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Jerome County times. (Jerome, Idaho) 1919-1920, February 12, 1920, Image 2

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FAvuRwODIHCATION
OF DEMAND 01 HUN
ALLIES MAY ABANDON IDEA
OF FORCING HOLLAND TO
SURRENDER KAISER.
New Note Being Prepared by Lloyd
George Will Appeal to Sense of
Fair Play of Government to
Surrender Arch-Criminal.
London.—It Is generally believed
here that the allies have abandoned the j
Idea of forcing Holland, by economic
pressure or blockade, to surrender the
former emperor for trial by the allies.
It also seems that England will con
sent to a modulation of the list of
those who were to bo surrendered by
the German government for trial for
alleged crimes committed during the j
war. Baron Birkenhead, lord chan
cellor of England, Is understood to
have made It clear the British govern
ment favored a radical modification
of the list In order that an agreement
with Ueremnny might be reached.
Premier Millernnd declared In the
Chamber of deputies on Saturday that
the allies would not evacuate the left
bank of the Rhine until Germany had
fulfilled all the terms of the Versailles
treaty.
A new note Is being drafted by Pre
mier Lloyd George for presentation to
Holland.
will simply appeal to the sense of fair
play of the Dutch government to sur
render the person of the arch-criminal.
Astonishment has been caused in
French circles by a change of attitude
on the part of the British government
regarding the extradition of Germans
accused of violation of the laws of
It Is understood that
litis
wa r.
While it was understood that Great
Brltalu was the most Insistent of all
powers represented at the peace con
ference in demanding the trial of for
mer Emperor William and other promi
nent Germans, information has been
received that the British are now show
ing a tendency to leave the initiative
in the process of extradition to others. !
Berlin.—A secret meeting of army |
and navy leaders a month age. in an- |
tlcipatlou of the allies' demand fur |
extraditions of those guilty of war
crimes, compiled a sot of regulations I
for common action. These instructions.
WAR CRIMNALS' AGREEMENT.
Decide to Stand Together and Fight
Extradition for Crimes.
which ure signed by Generals von !
Heeringen, Von Kluck and Falken- !
hayn, as well us others, declare that
it Is a violation of honor for one to
place himself outside the pule of selz
ure by his own government or the
entente. Therefore, they must refuse
to surrender, refuse to recognize the
legality of a foreign court und do noth
ing In the shape of personal defense,
or otherwise acknowledge such court,
but make the following common decla
ration, in the Gorman language;
"I have merely done my duty ns a
German soldier. As such I refuse to
recognize a foreign court, and also de
dine to make any further statement."
HUGE FUND FOR IRRIGATION
6*cretary Lane Would Increase Appro
priation to $12,873,000.
Washington. — Secretary Lane on
February 7 asked congress to Increase
appropriations for work on irrigation
projects next year front $1,873,000 to
$12,878,000. The secretary said I'resi
dent Wilson bad approved the esti
mated expenditures.
Nineteen irrigation projects in Ari
xona, Colorado. Idaho, Montana, North
and South Dakota, Nebraska, Wyom
ing. Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Cali
fornia and Washington would receive
Increased funds, permitting greater de
velopment work.
LANE'S RESIGNATION ACCEPTED
Secretary of Interior Will Quit on
March 1.
Washington.—President Wilson has
accepted, effective March 1, the resig
nation of Franklin K. Lane, for nearly
seven years secretary of the interior.
The necessity that, after twenty-one
years of public life, lie must "think of
other duties," was the reason assigned
by Mr, Lane tor his withdrawal, and,
in reply, Mr. Wilson wrote his luipe
"that your future career will lie as
full of honorable success as your past."
Fear Revolution In Greece.
Vienna.— Revolution In Greece is
forecast by Elio Panas, former Greek
minister of foreign affairs, in an in
terview published in the Giornale
d'ltalla.
resignation of Premier Venlzdos and
the return of Former King Constan
Ine, he says.
The only alternative is the
Death Rate Highest In 1918.
Washington. — The highest «ieath
rate on record in the United States
census bureau. 18 per lots) population
was recorded In 1018, according to a
. ,, , . „ ' _" R ' ,
bulletin issued Saturday. The total
was 1,471,367 deaths.
Senator Johnson Flu Victim.
Washington.—Senator Hiram John
son of California Is ill at his home
here from Influenza, it has been
learned. The senator has been con
flned to his bed, but it is not believed
his condition is serious.
/
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raKEWEh Address
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KnliliE WASHINGTON'S
Farewell Address bulked
large in the uatlon-wlde
discussion of tlte peace
treaty anil the league of
nations. Four American
state documents figured
with Increasing regularity
in tlte debate lu the sen
ate and in tb. thousand
and one pubbe speeches
and published articles :
tlte Declaration of Inde
pendence. the Constitution. Washington's Farewell
Address and tlte Monroe Doctrine,
where by everybody,
warning against
Gr
The Farewell A<l<lre
s was use«! iit a lest every*
Both sides used it. Those
who opposed the treaty made use of it us a solemn
"entangling foreign alliances"—
the present-day equivalent uf Washington's phrase,
"permanent alliances with any portion of the for
elgn world." Those favoring the treaty argued
that Washington's political wisdom was of his day
only, and that his teachings are out of date;
that while Washington was good and noble he
unlearned in the science of government aud
trained in the arts of statecraft,
The events leading up to the Farewell Address
are briefly as follows: The constitutional
ventlon met In May In Philadelphia. After four
months of secret deliberations the Constitution
was completed and offered to the Individua 1 " staXs
for adoption. Nine states were
Hampshire made the ninth,
went info effect June 21, 17SS.
was
un
Those w ho adhered to the policy of the Farewell
Address also upheld the Monroe Doctrine, holding
the latter to be the development and outgrowth of
the former.
con
necessary ; New
The Constitution
George Washing
ton was elected the first president of the L'nlted
States and served two terms,
dined a third term and established th
for but one re-election.
1T%0-1TÖG.
He lie
e (irecedeut
If Washington accepted the presidency
luctance it was
with re
with pronounced distaste
yielded to what he thought was his duty and took
the office for a second terra.
Ana It proved to be
a stormy term. In 1703 France declared
England and Inouïs X\ I was beheaded In F
by the revolutionists.
wa r on
ranoe
represent
tiere an«l
frenzv
"Citizen" Genet,
revolutionists,
American people
Washington Issued u n
a storm of
Oenefs activities résulté«! In his
In the meantime Great liritain
poning the surrentier of British
west, taking American
ships under the pretext that
and so ncting (jenernlly that
American people clamore*!
British.
ing the French
stirred the
arrived
to
of
*-u
sympathy with France,
trality proclamation which
popular protest,
recall.
a rouse« I
was post- •
posts In the Nortii
t rorn
sailors
American
Britons
part «if the
t lie
they were
si large
f«»r war
succeeilci)
Britain,
Thus he
j
against
Washington finally
gotiating a treaty with Great
part correcte«! these evils,
both In maintaining neutruilty
in spite of «liseor«! in his cabinet tin«!
sentiment in the nation. And It
heart that he wrote that part of his Fare
dress to the Ainerlcnn people.
In
ne
which
in
succeeded
and averting
war.
division of
was with a full
-w.-ll A«l
Septernher 17. 17DG
ns his retirement from the presidency approached
That his heart was full is shown by the
from the address :
se words
"In offering to you, my countrymen,
sels of an old an«l affectionate friemi.
hope they will make the strong
these
«•«>u n
I »hire not
and lasting
that they will control
1 the usual current of the passions or prevent
! Pression that I could wish
i III
our
nation from running the course which has hlthert«>
marked the destiny of nations,
flatter myself that they may he
some partial benefit, some occasional
they may n«»w and then recur
But If I
may even
prodm-t i ve
of
g«*«** I—that
to moilerntc
t lie
fury of party spirit, to warn against the misehiefs
of foreign intrigue, to guard
against
the
postures of pretemied patriotism—this hope
be a full recompense for the
welfare by which they have he«-n «Itctate«!."
Im
wlll
your
„... , ., _
ThV PaFt ° f * he harenelt A«ldres„ most used, of
T.T' nü"" th °7 Paragraphs
which bear on foreign relations of
Sta ^ s . These parnKraphs were
Congressional Record as follows
casions :
"Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence
(I conjure you to believe me, fellow citizens) the
jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly
awake, since history and experience prove that
foreign influence is one of the most baneful foe.«
of republican government. ...
lolieitude f«»r
toward Its close.
the trniteii
read Into the
on several oc
I,
■ yy .
m
J
s
i ,
-V
I
¥
;
•t
iv
i
: i
u
r;
>■<
V
'F'ZFJrATfZifT
"The great rule of conduet for us In regard
to foreign nations Is In extending our commercial
relations to have with them as little political con
nection as possible.
formed engagements let them be fulfllled with
(Krrfect good faith.
So far as we have already
Here let us stop.
"Europe has a set of primary Interests which
to us have none or a very remote relation. Hence
she must be engaged In frequent controversies,
the causes of which are essentially foreign to our
concerns. Hence, therefore, It roust be unwise In
us to Implicate ourselves by artificial ties in the
ordinary vicissitudes of her politics or the ordi
nary combinations and collisions of her friend
ships or enmities.
"Our detached and distant situation Invites and
enables us to pursue a different course. If we
remain one people, under an efficient government,
the period Is not far off when vve may defy ma
terial injury from external annoyance; when we
may take such an attitude as will cause the neu
trality we may nt any time resolve upon to lie
scrupulously respected ; when belligerent nations,
under the impossibility of making acquisitions
upon us, will not lightly hazard the giving
provocation: when we may choose peace or war,
as our interesl. guided by Justice, shall counsel.
"Why forego the advantages of so peculiar n
situation? Why quit our own to stand upon for
eign ground? Why, by Interweaving our destiny
with that of nny part of Europe, entangle
peace anil prosperity In the tolls of European am
bition, rivnlshlp. Interest, humor or caprice?
"It is our true policy to steer clear of perma
nent alliances with any portion of the foreign
world. . . .
us
our
"Taking «dire always to keep ourselves hv suit
able establishments on a resfiecinhle
posture, we limy safely trust to Icmpornry al
liances for extraordinary emergencies.
defensive
"Harmony, lib* nil Intercourse with all
ore recommended by policy, humanity
est.
nations
ami inter
But even our coiiina-r* ial policy should hold
an equal and Impartial hand, neither seeking nor
grunting exclusive favors or preferences ;
constantly keeping in view that it is folly | n one
nation to look for disinterested favors from
oilier; that it most (my with a portion of Us In
dependence fop whatever It may accept un "er that
character; Hint by such iiccepliiu«'«. It
itself In Hie condition of having given
for nominal favors, and yet of being
with Ingratitude for not giving
he nu greater error than fo
ati
may place
equivalents
I eproitehed
There can
more.
expect
upon real favors from mill in lo nalloa.
or calculate
Illusion which experience must cure, which a "just
pride ought to discard."
'1 lie Monroe D«>etrlne dales from a declaration
December 2, 1823, by President James Mo,
in his seventh annual message to congresa
Holy Alliance, formed | M (sir, |,y Russia
and Prussia,
in my
»
The
A iiHtr'a
was threatening to help
cover control of .South America.
United Stules were In
elite coast boundaries.
Doctrine Is In Hu
■ s paln re
Russia and Hi*,
controversy over Hie p„
The mil, of th«, m
two paragraphs;
"In the discussions to which Ibis Ini*
Russian controversy) inis given rise.
'•nroe
(tin;
arrmigemeiiUi by whirl» tln*y muy Ic-ri.iïi»». t^ '
the
tlon for tlte purpose of oppressing them, or con
trolling in any other manner, their des Iny. b> any
Euro[ieatt (tower. In any other light I inn ns o
manifestation of an unfriendly disposition toward
tlie United States . . .
the Farewell Address In
The prominence given
fids public discussion of the treaty should, bow
Examination of American
ever, surprise no one.
state papers shows that Washington's policy has |
figured largely in ninny (>erlo<ls of our history and
often in connection with Ihe Monroe Doctrine.
President Grover Cleveland said;
"It is the policy of peace suitable to our In
terests. It Is the only policy of Monme and of
Washington and Jefferson: "Peace, commerce, and i
honest friendship with all nations; entangling «I- j
liance with none."
I
President Wilson was in full accord with
Grover Cleveland—that there was no change of
conditions Justifying our abandonment of the .
policy of "non-intervention" when, in his spe**ch
In Washington, on May Id, 1014. he said nt Ihe
dedication of the monument of Commodore John
Barry :
"Tiler*, are Just ns vital things stirring now Hint
concern the existence of the nation as were stir
ring then—to wit. In Washington's lime—and
every man who worthily stands in Mils presence
should examine himself and see whether lie has
the full conception of what It means. America
should live her own life. Washington saw II
when lie wrote his Farewell Address."
In lids iiiitloii-wlde debate George Washington
has received many an eloquent appreciation. One
of the finest \\ il s contained In an address by Sen
ator Borah of Idaho on tin- trimly In the senate
In November of Bill*, lie said, among other
things ;
"U hat Is the tes
formation of theories,
and incontrovertible t rut lis, or Is it Hie capacity
ami Hie power I*
•hing called liberty, that vital and indispensable
thing In human happiness called free Institution«
and io establish over all and above all the blessed
and eternal reign of order and law?
of statesmanship? Is It Ihe
Hie utterance of abstract
give to a people Hint concrete
"II this he Hie
where shall we flntl an
• inline Is entitled to he written hindilc
III., name of Washington? Ills Judgment and poise
in the hour of turmoil ami peril. Ids «'mirage and
Iverslty, Ids firm grasp
fundamental principles, his almost Inspired power
lo peiietrule the future mid ..I there Ihe result,
Ihi- effect of policies, have never been excelled If i
equaled, by any of the world's commonwealth
builders.
test.
•iHier who
vision in Hines <>f
.f
"It. fleet for a
lie led tl
was Hu* v*
liniment over Ills achievements
he Revolutionary Army to victory. Ho
ry first to suggest n Union Instead of a
confederacy, lie presided over
wisdom the
iiimI rounRuled with
which framed the
«rent
■ convention
II*- guided the
t'oiislltulion.
s government through
gave dignity and sta
was looked ii(mui
as his own .. ,,n ""." K -*l- , 1m«f. and finally.
he ou .d ess f l """ ,,,,rM '" l,,r -""'rib,.Hon to
i , , * . countrymen and to Hie
of the Hepuhli... he gave llM
h'.v, iiialer which
lis first perilous
hlllty and honor t
by Hie world us
He
years.
that which
cause
grent foreign (ad
< have live,) „„,( prosiiered mid
nearly
strengthened for
.
'••nliiry and u half."
been
has
occasion
proper for asserting,
principle in which the rights |
.f the United
States are involved, that the
by the
and Independent condl
tblch they have assumed .
us
ilul interests
American
tlon
and maintain, tire henceforth ,
tie considered as sub- |
for future colonization i
not t<
J*H*tS
»my Kurop«*an powern.
"With the existing colonies
of any Eu
by
or dependencies
rer
(Spain)
not Interfered and shall
But with the
» e
!>•
roped l>
have L
not Interfere,
governments
dared their Independence and
maintained It. and whose In
dependence we have, on great
consideration
principles.
could not view an lnteM>osl
de
hn ve
who
Just
and on
acknowledged.
w<*
SCORE PERIS« «
HOSTELRY blaze
SAN
FRANCISCO
HOTEL THE SCENE
APARTMENT
OF F A R I v
morning tragedy.
At Least Score f
Trapped by Flames,
Are Taken to Hospital
ing From Injuries
Meet Death
When
While M
any
» Suffer.
Sim Francisco. An uti
her of
from
known
IMIUI*
ptiHons
"eiity to double that
perished in a fire which
morning swept
mem hotel.
Tiollsly
number
'•"Hy .. „y
Berk sin re
the
The it a mb
a pin t
er lll:i \
be kiiu
n»«* thunks
n
Hr.* In*!it
Ihn tliii*iI
n«M.i
lo have originated
of the hotel, a fj e
the dowm
story strii.-iui.
n fUv.fighllng appm.,
Ml
was cuIUmI to iho
Tlte flames ale their way »
rapidity mill the
that I he work of >
■ut
ruins wer.'
•arehlng f.
Fir. : i
front searching ;
were at le. 1-1
ties on that rim
III.I
was necessarily
ing down
floor said there
five lioi
About
bird
"
lui iity flvi'
f»i*r»ion*.
Will
•*tt. were rescued at vit
o.' the fire
fering from
ini. i
ml sent to ho
sj.is
burns of more ■
The hotel
V»Tit>
«aill In
NV ;ih
bout lOO ocelli
Ills,
Two
persons
ere brought ,,
the building alive, after be i,
'It U I wo hours, during whi. I
fire bail reaebed
" ere hurried to a hospital
IIS
FARMER FINDS BURIED SIL.ER
Idahoan Makes Accidental
of Robber's Boned Loot
Twin Falls. Idaho
D'vcove,,
Might si i
of silver bullion, represHi
dental discovery <>f
i f 111 i;
Iml
lo he r«ihhcr>' buried l.se
1*1 •
of old Slug....
hill ho. have been depnsl
hank to if ■ « redit et tv
farmer nt Uogersi.n.
The dis.-,
while
htisenicnl
four below
Tile \
ulscent
ed ;n
|
.
V Si I
mud.
\\ Vi'S
hi* f
M|1
Ir
Will
till 1
ilue .
dcIiTlillmsl.
,
|
i
ground.
Fatal Auto Açctacrt
Si» 11 1 .« k«* F 1 1 n
Mrs M
Mrs. Louise 1! I....,
Mrs Stella i 'lark are in .
.loi..i,. iiii.I Ml-- Satin i «Im
is .lead
injuries
Iil< h may |- r:
< a result of ill
hen ihe car in
• aine
were riding
driven by
until
was hit b) ■ i
Lieut. William I
\\
pcently
naval recruiting station
attached
Daniels Concludes Test.rror.,
Washington. < 'oneludkig n -
Illony before Ihe
t,e Investigating naval
•«•retary
that n wide dllTerein e of opr .
ed between himself m l Ue,.r V
S ins during the w ir . . 'lie a ■
Daniels
awards, .*
.,f f,>i,*|gn li.inors
A inert -,
ne 1 decora'
naval officers
Klll> / venly eiglit members of lie
n , q,,. steamship Prince««?. Am., .i
P»i«nger| Have Cloie Cali
n.-vv York. Thirty-two
(Mss. I,
ff... k:, ' .
sandbar
stranded on a
point Thursday night »Idle hound :
Norfolk, Va., to this city
Saturday.
«tided
V ige Negotiations Dragging
Washington,
Hâtions between
lilacs and représenta lives of
million union railroad
Wage
liter..:
1 1 |rector
I
promise to extend for some
IM.«I BeOT.ll
remain Io he consider.
Is anders
"imiM.ri.i
f ereil* ■«•«"
Rail Guarantee Pe« - Cent Ford.
Washington. A return of
on Ihe
aggregate
cent
railroads would he gimmntced
government for u iwrlisl of •»•■
under mi
•ii.h-d l.
igreenn-n»
senate and house
railroad bill.
i-onfereii«
Militia to Guard Murderer
Ky. Three
Lexington.
armed militiamen with
ut..malic rifles
court house
in
will
gin i '
anil
Fayette county
Ham Lockett, negro, goes on '
the murder of id-year old ' l.-n-e
,i-ii W I
II d
i iiii ii .
Hoover Not a Candidate
Herbert Hoove
York.
sued n statement defining Id'
Ne
Il e
toward ihe presidency
nlldll" '
Hull lie is imt ••
nomination ami ihm no one
lz«s| to sp«.|ik f"t hi:
■ai
ill 1 1 ■ • r
polill
Started
I. W. W. Murder Trials
Montesa II«I. Wash.—
many In the trial of
Industrial Workers
charged with Warren
«1er In the Cenirnlia
shooting, began her*
Taking of
alleged
eleven
Hie
O Griinn
Armistice
. Monday
World,
of
i*«i n"> r
Streets.
Flame Throwers to Clean
flam*'
thrower*.
New York.—Army
who have hud a brief bal I'"
In routing Germans from
,,,,? .|IM*
tlM'ir
career
dugoilts an*l trem lies
front, will be us«*l t<>
of New York, snowhoua l >" r
,,stern
the «
the sired*
• lay*.
on
dran

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