplished
with the old forms of Arsenate of Lead.
"NuRexForm"
Adhesive qualities which will cause it to stick to
the fruit and foliage, even though the spraying
peration may he followed bv heavy rains.
When Once Drv it i« There to Slav.
♦ '
Arsenate of Lead contains
O
((
ft
NuRexForm
pension, Fineness and Adhesive qualities, insures the fruit grow
ot protection against the ravages of the Codling
Arsenate of Lead, through the Chemical, Sus
ers a maximum
Moth,
It is so constructed that it will leave a perfect film of poison
portion of the fruit and foliage which will give perfect
tection until the film is ruptured by the growth ot the fruit.
on
everv
pro
Authorities on spraying unite in saying that it will be necessary to make no less than four
applications of Arsenate of Lead in 1919 to keep the Codling Moth under control.
Arsenate oi Lead will keep your
With
your help by doing thorough spraying, "NuRexForm
Codling Moth under perfect control.
»
"NuRexForm" does not cost any more than the old forms of Arsenate of Lead.
Please call at our office and let us demonstrate the superior qualities of this lead to
Place your orders now that we may be prepared to supply your requirements.
you.
PAYETTE VALLEY
REX SPRA Y COMPANY
PHONE 94
We sell "Castle Gate" and "Kemmerer No. 5" Coal.

.
system of safety d°posit boxes which
vx wItl wnt by th<1 year a n0ln
^ ya j fee. Every box has its own lock
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR
RENT.,»
recentl ' intsaltad
We
bava
saf ty and privacy. We will be glad
a j ., liy ^ m io explain oar plan.
First National Bank,
;
i
Payette, Idaho.
WANTED
Fresno Scraper would prefer 4 foot.
G o. Mathews. Route 1.
2t
LOST
Black watkr apanla] lost Jain. 10.
F. E. Hurd.
I
f
i FOR SALE
acres im Mid
Small Bgrtstamtial
14 and 6 tenths
1 delton,
housse, deep drilled wtel], finanily or
ohard. No Incumbrance, will take Pay
Idaho.
ette resident property
payment; Price $3500.00. No »ale after
ffafc. mk. OU
enitlal
as
__
G> havta both 1919 Licence plates
their cars by March 1st. The law
ho strictly enforced.
O. E. Bossen, Comply Aseesor.
John T. Jefferis, Sherif of Payiette
County. I
NOTICE TO AUTOMOBILE
OWNERS
| All Automobile owners are adviced
on
3t
For Sale.
One team of mares, harness am.
heavy spring wagon; price $75.00 foi
the outfit. This is a bargain. En
quire at this office, or call on Mrs.
Julia Purkcy, one mile east of Pay
ette.
T.F
FOR GALE.
3 heifer calves 7 months old 2 milk
oows, good team and heavy harness.
J. R. Hetzer, phone 239-w.
It
For Sale: Alfalfa Hay.- Phonle 289-rS

I •-»
V
J. A. Lauer & Brother
UNDERTAKERS and £43ALVf£R
GLENN C. LANDON, Funeral Director and License
embalmer Lady Assistant When Desired
FOR SALE OR RENT IF TAKEN
SOON.
The John Howard
Lead Ox. 45 acres alfalfa, made
-ums per acre last year. 25 aces for
spring crop. 10 aches pasture good
improvements. See, phone
owner, B. C. McClelland, New Ply
mouth,Idaho.
80 acres on
or write
<
Ik
Reason for It.
A millionaire merchant says: "My
success Is probably due to the fact Hint
"t night I store my mind uud during
the day I mind my store."
Browning Holds Record.
The fir -t Browning gun was made by
John M. Browning when he was thir
iceu years old.
I
It was not a machine
l
urn, its may be surmised,
tag invented more successful firearms
than
Mr. Brown
njiy ten other men in history.—
Forum.
FOR SALE: Thoroughbred Silver
laced Wyandotte eggs for hatching
from winter laying bens. $1.00 per 15
•»g».—Mr*. A. «Ma

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