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The Twice-a-week Twin Falls times. (Twin Falls, Idaho) 1916-1918, July 26, 1917, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055261/1917-07-26/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE Ct DO HOPPER
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STARRING CHARLES RAY
Made Him Work From Early Till Late, Wouldn't Even Let Him Take His
He Was Having the Time of His Life; Had Just Won a Prize of Five
He Sure Was an Awkward Country Boy. They Called Him the Clod-Hopper. His Dad Treated Him Mighty Mean,
Best Girl to the Fourth of July Picnic. But His Mother Rigged Him Out in a Six Dollar Sears Roebuck Suit, and Let Him Go.
Dollars for Riding the Wild Mule, When His Dad Appeared on the Scene—You Should See What follows. It's a Clean-cut Comedy Story of Life as Many of Us Have Seen it.
"The Clod-Hopper" Had to Leave Home, but He Overcame His Handicaps and Fought His Way to Success. Charles Ray Plays His Part—We CanU Help but Like Him. Don t Miss This Tu
angle Production, Fully as Good as You Will Expect It to be.
1 he Star of the "Pinch Hitter" and
the "Millionaire Vagrant Scores a
Big Hit Again in this Trangle Play.
It's Brimming with Beauty and ac
tion of the Joy-Giving Sort.
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The Dance Sensation of the Year—"The Clod-Hopper" Glide, Devised and
Demonstrated by Charles Ray, Shown in the Roof Garden Scene of This Live
ly Comedy Drama.
See This Feature—Thursday Matinee and Night
Friday Matinee and Night
Another Good Feature Saturday Matinee and Night,'Starring SHORTY HAM
ILTON Entitled
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Shorty Joins the Secret Service
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ROSE AND ROSANA
THE MAN WITH THE HARP AND THE DANC
ING GIRL. A MUSICAL TREAT
LIBBY-BLONDELL AND COMPANY
NOVELTY, SINGING, TALKING
COMEDIANS
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Charles Ray In Triangle Play, 'The
Clodhopper."
Hippodrome Circuit Vaudeville Attractions Mean a Standard
Consistently Maintained
Always a Good Lariety===Always Your Money s Worth
THE ORPHEUM THEATRE
min
HERRIOTT SAYS
POSTOFFICE IS
TO MOVE NOV. 1
DECLARES THAT HE HAS
LEASE CINCHED AND THAT
THE CHANGE WILL BE
MADE
Contract Terminable
by U. S. in 90 Days
Lessee Brings Out Points of Ad
vantage in New Building—Says
He Hopes That Government
Will Soon Build.
"While the postmaster probably
has not been notified up to the pres
ent," said George Herriott yesterday.
"as a matter of fact my bid for the
postoftice has been accepted and the
matter is settled. There seems to be
some misapprehension about the five
year lease matter. The government
reserves the right to terminate the
lease at any time by the serving of
a ninety-day notice, so that whenever
the new building is erected my lease
will end. Personally. 1 hope that this
will be soon, because the construction
of a government building on the cor
ner of Main avenue and Second street
west would greatly enhance the val
ue of my property in which the post
office will be located until the build
ing is finished and I would get a great
deal more rent out of it than I will
get from the government.
"The new location is about six feet
nearer the center of town than the
old one. It has the advantage of more
room, better lighting and other con
veniences including steam heat. An
other advantage consists in the fact
that the mail can be delivered inside
the building in an auto instead of be
ing carried through a muddy alley as
at present. The lease is tor five years,
terminable by the government on
three months notice, as I said, and the
rent is $180,0 a year. The present lo
cation costs the government $1200, al
though the owners get more, the dif
ference being made up by private sub
scription. I am informed that the
owners of the present location bid
$2400 a year for a lease similar to the
one which I secured, with the under
standing that they would build an ad
dition to give more room. They could
not afford to take it for less.
"I am convinced that the people will
find the new location a satisfactory
\
one in every way. The lease runs
from November 1."
"We put in a bid of $2400 for the
postoffice," said A. L. S\vim, a stock
holder of the Federal Building com
pany, "but the addition we would
have made would have given consid
erably more floor space than will be
secured from the part of the Herriott
building which was leased. However,
there is not much profit in the Her
riott building at the rate of $1800 a
year; except for the incidental advan
tages which will result in the increas
ing of the rental value of the rest of
the building, 1 am confident that it
would not rty regular rates of inter
est on the money invested. A sidewalk
will bo built from Main avenue back to
Second avenue west in a short time
and this, with tlie presence of the
postoffice, should increase the rental
value of the property facing Second
avenue. There is not much profit in
renting to the government and while
we were willing to build the addition
back to the alley and enter another
lease, at the rate of $2400 a year, we
were not especially anxious to do so."
Twin Falls Again
Mentioned in Congress
Senator Borah Reads Letter From
Commercial Club Urging Further
Idaho. Mr. Smith; and I have prepar
ed this bill in the form of an amend
Legislation.
On account of a letter sent June 26
to Senator Borah by the Twin Falls
Commercial club, this city was put
on the congressional r - ap again last
Friday by the senior senator from this
state In the course of a debate on
the bill introduced by Congressman
Addison T. Smith and Senator George
fi. Chamberlain to increase the recla
niation area of the country,
lowing passages from the Congres
sionai Record show the connection:
On the 6th of April. 1917, 1 intro
duced in the senate a bill known as S.
758. The same Bill was introduced in
The fol
it is constructive in its
I'residenl. and supple
ments and extends the purposes of
the reclamation of arid lands to the
drainage of swamp lands. 1 believe
that it senators will look it over they
will favor the enactment of this meas
ure. and if it is enacted into law it
will tend greatly to add to the agricul
turaI area ot the south as well as
the west. I hope. too. that senators
will assist : 'e in bringing that meas
ure to early consideration
Mr. Borah. Mr. President the sen
ator from Oregon (Mr. Chamberlain»
bits just referred to a hill which he
introduced in the senate some time
ago and which was also introduced in
the house by a representative from
the house by Mr. Smith of Idaho. It
was to increase the productive agrl
cultural area of the United States by
the reclamation of arid and swamp
lands therein. This bill has been re
ferred to the secretary of the interior,
and has met ( >e approval of the de
partment,
nature. 51 r.
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Program includes Bissett & Scott, Orpheum Circuit headliner dancing and
singing act—Idaho theater Friday and Saturday.
ment to the pending bill, whieh it had
been my purpose to offer. I wish to
read a telegram here from a section
ot the country which ten years ago
it was known in
P lieR of (001 ^ to our conimon country
was a barren waste,
our slate as the "desert." and it is
now a ver >' Ia rge. progressive, active
community. It has been reclaimed un
l ' er 'be arid-land laws. In my judg
ment . when you consider the t:sne in
which the community has been devel
°l )ei ' an< ' the wonderful state of dé
velopment it has reached, the Tw*n
marvelous growth and development of
the west, it shows how well it is to
take into consideration not the things
merely of a day but the permanent
things which have reference to the
building of our country and to our
It is dated Twin Falls.
falI s country is the marvel of all ine
Hon. W. E. Borah,
United States Senate.
Washington, D. C.:
Twln Falls county, with its strictly
a KficuItural population of irrigation
farmers, who have redeemed t v ? land
! from a sagebrush desert wimin ten
- vea rs. has contributed to the Red
Cross work $80,000, which is 32 per
cent of assessment placed upon entire
state - Notwithstanding the lack of
a(lef iuate water upon the Balmon riv
er segregation to the present year, the
townspeople and farmers on that se
, gregation have contributed $5000 to
ward the above fund. With proper
new legislation concerning (' strict ir
rigatlon projects partially . .implied
am1 new irr 'g ation segregations in the
west - with ,heir free ' Io:n fr om ex
tremes of storms, droughts, and fresh
ets. can be depended upon to duplicate
this effort and assure enormous sup
f°° ( l supply,
Blaho. and is as follows:
Twin Falls. Ida.. June 26.
diers, and all which the country now ;
nee( i s - j
In view of the fact that this amend- j
ment will in no wise modify or j
rhange or alter any provision of the •
uill and will in no wise delay its pas- j
sage in any way, I do not see why we |
should not be making progress in tak- |
ing care of the reclamation projects
in our arid lands.
and its allies during this great crisis.
TWIN FALLS COM. CLUB.
This only shows how these things
in a very short time come to be in
deed a sustaining part of the country,
contributing food, citizenship, sol
rental of $175 a month.
Offer Postoffice
Rnilrlinrr F/-k
DUHUing to v.liy
-
j Federal Building Co„ Would Lease
I Present Home of Postoffice for
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The Federal Building company yes
terday offered to lease the structure)
now occupied by the postotfice to the
city for five years, the lease to be
terminable on sixty days' notice at
option ot the city. The proposal was
signed "Federal Building Co., by Geo.
H. Smith," and was filed to be taken
up at the council meeting August 6.
The company made three proposl
lions. The first was for the use of
the room after repairing, painting
and tinting, at a rate of $125 a month.
The second was to add to the above
offer, light, stoves and fuel ar '
charge $150 a month. The third was
to include all set forth in the second
offer and build a modern vault for the
mfe guarding of the city bonds, at a
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NEWSPAPERS OF SOUTHERN
t a 'mtv A XT r»rvrfNr r T 1 'P v to
LAiNU WAJNi. LU U JN 1 it I 1U
, . _ . . .
I hink Further INeutral
Fact That the United States
Found Neutral Position Unten
able Urged as Reason for War
r
.o
GIVEN URUGUAY
GERMAN BREAK
FOLLOW NEIGHBORS
ity to be Impossible
On the Teu'ton.
(By John W. White, Jr., International
News Service Staff Correspondent)
BUENOS AIRES, July 26.—Newspa-i
per editorials show a growing tend
ency in this country opposed to neu
trality. Although the larger dailies of
Buenos Aires have not openly urged
the government to take a position
with the United States and Brazil in
open antagonisms to Germany's cam
paign of horror, they have done so
negatively by heartily applauding the
recently announced policy of Uruguay
and by pointing out the troubles that
are beset; ng the countrier which
cling to their neutrality at all ccsts.
The present unhappy plight ot
Spain leads El Diario to comment at
length upon neutrality in general and
I the results to whieh it leads under
suc b circumstances as have been cre
ated by the present war, narrowing its
! lengthy article later to the specific
[ case ot Spain. One reading between
the lines - as on « must do in reading
all South American editorials, finds a
i lesson drawn between the present
plight of Spain and the future posi
tion of the Argentine Republic,
Spain and other countries which
have tried to imitate its rolicy ot
str'H neutrality, says El Diario, have
learned that their policy has pleased
no one, though well intention jd to
please all. The warring nations
both sides regard its course with dis
favor, and not, a little suspic'iusness
aR to the genuineness of its protesta
«ions of neutrality, v nie su<.:i r, pol
tc" gives -ise to dissensions within
country itself hard'v less serious
than "tould bt the consequences of di
rect participation in the war.
Ever since the ministry of Roma
nones resigned declaring that it could
not maintain neutrality while the in-i
terior of the country denounced the
civil government as too neutral to suit
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the sporadic military spirit which
I'ound its first and most pronounced
expression in Barcelona, all that has
since occurred, say El DiaTio, has
come and passed as a film in a cine
matograph, and affords ample illus
trations from experience to be a warn
ing to other nations who have adopt
ed the same policy as Spain.
Commenting on the position of the>
countries which have kept apart froni
the great conflict, now that the Unit
ed States is self-eliminated from the
number, the editorial continues: "Wo
sincerely believe that there is not one
whieh has the ability to maint ain its
neutrality, however strong may be its
spirit of nationalism. When even the
United States the richest country in
the world, with a population of a hun
'Ired millions, with an industrial de
velopment superior to all the others,
and possessing all ÿie produc*- ; of the
earth which are requisite to national
existence and industry, has not been
; lbl ® to , maintain its attitude °f neu
trality. how can countr e; which lack
for ,he most part such essentials as it
enjoys, countries which are in a sit
nation of economic and financial in
ter-dependence, expect to he allowed
to isolate themselves—fo ■ ii'utrallty is
isolation—without
/r
them
exro ■
selves to Internationa! tastrophes,
among which the shorta • of food and
the prime essentials for t-cir indus
tr5es figure among the most impor
taat '
"All the other countrie which feel
that they have the same d ■ ise as af
flicted Spain," concludes ' e editor
ial, "may cure themseP <m without 1
calling in medical aid; fee remedy is
that they cease to imitate that victim
of neutrality."
w
xX Tiic In
comparai, 'u
j* Baby Food.
yfy Makes delicate
zHr ha hies healthy; keeps
V healthy babies u:ell,
Nearest to Mothers* Milk *
/
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PURI.
IIETINED. EVAPORATED
GOAT K ML K
A Perfect Food also for Ir valid*.
AT LEADING DRUGGISTS
iu. 11-oz. Tin«
WIOEMANM GOAT MILK CO.
Phyvicians Bl$. 'X"- Sfin TrancifrCoCai
$7000
4
FOR SALE!—A good farm, 153
acres. 120 acres in alfalfa and
Red clover. Good buildings.
w r ell and windmill. No rocks.
Two water payments been paid.
Take a look at the crops now.
One and one-halt miles south of
Amste. Jam, Idaho. Geo. Vriel
ing.
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