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The Weiser semi-weekly signal. (Weiser, Washington Co., Idaho) 1904-1911, June 14, 1905, Image 1

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THE WEISER SEMI-WEEKLY SIGNAL
SflTTHIRD YEAR.
WEISER, WASHINGTON COUNTY, IDAHO, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 1905.
NO. 83
is Hi; frill W Ttef
Washington correspondence of
ian contains tbe
Portland Oregonian
^Knowing:
president
Roosevelt has hopes of
rtng a good Republican of Senator
In fact, he has several times
U the senior Idaho senator back
o tbe fold, and has assured him he
ild be received in full fellowship
But Dubois,
oon
be choose to return.
Mioly political questions,
auti-ttdmiuifltration
ueeto be an
fbere is one thing, though, that
i itrengthened Dubois with the
«ident— his recent determined
md in support of the administra
hg't forestry policy, and his de
Lot the federal policy of irriga
te, Tbe fact that Senator Hey burn
[working at cross purposes with
ident over forestry questions
umm.'W make Dubois tbe stronger
White House. More than that,
Hipreeident has been informed by
I who know, that tbe forestry pol
o(today is unpopular in Idaho:
U majority of the people are
idely opposed to it, and are fighting
imriKse of creating new reserves,
ht in matters of forestry as in
«matters, the president is sure
krigbt,and hawing that assurance,
ping ahead. Those who are with
tare heartily commended, not so
ich because they support the presi
lt, bat because they support a
(icy that has proven successful,and
working in every western state to
I interest of tbe public and against
» forestry question did not be
i a sharp issue between tbe Idaho
tors until Senator Hey barn filed
the president his strong letter
rötest against the creation of new
rree. He did not cousait his
»gue, but weut ahead indepen
ily. When Senator Dnbois saw
t his colleague had done, he Set
rork to coUeot facts in bis own
**>on, and additional oonflrma
rfacts furnished him by the fores
horeao, and then proceeded to rip
•tor Heyburn'e protest to shreds,
'is the opinion of experienced
ithat Senator Hey burn made a
I grave mistake when he under
k to fight the president on tbe
question. It may be true,
both senators admit it is true,
overwhelming sentiment in
tfa
«today is against the president,
oenator Heyburn to the popular
Bo did Governor Gooding and
Rotative French. But they
a P at an unfortunate time.
* ba< ^ they thrown down the
I * than the president returned
II "«west, had
No
a conference with
inchot, chief of the forestry
D ' &n< k read the letter of Senator
«than he squarely defined his
l °n, and
announced
ata and hie colleagues and fol
tb «y would have
1 Mtter pm,
' "Men big reserves, in face of
protest.
to swal
for be intended to
„ wuators and repre
** republican a* well aa Dem
N «Si u hearty accord
with tbe
rfe " ,rvfe M' ro P
l ""Wed, Will operate tu lbs
J** 4 ' Without tb
i
"sc reserves
.
J* » matt.,
'Wfltnuheiu
t of s few years he
and half a dozen
ii have cleared
Us
UMtgiiih. u u i
F * ke<l bate s«,
F tiAlnts ip
f JfctyMjijj
<oii*u 4 4 Uma
l*t the caat, and
Ui
pllOlei
wne of the prie
he prua!4aid
S in Idaho
m ' PMWtiuna
All
** % ,
L
Ibim* j
m
%
hy hfl
M m
M'fMIA# I
**'*4)1
^ «Hk| | W ( m
. fias sh,, .I
Mf Wl,.( ,
of!.
MUk Êff
Ik üb*
H
i.»>
Mty
r m* i*l*i
1 PM
for a visit. Mr. Pago states he
pleased with the mineral display made
by Idaho. He found it decidedly
the best on the groqnds.
While the state made such a flue
showing in that department, however,
It had nothing to represent two of
groat resources—wool and timber.
n u *
our
There was not a strand of wool
exhibition nor a foot of timber.
Speaking of this deficiency of the
exhibit, Mr. Page narrated that he
fell in with an interesting man at the
Idaho building who wished to secure
information about the state,
showed him the mineral exhibit, ex
plaining'many features of it, and they
OD
He
looked over tbe other highly credita
ble exhibits, the stranger manifesting
great interest. Finally tbe visitor
asked "Do you produce wool in your
state?
Mr. Page told him we did.
Speaking up again, the stranger asked
if there were no timber in Idaho, and
again Mr. Page was obliged to admit
that One of onr great resources had
Y Y
been overlooked in getting up the ex*
bibit.
All other wool states bad fine wool
exhibits, Mr. Page said, and the other
northwestern states bad fine exhibits
of timber and lumber. He said be
was willing to go on record on this
subject iu the hope of arousing dis
cussion that would lead to something
being done to get tbe two industries
represented. There was not room for
much of a timber display, but enough
could be put in to show tbe variety
and quality of our timber, especially
tbe white pine.
.
Ilo Road District in Tfonder.
The Thunder Mountain country is
still without a road district and tbe
commissioners have adjourned until
in July and then if they should see
fit to take this matter up we would
hardly get the road work started until
the first of September, says the Thun
der Mt. News,
our busy season and will only serve
This will come in
to collect this money and what will
get in return? We need the road
repairing now and not next fall.
Our roads need repairing as all other
mountain roads do in the spring and
from the present outlook the only
work they will receive will be from
donations.
we
mi turn
IS AFTER mt m
1
Declares tit »ill Ask for
nation al
The Spokesman-Review publishes
the following: W. E. Borah of Boise.
Idaho, who was defeated by W. B.
Heyburn for the United States senate
1903, announced last night in an
the Hotel Spokane that
he will be a candidate for Senator
Dubois' seat next year. In answer to
in
interview at
„ question he said ;
"1 will be a candidate for the sen
ate. I am going direct to the people, j
in*theprliner?e« and ta thVcounty j
Hnn It will be in the open.
i°have always been in favor of tbe
election of eenators by popolar vote. |
Four year- ago 1 «nH tttu
of • resolution oowrlng »W*
before tbe platform coiumi **
republican Mate convention, U
voted down.
"Jfow, no far as my own *
I« concerned I 1 a* 1 ' going In f
principle of pnpulgg alaM on
far a« Urn praaent conditio
tlon law a Hi parmd,
'V t
Slid id
i;
oudi
Do yoo
HewUy of Un
the
4 a
ft d
> iJi
m m* « »» * Em
**
1 'Ue ha>
( • *j
MiWM
I
i^lidJ Ma
A4MA# i
lilgi g * "
,. v lb-.' -
t, «
/ Aht
■ i> j'»i
.1 Ian
W"'
4
,iiii j
. I
i
iJ
fjUU iiE fi
11
-ili
HI DEADLY EATTLE
M
SIX MEN ARE KILLED IN AN ENCOUNTER
BETWEEN THIEVES AND IDAHO
CATTLE MEN.
Blaokfoot, Idaho, June 12—A bat
tle has occurred in tbe Jackson's
Hole country between cattlemen and
"rustlers" who were driving away a
herd of stolen cattle. Six men are
reported killed, four rustlers and two
cattlemen. Several horses were
10 LOCATE LOST lit
north Part of Countif.
W. H. Myers, of Paonia, Colorado
and Ed Sweaney, of this city, left
Saturday on a prospecting trip in tbe
northern part of the country, says
the Salubria News-Letter.
of '62 Mr. Myers found a rich
In the
year
placer prospect in that section but
driven ont by the Indians, he re
was
turned in '63 but was too late in the
Mr. Myers
season for placer mining,
then made a trip east and when he
returned west stopped in Denver
the Indians were on the war path and
not safe to venture from that
Mr. Myers then made Colo
as
it was
point.
rado his home engaging in business
several places finally settling at
Paonia, the greatest fruit belt in the
world, where he engaged extensively
at
Selling his ranch a
in ranching,
few years ago
again felt the gold fever tingling in
to Idaho to look
this veteran prospector
bis veins and came
his long hidden bonanza, but ow
ing to the many changes of tbe ooun
his early visit he was baffled
Failure only whetted
up
try since
iu hi8 8 earch.
hig ambition to succeed and he made
^ more frui ties8 trips.
u8 that this will be his last
a8 fae
attempt to locate me *o B
is getting too old for the hardship, o
tfae bUlg and if be does not find the
llow Bau d bed this trip he will give
fea j, cer tain that his efforts
j » P • orowned wMfc BUCC ess
j a8 hl . tbwe prevlon. trip, bare'«erred
re vlve bis memory and be now
Mr. Myers
^ ^ ^ ca „ g0 to t be exact spot
| ^ ^ feurë ^ 0 .
|)n Ronton tyji Co,
•Tb* W
sru
10.
June
tiompacy ffl"d artl
I with the count
ill Lake,
t Idaho Huger
t
Idea of
cl era
, ni'ill j Ol
corporation
slimitm of
cent
Thia
t • <J
liMld espil
( Ml
iMU
lue
11,1
.,1
j
{
ii*
IH
I
j i||
ssi*
i lui ..
in i
n|(P
John
tuiki 1 # ."ï
(Ittil J
Wl
killed during tbe fight,five being shot
down in one place. The ranchers
recovered their cattle. The rustlers
were beaded for the nearest railroad
point with 90 head of stolen cattle
when overtaken by a force of cattle
men and a running fight for 60 miles
took place.
mm\m Vfll PLEASED
Ear M ot Ms tor Alfalfa
14.000 Acres kenlli to
sa
«ted Hear (ambridçe.
"Almost all of the land in Middle
valley, near Cambridge, has now been
homesteaded, or soripped, and largely
by people from Umatilla county,"
said C. H. Carter this morning. Mr.
Carter has just returned from Idaho,
where he went last week with a party
consisting of J. H. Raley,C. J. Smith,
William Atchison and C. J. Whita
The last two men already haa
ker.
possession there, and the others went
for the purpose of seeing the country
with a view to purchasing land.
According to Mr. Carter, the bot
tom land through the center of the
valley, which makes a strip several
iles wide and about 25 long, is very
tu
fertile and is far ahead of any land
this section for raising such crops as
Immense crops of hay are
iu
alfalfa.
raised ther*>, but owing to the poor
market only $4 or 85 a ton is secured
This land is now valued at
fop it.
about 850 per acre and if it were in
this county it would be worth 8200
per acre, in Mr. Carter's opinion.
Thus far the bottom land is all that
i an d.
pu t in, however,
Among tbe Umatilla county people
-bo have taken land in tbe viciait*
of Cambridge, are
ker . Wiliiam Atchison. Harvey 1 le -
has been cultivated in that valley,
^ tbe land that is now being taken
has formerly been used as range. It
is rolling land, and according to Mr.
Carter and others who have seen it,
will undoubtedly make good wheat
No wheat crops have yet been
HU
Dr. C. J. Wbita
««rdson. of Athena.
Stanton of Helix, Jesse Moore and
Mr. Heed of Adams. Messrs. Hwisber
and Johnson of Adams, and George
dtuger, formerly in ps
d Plat/ueder her*
is now In the sheep lx
ersbtp with
Mr. Min
• I

I 'l ju f
l|M tli*
l**r
who
lo taking the new lan
list r.-f right# has
others hst
liUV4l
I hem. while the
tl*a l#nd with awrlp
• rnatwnteeu
wmwUdy #•
Lu sus
b êMmbi
j ^ *
{ p*n.
I ii
ttMtJ AkiM*
«
ii^i Upué uaa! Iimu
4m *0 M
A I « »>
lugt nd
Mi dhee 8
I# flea
g the dh
(ghah- *'
4 Attain
« i.
ii
hitwMh W hd W g*tw •
* hat 4At MMihlf f dig# gt#
0 mm v
aa li ill#
|#>ii#l p Alaé# lut
mPm
étaM W#«'
it
ft f
only saw a small portion of Uncle
Sam's domain around Cambridge.
About 14,000 acres have been taken
up within the last couple of months,
but this is only a commencement.
It Is true that there are no more tracts
where so many adjoining homesteads
can be gotten, but there is still room
for hundreds of settlers in this neigh
borhood, and on laud that is superior
in many respects to that which has
recently been taken.—Cambridge
îîewB.
A paragraph is going the rounds
showing that we once whipped the
Japanese. It reminds us that on June
24, 1863, Japan announced the porte
opened by treaties, and latter some
English, French and American ves
sels bombarded the Japanese forts
and vessels. A western newpaper had
exhumed this episode in connection
with the affair. The American force
was commanded by Davis S. Mo
Dougal and oonisted of the Wyoming,
a Second class 20*ton sloop carrying
six guns. The Japanese had three
converted merchantmens, mounting
20 guns, which were aided by seven
land forts with 3 guns. The action
was brief, lasting only one hour. "At
the end of the engagement the Japan
did not have any warship left and
the seven forts were silenced.
Wyoming was slightly injured, but
still in the ring. Probably most
newspaper readers are unaware that
the United States once fought a naval
battle in which the Japanese were
ese
The
net victors."—Ex.
Court is in Session.
The June term of district court for
the Seventh judicial district convened
in this city Monday with Jndge Frank
J. Smith presiding. The calendar
is a small on and it was not consid
ered necessary to summon a jury.
The criminal cases on the docket are:
State of Idaho vs. Ren wain and
Frank Turner. Remittitur from su
preme court.
State of Idaho vs. J. W. Lawrence,
charge of burglary.
State of Idaho vs. Marshall Ham
mock, charge of assault with intent
to commit murder.
Several civil cases will also be dis
posed of.
OffIClALS
conmti
Hut
They Tell a leviston Han
P. and I. It. Will
Mr. W. F. Ketteubaoh, a Lewiston
gentleman, recently visited Portland
in company with a party of high O.
R. & N. officials. On the trip the
officials got communication with Mr.
Ketteubaoh and on bis return to Lew
iston, he gave the Tribune some of
tbe secrets which the O. R- & N. men
had told him, which included the
building of a line from Klparia to
Lewiston and the extension of the P.
& X. N. to connect—and O. B. à N.
officials ought to know what is going
Tbe Tribune says:
to happen.
"In speaking of tbe railroad con
struction in the Lewiston country,"
continued Mr. Ketteubaoh, "it was
the general belief of tbe O. R- À N.
party that tbe contract for tbe Lew
istun iilpsria line will lie awarded
wltbiu tbe next 30 days.
[stated that tbe P. 4 l- N.
extended from Council to Ix»w
ju tract on the ixswiston
It was also
alated
to ha
ieton.
K I Plan
4 UUUt
T)„
Hue has been held up on ae
•liiusid
iluolari»
>1 the
.„I
Engineer I fr o s c hle
lous that ail am y
>
iug
Am
efoll
fl
ad
ijufi
Tit* r«a»d 1# *1«
it mud
>y§
iii 1,^4.
/ A> A j
Ml JiU#'
• a
i
>l'i hk t
iwO M
sum A
(
huai ot
I
iKi*A<4
-*i >l>
■ I
\mêm0 .»
Vu# gu# i
slw
or «mû m doad
ot its Advantages Over
Sorter» Ponte.
The State Commission has decided
to take up the northern route into Big
creek from Warren,
While this route
might not meet with the approval of
some of our citizens it will be so
much toward opening up this great
mining district, says the Thunder Mt.
News. The road has been promised
the condition the citizens of that
on
district pay half and the state one
half of the expense. This, they no
doubt will do ae it is to their interest.
The route of the proposed road
leads southwesterly from Warren up
Warren creek to its bead, over the
summit to Pony creek, down that
stream to the south fork of the Sal
mon, op the south fork to Elk creek
and up that stream to the Elk crdèk
summit, then dropping down to the
Werdenbbff mine on Big creek,
Bids
will be called for at once, the idea
being to have construction work be
gun on June 25.
If this road is completed by fall to
the Werdenhoff mine they will readily
that it will be necessary to ex
see
tend it on to Roosevelt in order to get
This northern route would
our trade
not only prove a revenue to tbe peo
ple in that section but will be an ac
commodation to a great many here
who are compelled to travel this route.
(That means everybody—Signal Ed. )
If a person goes tbe southern rente
iu the winter time they are compelled
to go down through parts of Oregon
and Washington before they reach
the county seat,
Think of how many
days and how many
miles they travel to reach this point?
The people In Orangeville have no
interest in ns any more than to Col
lect their share of the taxes and make
humble servants for a lot of high
hundreds of
UB
W hot have
salaried county officials.
received from the county in return ,
for our support? The privilege of
casting a vote
officials.
we
to support these
Russian losses.
The Tokio correpondent of the
Daily Telegraph says there were ladies
board the hospital ships captured
by the Japanese, including Vice Ad
iral Rojestvensky's niece, who asked
permission to nurse her uncle.
The correspondent says that the to
tal Russian casualties in the naval
on
m
battle were 14,000 perished and 4,600
captured, while 3,000 escaped,
adds that a large percentage of the
prisoners are suffering from disease.
He
iiwsil) Btçtols towel toes.
Moscow, June 9.—The board of re
gents of tbe Unlveristy of Idaho ad
journed tonight after being in session
for two days . Much business was
transacted. A site for the metallur
gical building was selected across tbe
which
street north of the campm
will lie a< quired at the nominal price
In effort will he mads to
of 8)360
complete the building this
estimates toi
i ha
year,
unite)
depart
amounting to pTDtlo, for neat
..11
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of Urn athletic held
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