OCR Interpretation


The Twice-a-week Twin Falls times. (Twin Falls, Idaho) 1916-1918, May 22, 1917, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055261/1917-05-22/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE TWICE- A-WEEK
* H
Twin Falls Times
Anything That Is For Sale Can
Be Sold Through A Times
Want Ad
SLIGHTLY CLOUDY TONIGHT
AND WEDNESDAY
% —
-
VOL. XII, No. 65.
TWIN FALLS, IDAHO
TUESDAY, MAY 22. 1017.
HIGH COST THE
SEATTLE MAN EXPLAINS NECES
SITY FOR ACTION OF SOUTHERN
IDAHO CONVENTION HERE.
SAYS COST OF MATERIAL FROM
ISO TO GOO PER CENT HIGHER
Twin Falls Plants Both Modem and
Praises City, Its
Progressive
Hotels, People, Public Buildings and
'Ik
'
Public Spirit.
"The lauudrymen are practically the
only people who have not raised prices
materially as a result of the increased
cost in labor and material," said E.
L. Moore, of Seattle, who represents
manufacturing concern,
a machine
yesterday, "so I am sure that the peo
ple will readily understand the justice
of the action, of the Southern Idaho
Laundry Owners association at their
two day session here in deciding to
raise in the cost of
work, particularly when they learn
that a large part of the work turned
out for hotels and families has actu
ally been done at a loss. The laundry
cheerful set of fellows and
inclined to share the greater part
make a slight
men are a
seem. SS
of the loss that now exists but they
cannot bear as much ot it as they have
been doing. All the material used.
such as soap, starch, bluing and cot
ton goods that are used in the work
have gone up from 150 to 600 per cent
since the war began and a small raise
in price has become imperative. It
should also be recalled that the wage
has been increased and the hours of
labor shortened.
"Practically every laundry repre
sented at the meeting here is equipped
with the latest and best machinery
and uses modern methods of produc
ing laundry work.
t "It is almost impossible to equip
even a small plant today without the
expenditure of from $8,000 to $15,000.
- The two laundries in this city are
and in as modern
equipped as well
manner as any to be found in any part
They
of the country, east or west.
the latest machinery to produce
use
work in the most expeditious way and
with the least wear to the articles of
their patrons.
"The visitors were taken for a drive
.around Twin Falls and out to the
Vlreal Shoshone falls and enjoyed
everything very much. I want to join
them in expressing pleasure at the
hospitality of the people of the city.
"All appreciated the words of hearty
speech of Mayor
in the
welcome
Bracken in turning over the keys of
the city to all of us.
"The banquet, was fine, the treat
ment and accommodations furnished
by the hotels could not he excelled
The local laundrymen and
anywhere,
their wives proved experts in the way
of entertainers. We all thought the
city and surrounding beautiful and ad
mired your public spirit and your
public buildings. Everyone I heard
express an opinion desired to come
here to hold another convention.
It is understood that a raise on
some articles of laundry will go into
effect June 1, and the rest later. The
schedule has not yet been announced.
Names of those attending the meet
were;
Allied Trades;
R. L. Bird, Omaha.
Ed. L. Moore, Seattle.
J. T. Snelson, San Francisco.
W. G. Mackler, Rupert, Idaho.
S. M. Walton, Salt Lake.
Geo. L. Longfellow, Denver, Colo.
Association Members:
H. J. Allen, Boise.
R. W. Turner, Burley.
E. J. Murray, Twin Falls.
F. M. Watts, Twin Falls.
G. E. Campbell, Gooding.
E. A. McKay, Emmett.
W. A. Wilson, Idaho Falls.
M. E. Tolliver, Idaho Falls.
Bert Tolliver, St. Anthony.
SH. J. Rich, Pocatello.
W. W. Davis, Blackfoot.
E. L. Wheeler, Caldwell.
W. W. Pearls. Twin Falls.
L. L. Gray, Nampa.
J. G. Gray, Boise.
T. J. Fisher, Welser.
L. Henkes. American Falls.
J. R. Mitchell, Rupert.
Ladies Present;
Mesdames E. J. Murray, Twin Falls.
E. A. Wheeler, Caldwell.
Kate D. Kerr, Boise.
M. E. Tolliver, Idaho Falls.
Wm. Pearls. Twin Falls.
L. L. Gray, Nampa.
J. G. Gray, Boise.
Wm. Christensen.
Miss E. Wheeler, American Falls.
MEXICO SAID TO HAVE
SENT KAISER A PROTEST
(United Press)
'* LONDON. May 22—Mexico has for
mally protested against unrestricted
submarine warfare by Germany, ac
cording to an Exchange Telegram dis
patch The Mexican minister in Ber
lin conferred with the German foreign
office yesterday.
ClEAK DAY IS
NO OTHER DATE SET FOR THE
REASON THAT IT IS DEEMED
UNNECESSARY
MOVE MADE TO ANNUL THE EN
G1NEER KELSEY PLAN
Chairman Channel Busy On Water
Conditions—Landless Park Consid
ered Hardly Feasible—Much Small
Business Transacted.
The city council last night deter
mined to call off the clean-up day set
lor June 5, on account of the presi
dential proclamation of registration
day, and the gubernatorial proclama
tion of a legal holiday on that occa
sion. No other date was set, as it is
thought that the city is already very
clean. Another important action was
the instruction to City Attorney John
,E. Davies to take steps to have the
waterworks plan with Louis C. Kelsey
formally rejected, and the announce
ment by Chairman C. B. Channel of the
water committee, that he would short
ly consult another expert engineer
relative to certain phases of the water
situation.
The council ordered the removal of
the news stand conducted at the cor
ner of Second avenue north and Sho
shone street by K. Packard, which was
permitted temporarily under the for
mer administration.
City Engineer James A. Bybee was
(Continued on Page 8)
BODY OF THE BOY IS
Party From Hagerniau Took Body
From Stream Sunday Evening—No
Signs of Violence.
There were no marks of bullets or
of other violence on the body of Glenn
Hoffman, of Jerome, whose body was
recovered from the Snake river late
Sunday evening by a party from Ha
german, after being in water
weeks. The body had previously been
seen on several occasions, a point a
mile and a half below where the boy
entered the river, but it evidently was
held by eddies until Sunday.
Sunday afternoon one of the Owsley
brothers saw it floating near Owsley's
ferry and tried to recover it.
body was caught in a swirl and swept
downward. He then telephoned to
Sheriff Kendall, who telephoned to the
Jerome sheriff. Deputy Sheriff John
telephoned to Hagerman where a
In the
two
Late
The
son
party was hastily organized,
meantime Sheriff Kendall called to
gether a crowd here to go out, but
just as they were ready to start word
came that the body had been secured.
Last night Deputy Johnson tele
phoned to Sheriff Kendall that an in
quist had been called yesterday after
noon and that a careful examination
of the body indicated that no violence
had been used on the body before his
death. His body was in good condi
tion except that the face was discolor
ed from exposure and scratched by
the hushes along the bank. The in
quest adjourned until this afternoon in
order to examine the other hoy who
was with Glenn the day of his death,
and William McDonald, the man who
was chasing him when he ran into the
river. Public feeling in Jerome has
become much less tense since it was
learned that McDonald did not shoot.
the boy or did not beat him to death
and throw him into the river to hide
a crime.
Sneaking of the long search. Sher
iff Kendall said last night that the
principal credit was due to the boy
scouts, who although they did not re
cover the body, were the first to dis
cover it on this side of the river, and
whose work was tireless and at all
times Intelligent and active. They
did work that would have tired the
strongest man.
NEGRO BURNED TO STAKE
WHILE CITY HAS HOLIDAY.
(United Press.)
NEW ORLEANS, May 22—Eli Par
sons, a negro, was burned to the stake
near Pottscamp, Miss., last night by a
mob which took him from the officers.
Parsons confessed to the killing of
Antoinette Rappel by cutting off her
head, after an assault. While Par
sons was tied he confessed killing and
assaulting the girl and implicated two
other Negroes. The crowd found De
Witt Ford, one of the men implicated
and is holding him until the third Ne
gro is' found when there will be a
double lynching. The lynching caus
ed a virtual holiday in Memphis. Prac
tically all the stores are closed. Wom
en and girls mingled In the crowd
which sang "John Brown's Body"
while Parsons was being burned.
While the Negro was burning, the
mother of the little girl cried, "Let
him suffer as he made my little girl
suffer." An excited Negro in the
crowd cried, "We're through, let's join
the Germans." He was rescued from
the crowd by police who gave him to
the federal authorities.
g——
SUES TO COMPEL SALE OK
lUMMOO WATER RIGHTS
The Twin Falls Land & Wat
er company, the old construc
tion company, yesterday filed
suit in the federal district
court, to compel the Twin Falls
Canal Co. to sell, and the slate
land board to approve of sales
of water rights for approxi
mately 40,000 acres of land un
der the canal system. The
company was given authority
originally to sell rights for
240,000 acres. It has sold
rights for 200,000 acres and re
fuses to sell more, being sus
tained by the land board. Some
water has been sold for school
land, but the present land
sorted by Sweeley & Sweeley,
the attorneys for the plain
tiff that between 4000 and
5000 acres is subject to irriga
tion by gravity and 35,000 sub
ject to irrigation by pumping.
The plaintiff claims that the
canal company and board has
no power to withhold the wat
er rights where demanded. The
plaintiff has an interest in the
proceeds of all sales and the
total proceeds of sales would be
about $1,000,000.
CANAL STORY PLEASES
Secretary Says Assurance Given in
Times That Canal Board Will Hire
Farmers Is of Great Value.
"The article in the Sunday Times
regarding the fixing of the canals and
headgates by the farmers was one of
deep interest and value and I am sure
that it will do a great deal of good
throughout the county," said Secre
tary W. F. Edwards, of the Twin Falls
Counay Farm Bureau, yesterday," and
am confident that it will be the
means of getting a great many to
offer their services who otherwise
\v ould not have known that they would
he accepted. The farmers of the coun
ty are willing to do anything possible
to fix the headgates and get water.
They would be willing to do it for
nothing, but, ot course they are en
titled to current wages, although these
will not in any way repay them
directly for the loss of their time from
farm work. What they want is to get
water.
The farm bureau has been working
among the farmers with a view of
getting all of them to help fix the
ditches and headgates, if satisfactory
to the canal board, and they were
practically unanimously in favor of
doing it."
"I am not mixing in this matter
of the details of getting water," said
County Agent W. N. Birch, "but I am
greatly interested in it, for all that,
for it will not do much good to sug
gest means of caring for spuds if the
ditches and headgates are in such
condition that water cannot he
brought to start them. In that case,
the farmers had better eat the seed.
There is more water this year than
ever before, the only question being
in regard to getting it to the land.
The article puts the canal hoard on
record as willing to co-operate and
willing to hire the farmers and furn
ish material, where competent super
vision can be secured, and I am sure
that the farmers will respond quickly.
The canal board has complained that
it could not get labor to do the neces
sary work. Now that the farmers are
ready to do it themselves and the
board ready to hire them, we may look
for effective co-operation that will get
it done."
The substance of the story referred
to above, which Was published in the
last issue of the Sunday Times, was
that the canal board would he glad to
hire as many farmers as possible at
current wages wherever competent
foremen could be secured to direct the
work so that it would prove effective.
They want all who are willing to help
. , ...
Iet «u fact he known at headquar
where they promise to do every
thing possible to co-operate.
j
j
VOTING FOR FIRST TIME
All British Subjects Over 21 Eligible
To Cast Ballots In Manitoba This
Week.
WINNIPEG, Man., May 22.—Women
who are British subjects over 21 years
of age are registering as new voters
in Manitoba today, this being the first
province In Canada to grant the fran
chise to the fair sex. Since Manitoba
took the step all the western prvinces
and Ontario and Nova Scotia have fol
lowed her example. The new voting
lists will be approved by the Cana
dian government for use in the gen
eral elections this summer.
SUNDAY TIMES AD GOT
RESULTS MONDAY A. M.
"The advertisement in the
Sunday Times yesterday got us
over $100 worth of advertising
already" said Boyd Fuller of
Franklin Turbine company at
10 o'clock yesterday morning.
Mr. Fuller recently returned
from the east with many en
dorsements for the products
of the company and used the
Times columns (to tell about
It.
LEGAL HOLIDAY FOR
REGISTRATION DAY
FIVE THOUSAND DELEGATES
TOLEDO MAKE INROADS INTO
LOCAL GROCERY STOCKS.
IN
WAR PROBLEMS DISCUSSED BY
Denunciation of Those Who Store
Great Quantities of Needed Supplies
Is Voiced In The Gathering By
Speaker.
TOLEDO, O., May 22—Fo'lowiug a
series of addresses on war problems
as they affect grocers, nearly five
thousand members of the Retail Gro
cery Association will attend a ban
quet in the Terminal auditorium to
night that will make heavy Inroads
on grocer supplies of the city which
is entertaining them in annual con
vention. The day's program includes
addresses by many noted educators
and leading business men of the coun
try.
Confronted with a good crisis, five
thousand retail grocers from all parts
ot the United States met here yester
day for their national four-day con
vention to discuss the question of
feeding a nation.
Not since the Civil War have retail
faced such grave problems of
feeding a nation at war, with a food
shortage on one hand and steadily
soaring prices on the other, accord
ing to J. J. Ryan, secretary of the Na
tional Association of Retail Grocers.
One of the big questions for con
sideration will he a campaign educa
tion aimed at those individuals who
"lay in" an abnormal supply of food
in anticipation of a rising market.
"We believe there is going to be a
shortage of food if the war lasts any
length of time, and the idea of some
person storing a great quantity of
groceries while others are in want, is
against our idea of patriotism," de
clared George Sawkins, Toledo grocer,
who will take a prominent part in the
convention.
The grocers will seek a fairer treat
ment of the small grocer, who, be
cause he buys in smaller quantities,
is unable to compete witli the larger
ers
grocer.
Retailers are to make a desperate
effort to keep wholesale from boost
ing prices but admittedly they are
working against heavy odds. Govern
ment contracts and a ready market
abroad will compete with the retailers
who wish to hold prices to the mini
mum. The grocers say people cannot
afford to pay higher prices. The re
tailers, if they are unable to hold
wholesale prices down, will face the
necessity of pushing prices higher
steadily or quitting business, officials
say.
Delegates from European countries
who have usually attended, are pres
ent this year.
FRENCH REPORT THAT
Lost 15,000 Men Since Sunday—Bread
Riots In Lisbon—Attempt to Kill
Kerensky Failed.
(H. Wood, U. P. Correspondent)
FRENCH HEADQUARTERS, May
22—Since Sunday the Germans lost
over 16,000 killed and wounded and
missing. The French have gained full
possession of all the dominating crests
in the Moron viliers sector; Neville's
control all the important
forces
points between Mount Cornillet and
Teton, within half a mile of Moron
villers Itself.
A number of fierce counter attacks
have been repulsed.
The British are consolidating their
newly won positions on the Hinden
berg line. General Haig has not re
ported any major fighting actions but
showed effective British artillery
work.
A report from Madrid today stated
that food riots had broken out in Lis
bon and that fifty had been seriously
injured in them. The troops ended
the trouble with difficulty.
NEW YORK, May 22—An unsuc
cessful attempt to kill Minister of War
Kerensky of Russia was reported In
a dispatch received here today by the
Jewish Daily Forward. The dispatch
said that Kerensky escaped and all
assailants were arrested.
GOVERNOR
ALEXANDER
PROCLAMATION ANNOUNCING
THE PATRIOTIC OCCASION
ISSUES
ÂLL WHO FAIL TO REGISTER WILL
Terms Set Forth At Length By Slier
iff Frank M. Kendall Giving- All 1 lie
Conditions Wliieh Must Be Com
plied With.
1
[
i
I
4
,,, , ,
All men between the ages ot
21 and 31, inclusive, must reg
13 , ... , _
Any person failing to tegis
or who registers falsely shall be
gu»ty °f a misdemeanor
In case of emporary absence
from his egal residence, a man
must register by mail.
Hours of registration shall
be between 7 a. m. and 9 p m.,
June o, 191., at the registry
tion place in their home pre
. _
Those who are too ill to reg
ister are requested to apply for
instructions before June 5 as to
how they may register by
ag Tho S se absent from home on
JUne ™ nn h n a11 ' in Clt 'f
over 30,000 Population apply to
the city clerk of the city where
in they may be sojourning
That registration day. while
not a holiday, should he made
a great day of patriotic devo
tion and obligation when the
duty shall lie upon every man
to see to it that the name of
every male person of the desig
nated ages is written on the
list of honor."
JUNE ,» PROCLAIMED
A LEGAL HOLIDAY
Whereas, by action of con
gress, and by proclamation of
the president of the United
States, June 5, 1917, has been
fixed as the day upon which
large numbers of the residents
of the state of Idaho will be re
quired to perform the first act
of the highest duly which citi
zens of the nation can be called
upon to perform, the duty of of
fering their services to their
country in time ot war,
Now, therefore, I, M. Alexand
er, governor of the state of
Idaho, by virtue of the author
ity vested in me by the laws
ot this state, do set aside and
proclaim the said Tuesday, June
6, 1917, a legal holiday, and I do
call upon all citizens and resi
dents within this state to render
every encouragement and as
sistance possible in the registra
tion of those called upon to
register for military duty, and
I do request that during the
registration hours from 7
a. m. to 9 p. ra., flags be dis
played upon all public buildings,
business houses and residences,
and upon all automobiles and
other vehicles, and that resi
dents of the state carry upon
their person small flags and
that every other evidence of
loyalty and patriotism pos
sible be made evident upon that
day to the end that this act of
registration for military dut,y
may bo made the occasion of
a display of universal patriotic
feeling and an evidence of the
devotion of the citizens of Ida
ho to the cause of our beloved
Nation.
Done at Boise, the capital of
the state this nineteenth day of
May in the year ot Our Lord,
one thousand nine hundred
seventeen, and of the Independ
ence of the United States the one
hundred and forty-first.
M. ALEXANDER,
Governor.
At test :
W. T. DOUGHERTY,
Secretary ot State.
PRESIDENT WILSON'S
PROCLAMATION SAYS;
"I shall have all the registration of
ficers selected by tomorrow and we
will he ready at once to handle the
situation," said Sheriff Frank M. Ken
dall, last night, speaking of the draft
day for June 5. "and I wish that
could be impressed on the people that
every man between the ages of twen
ty-one and thirtyone, inclusive, who
does not register on that day will
arrested and subjected to a penalty
which may amount to a year in jail.
I want everyone to understand that
the conditions will not allow any de
lay. This applies to all people of the
aees named whether citizens or aliens.
All must register. If anyone is going
(Continued on Page 4)
msm
HOW
ENTENTE
GENERALS
AND
TROOPS DESTROYED
PLANS
OF MARSHAL II IN DEN BERG
OFFENSE OF THEIR ENEMIES
Over (10,000 Prisoners Taken During
Offensive and Teutons Placed Per
manently on the Defensive By Great
Movement.
By PERKY ARNOLD
(United Press.)
NEW YORK, May 22—Something
like 145 square miles of French ter
ritory regained; more than 60,000
prisoners taken; from 75,000 to 260,
000 killed and stoppage of all plans
for a German western front offensive
have been the results achieved to
date in the groat Franco-British of
fensive.
The figures are purely estimates.
Neither the allies or Germany have
yet issued casualty lists for this fight
ing. The front is so irregular that it
is difficult to figure out actual acre
age wrested from the invader. But the
defeat of Hindenherg's plans for the
summer's fighting have been achieved
beyond all doubt.
The strategy of the famous Hinden
berg retreat was to force the British
and French to make their much-adver
tised spring offensive over ground
chosen by the German commander
and against positions defensively pre
pared in advance.
Hlndenberg selected the last few
days of winter as the time in which
to make his retreat, figuring it was
too early for the spring offensive to
begin, and that the spring tiiaws
would come at a time when movement
of pursuing troops would be most dif
ficult. However, in order to hamper
pursuit, he laid waste to every inch
of ground. At least three supplemen
tary defense lines to the Hindenberg
line were spread over this ground re
leased to the French and British. The
Germans figured these lines would
check all advances and permit with
drawal with a minimum of German
losses planned a spring offensive of
their own on some other front, confi
dent in the impregnability of this
long-prepared line against any Fran
co-British offensives.
But the French and British pursuit
was the more speedy than the Ger
mans had counted upon. Not only
did the allies quickly swarm over
the first preliminary German defensive
lines, hut they speeded up and started
their spring offensive several weeks
ahead of time. Moreover, instead of
directing the attacks at the pivots to
the north and south on which Hinden
berg had swung his retreat, the Brit
ish began turning the northern
point on this Hindenberg line by
capture of Fresnoy, Gavrelle and of
Oppy. To the south, the French
crumbled it away around Cerny and
(Taonne. It is around these northern
and southern points that the fighting
is of fiercest intensity today.
The Hindenberg line is supposed to
8tan 8omewhere about Drocourt,
wb i cb lies midway between Lens and
Douai. A so-called "switch-line" pre
sumablv long prepared, connects Dro
; tbe P ld German , inp around
Fr0 m nrocourt the H inden
„wings through Bois Ber
f Fresenoy. then south to Oppy,
through Baverelle, Reoux. Pelves, Rl
encourt. Hendencourt, Remy, Boiry
Notre Dame and to Queant .
T1 ,j s section of the Hindenberg line
hag been crumbled and is dubbed the
Wotan line by the Germans, after the
Supreme God. The Wotan line
protec ted by the so-called Oppy line
eliminary defe nse front between
0pp p Gaverll f e and ReoU x. It bas
** th ° SC 'b™ 6 P ° intS
From Queant, the Hindenberg line
run8 through Beaumetz. Viliers Heudi
Ro isel. Vermand, St. Quentin,
Laon . sissonne Craon ne. a
the Aisne and down to a po int
north of Rheimg .
J T b j s sp( , tion f rom Queant south, has
been called the ..giegfried line" by the
J Germang — a fter the Wagerain hero. It
| h been pene trated at Craonne and
Rh elms by the French,
!
DEPUTY SHERIFF OUT AGAIN
Deputy Sheriff W. G. Thompson who
was taken suddenly and severely ill
Saturday evening is out on the street
this afternoon, still feeling under the
weather.
it
BRAZIL EXPECTS TO
DECLARE WAR TODAY
(United Press.)
RIO DE JANERIO, May 22—
Brazil may declare war today
on Germany, officials here say.
President Braz announced this
morning that he would trans
mit a special message to con
gress late today. The great
est interest is manifested.

xml | txt