OCR Interpretation


The Twice-a-week Twin Falls times. (Twin Falls, Idaho) 1916-1918, June 19, 1917, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055261/1917-06-19/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

%
Personal Obligation NOW—-Help the Red Cross
THE TWICE-A-WEEK
Every Patriot Must Realize a
,
TRY A WANTAD IN THE SUN
DAY TIMES AND GET RE
SULTS- THEY NEVER FAIL.
Advertise in the Times—it will
' reach the largest number of
people wth your message.

■S\
V
❖v—
TWIN PALLS, IDAHO.
TUESDAY, JUNE 19. 1917
VOL. XII. NO ?;i
V.
*
>

i
;
SPLENDID DONATIONS MARK THE
FIRST DAY OF THE CAM.
PAIGN FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS
AH Who Have Season Tickets Are Ad
mitted- Others Can Get Into Con
•ort and Chautauqua F'or Hie Sum
«I One Dollar.
NOTES OF R. C. DRIVE
IN FULL SWING HERE

1
;
1
The Orst twenty-two men ap
proached gave a total sum of
$5550.—Second Idaho Baud to
give concert tomorrow night in
Chautauqua Tent at 7 o'clock
followed by full program—Din
ner of captains in city at Rog
erson hotel last night—Dinner
of captains in the county at
Rogers<>n hotel tonight. Re
ports from all other towns In
dicate enthusiasm and results
rivalling Twin F'alls.
i
I
The Red Cross drive is in full swing
here and contributions are being made
in a way that is fully satisfactory to
the captains, not only In amounts but
still more In the spirit in which they
are given. At the dinner of the cap
tains at the Hotel Rogerson last night
and the meeting which followed all
reports showed that the greatest en
thusiasm was displayed by the people
everywhere. The first twenty-two
men approached donated the total
sum of $6550. The committee are all
busy today. Last night the captains
asked the city council for a donation
for the fund and the matter was put
up to City Attorney John B. Davies to
determine whether such action could
be taken legally.
Reports from all surrounding towns
indicate that the same spirit is being
shown, while the country districts are
ou fire.
At Fiollister last night, following
address by President Turner K.
'Mackman of the Twin Palls Commer
cial club, more than $300 was sub
scribed and the sum of $500 will
easily be raised there all t..!d. A big
hell at the corner of Main avenue and
Shoshone streets taps
thousand dollars raised in the coun
ty, and has tapped fifteen times al
ready, with the campaign scarcely
started. Eight thousand has been
collected in the city up to noon.
The Second Idaho regimental band
will arrive in the city on the noon
train tomorrow and will march up
town playing, after a reception at the
depot. There will be a concert in
the park in the afternoon and one
at the Chautauqua tent In the even
ing. Those who hold season tickets
to the Chautauqua will be admitted.
Those who do not. may gain admis
sion to the concert for a dollar. The
concert will be followed by the full
consisting of
.in
for every
chaatauoua program
the Australian Manikins and the ad
dress on "What America Means to
Me" hv a nephew of David Lloyd
George'. The dollar admission lets
yon in for the concert and the full
program' The concert begins at 7
«'clock sharp.
RUSSIAN MISSION COE
Secretary Lansing—
Crowds Cheer—American Commis
sioners Progressing in Russia.
Reoc'vcd by
(International News Service)
WASHINGTON, June 19—The spe
cial mission of the Russian republic
arrived on a special train today from
San Francisco and were greeted by
Secretary Lansing,
ceivod here today indicates that the
American mission is making excel
lent progress in the preliminary dis
cussion with the new government. The
real difficulty will be met when the
aims come up for consideration.
Information re
war
The Americans are hopeful of suc
cess. A powerful group outside the
government is suspicious that Ameri
is trying to compel Russia to fight
to the end.
ca
GÜARDMEN EXPECTED TO GO
WITHOUT INTENSITE TRAINING
(International News Service)
WASHINGTON, Jnne 1»— The pos
nihility of the national guardsmen ice
lag sent to France without intensive
training was strengthened when Bri
gadier General Mann issued orders
today to all adjutant generals to mo
hilize troops in the armories of large
cities to await orders.
PARIS, June 19— An American
ambulance unit of 250 persons
rived at a French port today.
,
U
»RIAL SERVICE HELD
FOR LATE C. O. LONG LE Y
*r
Mem, v service was held F'rlday
for the i. <V.'. O. Longley in the dis- i
trict court and after many kind things |
had been said by the brothers in the
legal fraternity, court adjourned for :
the day. Speeches were made by H. i
Hazel, John E. Davies, F'. E. Cham
berlain, E. M. Wolfe, W. P. Guthrie |
and E. A. Walters, of the Twin F'alls
county bar, and by Kurland O. Heist
of Shoshone, who presented the for
mal resolutions of regret, adopted by
the Lincoln county bar. The resolu
tions were ordered spread on the min
utes. Before the adjournment of court I
out of respect. Judge AY. A. Babcock
spoke feelingly of the pleasant recol-1
lections of the relations of Air. Long- j
ley with him, both as a fellow lawyer j
and a member of Hie bar. Those
present besides Judge Babcock were;
E. L. Ashton, C. A. Bailey, Frank E.
Chamberlain, Taylor Cummins, J. E.
Davies. W. P. Guthrie. George Her
riott, S. T. Hamilton, Guy L. Kinney,
A. J. Myers, F'. L. Stephan. F,. A.
AValters, E. M Wolfe, of Twin Falls
county bar and Harland O. Heist of
the Lincoln county bar.
F AT 11 E R K N U' K E RBO C K E R
COMES ACROSS SPLF.ND1DLA
(International News Service)
WASHINGTON, June 19—-Up to
noon today, 137 cities exclusive of
New York had subscribed $3,000,000
vvhileNew York City had snh
scribed $15,000.000.
T took him just as he
went up over the
'trench parapet—took
him full in his bare and
muscular throat. It was
I
hardly bigger than one of
those rubber erasers tin
ned to the ends of lead
But with the
pencils.
driving power of b : 'b en
ergy powder behind its
steel-jacketed nose, it was
an altogether competent
and devilishly capable
agent of destruction. lie lay quite still, a few yards ahead of the trench, where his rush
had carried him. The morning drew toward noon. -]- -|- -|- With night came the beginning ot
Ids torment. First it was thirst, thon fever, then delirium. Always his spilling wound burn
ed and throbbed. Even on the second night, with the rain beating down upon him, it
glowed like a kiln. By 'the third day his ago ny spoke in screams. -|- -|- -|- A stretcher par
ty found him and trundled him away, down through the line of Red Cross units, from dress- ■
ing station to field base, eventually to Paris. -|- -|- lie was French, but he was fighting our fl
fight, lie was French, but a few months from now his counterpart may be American, I
There are bullets enough for all. He may he a boy you know, perhaps a neighbor's boy, even I
your own. Fighting our fight. Will you help him, when our fight has broken him, to fight E
ids? Will you help him, when his young body and vivid force are spent and shattered, do fl
retrieve what he mav? Give something to 'the Red ('ross. It is the wounded soldier's truest I
allv. It is his hope. 'Give FIVE DOLLARS. TEN DOLLARS, TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS,
HUNDRED DOLLARS, ■
■■■KOHmraHBMn
a
if you can. Do your part.
If you cannot go. you can
give. Those going are
giving
more. There is a local
immeasurably
RED CROSS
Chapter in Twin Palls
The Campaign Is On
Now—Do Your Bit To
day
|
[
I
!
BODY OF MURDERED GIRL
FOUND IN CELLAR
Nation Wide Search Ends in Bis-j
Through Persistence of
covery
of Woman Lawyer.
united Press.)
NEW YORK, June 16.—Pretty sev
enteen-year-old Ruth Cruger will go
down in police annals as one of the
5000 persons lost annually in the
streets of New York. Thanks to one
of her own sex who clung to the
search after friends, police and par
ents gave her up.
late today dead. Her body was buried
ten feet below the concrete flooring
in a dingy basement of the bicycle re
pair shop of Alfredo Cochi into which
she walked in the afternoon of Feb
ruary IS to have skates sharpened. A
stout rope bound her feet which had
almost entirely disappeared under the
action of the quick lime enveloping
her body. Three days after the girl
disappeared Cochi sailed for Italy.
The police conducted a nation-wide
search and ran down scores of clues.
Mrs. Grace Humiston, a woman law
yer. refused to quit the search after
everybody else gave up, directed the
diggers who found a carefully hidden
grave under the bicycle shop. Tlw
She was found
ar
HArF MEKT BEGINNING JULY 3
Famous Trotters, Racers and Pacers
Coming F'rom AH Parts of the State
AND RUNNING OVER FOURTH
CROWDED AVITH EVENTS
GREAT PATRIOTIC PARADE ON THE
—Balloon Ascension one of the Big
Features.
xhe monB t e r parade on the Fourth
of July at Filer will be held in the
morning, beginning a day of patrlo
tism and pleasure at the Flier fair
grounds. Many splendid floats sym
!-
(Continued on Page 8)
pollce tonight say that they have con
elusive evidence that Cochl killed the
girl. The state department has been
asked to secure the help of Italy to
get the criminal. Mrs. Cochi is be
ing detained.
Capital of Nation No Doubt About
Successful Outcome of Present Con
flict.
(United Press.)
WASHINGTON. June 19.—Washing
ton as a war capital is a city of pa
triotic enthusiasm and obsolute con
fidence.
It is like a big college town on the
eve of an important football game, in
which everybody is positive the home
team will win.
As yet it has none of the darkened
streets and bereaved homes of Lon
don and Paris, none of the food regu
lations and casualty lists of Berlin
and Vienna and no hint of the anarchy
and riots which have hit Petrograd.
The city is aflutter with flags, and
at night searchlights pick out the
Stars and Stripes floating over many
of the downtown buildings,
thump of the war-drum le frequent
The
ASKED $5000 FROM CITY FOR
.
National Master Plumbers Conven
tion AVill Be Invited To Come Here
RED ( ROSS FUNDS AND WAS
BACKED BY OTHERS
ANSWER1LL DEPEND DN THE
POWER OF THE CITY TO ACT
Next Year—Reckless Drivers Will
Be Prosecuted by Authorities.
The city dads sat up and took notice
last night when In behalf of the exe
cutlve committee and captains of the
committees, D. M. Denton invaded;
their peaceful meeting and proposed
_ Z -1— -;
(Continued on Page 8)
ly heard. The crash of martial music j
stirs historic Pennsylvania avenue, j
Soldiers and sailors mingle with the
crowds, but they attract little atten-1
tion. Bugles sound, the shrill fife
rings over the noise of traffic as the
citizens go about their "business as
usual."
In the midst of the most important
period since southern armies smash
ed at the capltol's defenses 60 years
ago, Washington refuses to believe j
there is cause for anything more than j
a feeling of implicit confidence that
with every man and woman "in the
play" the Kaiser will be soundly
thrashed and war's darker side will
never throw a shadow over its gay
street.
There are guards at the govern
ment buildings, where official passes
or permits are demanded. This about
sums up the war atmosphere visible
to the casual observer in AA'ashington.
Underneath it all there is the real,
grim push of preparation for the tl
tantic conflict, but these activities do
not crop out on the surface,
people radiate confidence. Their at
tude towards the great army now in
process of organization is; "Eat 'em
up boys, and get home soon. We'll
wait for dinner."
on realty business.
G. W. Wedgwood and O. C. Osborn
of Gooding were in the city Monday
i
The
nil. SCH IV A HZ SEEKS LEAVE TO
GET MOKE IN HOSPITAL CORPS
Eighteen applicants have lieen ten
talheiy accepted for the new Idaho
hospital corps by Or. E. T. Schwarz,
and so many more have shoyn a dis.
position to join since Hie publication
of Hie facts in the Times last Tues
day, that Or. Schwarz, having reached
the limit is now endeavoring to get
leave to sign up more, pending which
no more will be accepted. The follow
ing are now on the Hst: E niest E.
Lodgden, William L. Epier, John W.
Kendall, Lee L. Hurst, Russell C. Os
trander, Loren E. Blakeslee, Merle L.
Templeton, Harry IV. Flintoff, Tracey
T. Journey, a. E. Smith, James G.
Hagel, Wilbur Holler, Leonard Avant,
Donald Bonwell, Twin Falls; Harold
W. Moore and Benjamin F. Train of
Kimberly and Harry E. Lammers and
Kerd I). Yourd of Filer.
Later — Or, Schwarz has been au
thorized to accept three more and
Frank T. McAnley has already joined.
Applications should be in before to
morrow night when Or. Schwarz will
leave for Boise.
SALMON DAM REACHES MAXIMUM
A'esterday the water In the Salmon
dam reached its maximum for this
year, having a total depth of 66.1
I feet, or 135,240 acre feet, against a
.... ,
total depth of o3.4 feet, with 102,690
acre l° r the previous high water
mark,, reached June 6, 1914, and a
total of 62,800 feet which was the
j maximum last year. —
(International News Service)
PARIS, June 19 (Official)—The
Germans today attacked the French
ATTACK WITH HEAVY LOSS
British Capture a F'ew Prisoners But
Are Mostly Quiet—German Losses
Over F'onr Millions
lines in Champaigne in an effort to
regain ground between Mont Blond
and Mont Carnillot, but were repuls
ed with heavy losses in killed, wound
ed and prisoners. At Parroy fort,
the FYench conducted some success
In patrol operations and captured a
number of prisoners. The Germans
were also repulsed In an attack north
of St. Quinten.
LONDON, June 19—There was com
parative inactivity on the British front
today. Southeast of Lervergler, the
British raided the German trenches
and bomb dugouts and took a few
prisoners.
Allied troops today captured the
Thessaly railroad, the most impor
tant in Greece, without opposition.
German casualties up to Juno 1
since the beginning of the war was
4,356,760, including the wounded and
prisoners.
PEOPLE EXPECI
PO CONTRIBUTE
MUCH MORE THAN THE TOWN
HAS BEEN ASKED TO DO
SYSTEMATIC WORK DONE TO MAKE
DRIVE BIG SUCCESS
Leading Business Men Taking Active
Part In Conducting the Campaign—
Live News From Municipality East
Of Us.
KIMBF1RLY, Juno 18—Kimberly is
conducting the big Red Cross drive
planned last week. Twenty-three
men volunteered their undivided ser
vices for this occasion, and will work
incessantly for the cause until Kim
berly has contributed at least fifty
per cent more than the amount as
sessed It.
Through the efforts of R. H. Den
ton and his co-workers a crowd of
Kimberly business men met at the
Gem State Lumber company office
Friday night and listened to the Red
Cross program as it is to be worked
out in the United States during the
week beginning yesterday. L. L.
Breckenridge and E. L. MacVicar of
Twin Falla presented the propaganda,
and showed to the business men of
this city, the real situation of the
United States in the present war
crisis, as they had never realized It
before, and explained to them the
tremendous importance of the Red
Cross work.
So impressed, were those who lis
tened to these addresses, that before
the meeting was adjourned, the men
began to gather in small groups and
talk about their respective duties in
this Importance. They talked In hun
dreds and fifties, and not in tens and
fives as heretofore. The citizens of
Kimberly have a feeling about this
matter that runs near intense pa
triotism: patriotism coupled with de
termination and movement.
R. H. Denton, local executive chair
man. and campaign manager, remark
ed today after conversing with nearly
every man In town, that Kimberly
would undoubtedly raise two thous
and dollars for this cause, and that
has been accepted as the present aim.
The leading business men of the
city comprise the number who have
volunteered to carry on this cam
paign. Aside from R. H. Denton, who
will manage the campaign, twenty
men have been chosen to take part in
raising this money. Those twenty
are divided into four teams, as fol
lows; W. P. Breckon. captain of
team No. 1, composed of W. P. Swear*
Ingen, James Halfrey, W. S. Martin,
and Lee Stettier; L. H. Walden, cap
tain of team No. 2, composed of B.
H. Atkinson. A. ' J. Wilson, George
Bremer, H. W. Mund; J. W. Harden,
captain of team No. 3, composed of
Garl Ridgeway, B. F. Train. Charles
Lamon, W. A. Gill; R. C. Wilson, cap
tain of Team No. 4, composed of W.
A. Stowe, N. W. Swearingen, Charles
Upton, P. D. Johnson.
Rev. A. W. James will compose a
committee of one for the obtaining
and management of the campaign
speakers: and V. G. Backman has
charge of the publicity work.
The above named men met togeth
er tonight and planned the Campaign,
which commenced in full blast Tues
day morning and will last until the
work is all completed. "Two thous
and dollars from Kimberly" Is the
land mark and slogan of the cam
paign.
SALARY DID NOT JIBE
AYITH IN DI8PEN SIB1LITY
LONDON. June 19.—Appearing be
fore an army tribunal recently a
firm of munition importers claimed
exemption for a man 28 years old be
cause of indispenslblllty.
porters asserted their business had
been increased $20,000,000 by the war,
partially through the efforts of the
man for whom they claimed exemp
tion.
The im
"How much do you pay this man?"
asked the magistrate. "We pay him
$1260 annually" answered a member
ot the firm.
"The salary hardly corresponds to
the profits" grumbled the magistrate.
"If we grant this man an exemption
and he asks for an increase of salary
will you give It to him"
"I really don't know," replied the
employer.
"Well, suppose he should meet with
an accident what would you do?"
queried the magistrate.
"That would be only temporary."
"So is the war," fairly yelled the
court and ordered the man to join up.
to
a
( AN TELL YOU AT
1
WHAT TIME YOU DIED
RIO DE JANEIRO, June 19.—A
discovery of interest to medics and
police surgeons in particular has
been announced by Dr. Belmlro Val
verde before the faculty of medicine
in this city. Dr. Valverde's discov
ery enables the scientist to determine
the exact date of death by means of
crystals precipitated in the blood of
a corpse. It Is claimed here that
the process la entirely new.

xml | txt