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The Weiser semi-weekly signal. (Weiser, Washington Co., Idaho) 1904-1911, April 08, 1905, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055206/1905-04-08/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Weiser Semi-wee
IGNAL
,
ÏM
TWENTY-THIRD YEAR.
WEISER, WASHINGTON COUNTY, IDAHO, SATURDAY, APRIL 8.1905.
NO.
I
CiilT ill 1 AO
about two
taken in the
Felthouse Bros. safe,
cab driver, telephoned
morning
Yesterday
«■'o'clock a burglar was
act ol orsokiug
the
hid borne to night watchman
from
Kerins that he had just seen
window on the north side of
a man
pry up a
the Pelthoase store and enter. Small
the street from that side
lives across
of the store. Kevins came to the store
I little later and saw a man standing
Kevins asked what
in the side door.
doing and he replied "I work
there and am sleeping here, ' ' then he
was
Lent inside and barred the door.
Kerins was almost ready to be de
iked by the man's composure and
but Small came up and re
tint be had seen the man go
Nevlns then
1«,
Brough the window,
pent to the door and demanded ad
In
aiseipn bnt could get no reply,
he mean time the burglar crawled
lilently into the rear cellar with the
mrpose of escaping by the rear win
low in the alley, which he might have
lone, as Kevins know nothing of this
Bit, But, unfortunately for Mr.
Burglar,he struck a match iu the oel
W to examine bis surroundings and
I faint flicker, passing through a
pek in the boards which cover the
window, caught the eye of other
ies and revealed his intentions
nd whereabouts. When Nevlus
round to that point the unkuowu
•lied from the interior, "I will sur
-.i
came
I
'EMBERS OF STATE ROAD COMMISSION
WILL LEAVE WEISER APRIL 15
TO GO OVER IT.
M the
* road
meeting this week of the
commission in Boise it
that two trips of inspeo
" D 8h all be made at
11 to of the
once. The first
road it is
built
^mett to Marsh,
which would
* nearer route from Emmett to
pgj»Pn*ent connection
"Mounui
**** <md Wheel
*«*«day.
" Isolde,) that
***• should
»II U
ord
with the Thun
u road. Commissioners
sr started on the first
tbe same com
leave Weiser
»ad proceed to Warren for
» Inspecting tbe i
on
Ht
MS
o./te of
We
mm
inte tiu> Big uruek
•"umlasioimra will
1 prell
rut i
Tbs
Nw # tt(4l
* win
Tbe
u A pr il u
LL
Lua jJ
rénder if you will agree not to hit
mo," The officer assented, and the
cracksman made his way to the side
door and opened it and was taken to
jail. A heavy sledge was found in
side and he had, battered the combi
nation of the safe,so that his job will
have to bo continued to get it open.
Can Hot Seek Office.
Lewiston, Ida., March 31.—The
secretary of the interior has handed
down tAi important decision in
a
homestead contest, in which it is held
that a homesteader has no right to
seek a political nomination, which
office will prevent him from maintain
ing his residence on bis homestead.
The case in question is that of
Giles Hayward against E. D. Briggs.
Mr. Briggs is county surveyor and
took up a homestead in the Winches
ter district. Hayward contested, set
ting up that Briggs had not main
tained his residence on the home
stead, and showing that he was county
surveyor of Nez Perce county and as
such made his home in Lewiston.
The local land office decided for
Briggs as did also the commissioners
of the general land office, but the de
cision of the secretary of the interior
reverses both former decisions and
finds in favor ofHayward.
According to the decision -of the
secretary a public official, if h e took
up a homestead after he was elected
to offloe, would have a good excuse
for not making his residence upon the
property while his term lasted, but
that he would have no right to seek a
renomination to have that excuse for
another period of years.
Spcoal Kales.
Conference, Salt Lake City, April
6--7-8-9-, 1906. For the above occa
sion the following rate is authorized
for the sale of round trip tickets to
Salt L ake City, from Weiser, Idaho,
$22.15, tickets limited to continuous
Good returning until April
passage.
15th. J. W. Lapish, Agent, O. S.L.
Ry
Weiser, Idaho, March 20th, 1905.
three will then complete the work of
inspection.
It is possible if this road is
cep ted the survey by Engineer Luck
ill be adopted by the commissioners
in order to expedite the work of con
struction and at the same time save
ac
w
several hundred dollar*.
All the routes of roads asked for
been charted on the oom
have
tobulated state
,ured showing each
mission's map and a
meut bas been prof
propose.! Hue. with tbs distance, a.
Tbe to
Unrated coat and other date.
ated coat of tbe roads |
OU i Um stete'» p/oportb
asked
tal eati
(for is #221,0
U * J,y ' 7W
fur ruad
'opr iatlon
Tb.
* UihO.CH
ii V
MM
44k|fel Ulb
Will be Used
powers
i
u
B** Ü0
lil
IL
L
A
niSSItlâ VIM
has Dim rounD
A
b Vite Vho traded
U. S. flarshal is in Havait
Honolulu, March 21, via. San
Francisco, [April 1—Utah can best
answer the query as to whether one of
the wives of an apostle of the Church
of Jeans Christ of Latter-day Saints
is in hiding at Laie sugar planta
tion, Island of Oahu, Hawaiian is
lands. Laie is 76 miles from Hono
lulu. The Pacific Commercial Ad
vertiser of March 19 printed a story
to this effect, saying: ''There are
likely to be developments down at the
Mormon plantation at Laie, because
the United States government has
been informed that polygamy is being
practiced there, and orders have been
sent to the United States District At
torney from Washington to find out
whether there is any basis for the
statement.
"Incidentally, there is a report
that a polygamous wife of an apostle
who was wanted badly at the time the
senate of the United States was inves
tigating the charges against Reed
Smoot, could be found not a thousand
miles from the waving cane fields of
Laie if anybody interested should be
down therewith a search warrant and
a pair of keen eyes.
"The statemennt is likewise made
not on the authority of Mr. Breokons,
but on unquestionable authority, for
all that the United States district at
torney has already begun his inquiry
in a quiet way and that there will
very probably be most interesting de
velopments in the very near future.
"The charge at present is merely
that the law against polygamy is be
ing violated by the Mormons down at
Laie, and if the law is being disre
garded the might of the federal gov
ernment is to be directed to the
breaking up of the nest of violators.
It goes without saying, moreover,
that the United States will be success
ful because, while the Mormons can
do a great many things without much
question in Utah, where they have a
state government in which the church
influence is supreme, they oannnotdo
those same things in this territory,
nor in any territory where the federal
law is all the law there is for offenders
of their class, and where the law is
enforced without fear or favor.
"The profits from the plantation at
Laie, it is understood, pay all the ex
of running the straightout Mor
chnroh in these islands, and
penses
mon
yield a considerable profit over to be
sent home to President Smith for the
service of the saints in Utah."
Weiser Comerclal club held
Tbe
another enthoslatlo masting Tburs
day evening.
Ed Barton 'reported the results of
tbs comittee to the State
Road Commission in the inter
Mr. Bar
tbe visit of
Wage
eel of tbe Big Creak road.
question but
tun said there was no
the. tb« comm i*
one half of tbe «Ï
M*i. U would b«
i W'W 4**
lOAJ
j Ump w
irtfi ru
.■ j
j
» up by Wm u omm ts a t
M ud* M Marten. *
Tbddbnir ai i-*"
and U
tbhy «s d ni
runts lus an
i
U. 1rs
Lu M
é /«briny
i
MT'/W* 1
<é Ht*» «
•vJ J ■ » • ' • *
«Mb
i .i (
mtf »*''
i
l'a)
l*
r *Mtm**J
» mm
mi uti cask
Ml Story ol a loony Inylish
Did Hade a Yirtim ot
Her Fail
The Salt Lake Tribune says;
A pitiful case of injured innocence
and an attempt to force a young Eng
lish girl into polygamous relations
has been brought to light in this city
within the past few days. The story
as it came from the lips of the girl
herself is revolting in its nature and,
as she said, she was willing to relate
her tale iu the hope that it would be
a warning to other girls who might
ignorantly be led into the shame
which has come to her.
Two years ago last summer," she
said, "my sister sent me the money
to come from England to Salt Lake.
I had joined the Mormon church
about six months before and she
wanted toe to come here. On the
very day that I reached Salt Lake,
both my sister and my brother-in-law
began to use their influence to get me
to go into polygamy with my sister's
husband. I was an innocent English
girl, knowing not half as much of the
things that girls should know, and
which many an American girl know
ft
at the age of ten and twelve years..
"The very night I came to town
my sister and brother-in-law took me
to the theater, and he devoted him
self to me more like a sweetheart
than a brother-in-law. He kept up
his attentions day after day, and
every day both of them kept urging
me to go into polygamy.
any children, and my
They had
never had
brother-in-law told my sister that he
had a revelation that if he could have
a child by me. she would later be
mother, and would secure the
come a
celestial glory for which all good
Saints long.
"There was but one thing in the
way of their desires, and that was
they were not quite sure whether or
not polygamous marriage could be
performed. Whenever any of the
good Saints came to the house, they
taken into'oonfldenoe and told
were
of the wishes of my sister and brother
in-law. Somehow the two had talked
to mé so much abont it that I thought
it must be right, and so was not un
willing to take the step.
"Some of the Saints who were
asked about the matter said that
polygamous marriages were no longer
performed, while others said that my
brother-in-law could take me through
the Temple right here in Salt Lake.
My sister even urged my brother to
take me to some other state and marry
, but he said If he did, be would
have to leave me there, and be didn't
want to do that. All the time.
strange as it may seem, my sister was
wbu most wanted the mar-1
me
the one
rlage. But that,yon know, was
the Mormons have a
he
belief
• bat they will not receive glory in
tbe kingdom unless they bave cb 11
dreu iu ibis world
"This went on for' several months,
Mater and brotbar t« taw both
my
ith
luiim in law ali
any
objecting to my go
ona obre, my
Umr paying aW
„peeking tb* M
gm
Iba
i
tell
loti» wbar» I
of Mg» nrnrt-mp
yov
i ba< 1 »ta «y t
ggd M war
ot 114a Md a
i* *****
'/Afp
i art
à t
f r
11» h>0 t ktar 1
il/ m
IM
«igUrt rité b» k
sbaml juud
4' mum
>'w a
PM
£ P 010100 P&0 ikkf Mté* tiï
ffr
"ip*
leave their home and go into a small
frame bouse, which they rented for
me. At first my brother-in-law paid
the rent and gave me a few dollars a
month to live on. Then he stopped
paying the rent, gave me only about
$1.25 a week, and then even this
small amount was refused.
ANOTHER POLYGAMOUS BISHOP.
''While 1 know all about Bishop
Haskell S. Jolly and his polygamous
marriages," said George S. Crosby
last evening at the Kenyon hotel,
''I will say nothing . You are sim
ply looking for information, and
would use what I told you to injure
Senator Reed Smoot, a man whom I
respect and honor. ' '
According to the information fur
nished by a resident of Salt Lake,
Bishop Jolly was married to Miss
Nellie Harrison,at that time a school
teacher at Mt. Carmel, Utah, in
1897. The ceremony was performed
in Mexico, and later developments
brought out the fact that until the
day of her marriage Miss Harrison
had been engaged to Hod Brown, a
oow-pnnncher. After their return
thipgs began to get warm for the
bishop and his wife, and he moved to
Lovell, Wyo. Now, it is said, he is
living openly with her.
Jessie W. Crosby, father of George
8., mentionned above, is a polygamist.
He is a resident of the Big Horn
country in Wyoming, and but for the
efforts of O. M. Owen of this city
would have been elected a Presiden
tial elector last fall on the Repub
A few moments conver
lican ticket,
sation with the son would convince
any one that he does not believe in
polygamy,and were he to state openly
the things that he hints at, it would
be to dennounce a great many of the
presént day evils which the church
winks at and does not attempt to con
trol, even if it does not encourage.
The Chicago Lady Entertainers at
the opera house April 10.
Club has secured them.
Outlook
LOCATED ON GROUSE CREEK NEAR RE
SORT-WILL BE WORKED EXTEN
SIVELY THIS YEAR.
One of the biggest placer properties
in the whole west, is to be found on
Grouse creek, not far from Resort,
It G the Gott Mining company's pro
I perty of 840 acres, says the Grange
ville Standard. The company re
I ceived its name from the initials of
1 the four original incorporators,
They have done about $22,000 worth
of work during the past year, and are
preparing to doable that amount In
One of their
j development this
■ plans is bo make all -mile canal to
the waters of Secesh week to
year.
carryj
j tW gravel beds, They will bave
liai mites of tble big diteh, which is
eight feet wide on tbe bottom, doue
I test of July,
bave fou/ gteote ready
by tb*
average of «bout
esbaurtuve tests
gravel bads
I 111 tart In dnpib. and
abow an
»44 yield
U1
p» crags
irfeb gUMd
...
.pei A nd (p
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itàm
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VAS UADI TOISDAT
Oter flatters Vill Hart Io I«
Settled Delore Tille (an
be Dim
The sheriffs's sale of the Iron Dyke
properties advertised for an event of
this afternoon, drew quite a crowd of
curious spectators to the court bouse
at 2 o'clock, says Tuesday's Baker
City Herald.
Deputy Sheriff Snow read the
official advertisement and after Its
length had been drawn out, called for
bidders "One hundred thousand dol
lars, " spoke Attorney John L. Rand,
and farther hawking by the auctioneer
was unnecessary as everybody seemed
to be shy of the necessary wherewith
to elevate the bid.
Under the bid, the property pakfead
iu so far as the preheat step is «OB*
oerned, to the plaintiffs in an action
of local historic lore.
Attorney Rozenwig, who was pre
sent asked that all the bill of costs be
at once prepared and presented in or
der that theeame might beliquidated.
On the surface the intention of the
purchasers is to begin at once prepar
ations to do something with the prop
There are, however, other mat
erty.
ters pending in the courts of this
state and Pennsylvania, which will
have to be adjusted before full title
can be vested. One of these in par
ticular point is the action of Mrs.
Florence B. Shatto,who is suing for a
quarter interest in the property and
appurtenances.
Secesh. William Allen and Claude
Wain have a 300-foot tunnel on their
property on the south side of War
Eagle mountain. They report a three
foot ledge of $20 ore. The Florida
company bad a dozen men at work all
last season, and eight men this win
ter, on their property on the north
aide of the same mountain. They
claim to have 40 feet of $12 ore.
Messrs. Kelly A Patterson, of War
ren, have some extremely promising
claims in the same locality,
placer deposit« of that aectlo
little, If anything,short of marvelous.
The Gott company has »tu arras, aad
Ute I .»loose Greaak company
The
I, iii„ n
much, all nf a blob 1« known to oarry
high saines
good planar ground
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