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The Twice-a-week Twin Falls times. (Twin Falls, Idaho) 1916-1918, October 18, 1917, Image 1

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THE TWICE- A-WEEK
Twin Falls Times
IF YOU ARE AFTER RESULTS
ADVERTISE IN THE TIMES.
A word in time saves ninety-nine
after the other fellow has got
your business.
VOL. XIII. NO. 4.
TWIN FALLS, IDAHO
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1917.
A/
«/.
CONCLUSION
OF HEARING
AT HOLLISTER
SALMON IRRIGATION PRO
JECT SURE OP MATERIAL
REDUCTION
How Much Not Yet
Announced
Second Full Day of Investigation
—Questions of Run-off Capacity
and Acreage Necessity Answer
ed From All Poirtl of View.
M
fv/
At the opening of Tuesday's session.
Judge Bothwell, for the Settlers' as
soc.iation, submitted a report by for
k's- truer State Engineer Robinson in 1915
» that made the "computed" average
loss in reservoir 24 per cent., instead
of 17%, as derived from the company
records, and the water available for
irrigation correspondingly smaller.
There was much comment and some
argument during the submission of
this evidence, the gist of which was
that the most reliable conclusions as
to the matter In question must be
reached by actual figures of water
taken in and turned out rather than by
any one's "computations." One great
point in the submission of the Robin
son figures was the assumption that
the reservoir reached its maximum ef
ficiency in 1913. This was controvert
ed by U. S. Land Inspector Wells, who
explained the "puddling" process that
must take place inn a reservoir filled
with water, and concluded that no
reservoir in use can be "made," or
reach its highest efficiency in less
than ten years.
A report on reservoir contents and
losses made by Enginer Jno. Birkett
also quoted by Mr. Archibald, one
was
of the government engineers, who de
clared that in his opinion the losses
must be considered only with relation
to the area of ground that was wet.
Quite a diversion was occasioned by
question from Governor Alexander
.1
with regard to a considerable quantity
of water that oozed from the sides ot
the canyon below the dam and seemed
to indicate seepage therefrom. Mr.
Waters said no such flow appeared be
fore the dam was built; and Mr. Hall
-aid that a gauge in the river below
; the dam did show a greater flow in
uns than in 1914, while much more
impounded in the later
■water was
vear.
The assistant state engineer, F. A.
Wilkie, was here called upon to give
his opinion regarding reservoir loss
es and the allied questions. In sub
stance Mr. Wilkie said that the only
safe method of arriving at reservoir
losses is from the record of Us ac
tual performance—that the method
used Monday was correct,
tical,
thought the record showed an average
available supply of from seventy-five
to eighty thousand acre feet of water
on this tract. To a question from the
A,
As a prac
proposition, he
horse-sense
to whether an allowance
governor as
should not be made from that for safe
ty, he said he thought that had been
taken care of- The losses are likely
decrease instead of increase in the
The check basin, with its sev
to
future.
enty acres of evaporation surface he
would eliminate if possible, as costly
and not necessary to the system. Had
studied how this would best be
concrete canal might be
built right through it. The canal «V»
tem can be improved b Y ^imination
especially of one to the northwest.,
A fair duty of water 1te thought to be
riable with regard o • b
and farm methods; but In his opinion
2% acre feet on this project will^ no
only be sufficient, but will P r0 ™J* n
over supply as time goes on and farm
ing is diversified. After full réclama
tlon and under best methods 1
acre feet has proved abundant. and,
will doubtless do so here. 0,1 tlie
Oakley tract it is fixed at 1% acre feet
rot
done but a
va
■In pumping propositions the increased
expense Insures more careful methods
and records, and less water is usee.
These have been made a success in
instances, but perhaps average
some
smaller crops.
Applying Mr. Wilkie's estimate ol
an average 78,000 available acre feet
of water, and a duty of 2% feet, the
Salmon project would irrigate 32.000
acres- But how about the lean year
like 1915, when only 41,657 acre feet
turned Into the canals?
Answering questions Mr.
further said he deemed 2% acre feet
liberal allowance for this project,
ml that it could be reduced under
improved management and conditions.
Saw no indications of motion or soft
ening to create increased loss in res
ei-vior. The average project has from
15 to 20 per cent non-lrrlgable land on
account of waste, roads, fences, barns
and stack yards, etc.
The question of the amount of water
necessary for successful irrigation was
a-.
Wilkie
j
then taken up with the water users,
I he directory of the association, as
representative thereof, being Inter
rogated one after another,
practicable to follow the testimony of
euch in detail, especially since each
explained to some extent the nature
of his land and crops. However, Mr.
tarter thought his own farm might do
v ith something less than 2 acre feet,
'fnensured at farmer's headgate, on
It is not
(Continued on Page 10)
^% / .; < ), l! MINUTE HEN
' " PLEASE HK Me A000
'V
•y.Washington, Oct. 14,
»
A. L. Sv»
Twin Fans, Idaho.
The four minute men arc a
mighty and potential influence
in the success of the Liberty
Loan. They did an immense
ly valuable and patriotic ser
vice in the first Liberty Loan
and I count with genuine sat
isfaction upon their enthusias
tic support and service in plac
ing the second Liberty Loan.
God speed every four minute
man in this noble work.
»
*
I

t
t
I
W. G. McADOO.
•4
TWIN FALLS
LAGGARD ON
LIBERTY LOAN
ONLY SMALL RETURNS RE
CEIVED FROM THIS COUN
TY UP TO LAST NIGHT
Meeting of Workers Is
Called for Tonight
Gathering in Every School House
Tuesday Evening for Grand
Rush on Holiday on October 24
Work Wanted Meantime.
18_
Oct.
Treasury department estimates
Liberty Loan half subscribed.
*»»»*»»*
WASHINGTON.
The above dispatch agrees in sub
stance with the unofficial estimates
returned by the International Press
Service reports from all parts of the
country, and looks flattering compar
ed with the returns received by Chair
man E. J. Pinch from this county last
evening. The returns indicate a lack
of work It is believed rather than a
lack ot disposition to "come across."
The city chairmen and workers are
called to meet tonight at 8 o'clock, at
the court house.
The following statement was issued
this morning by Chairman Finch ;
At the close of business on October
17th the banks ot Twin Falls county
had reported in subscriptions to the
Second Liberty Loan amounting to
$81,900.00 The quota for the county
is $600,000.00. This means that it this
amount is raised before October 27th
that there will have to be subscribed
the sum of $60,000.00 each day for the
remainder of the campaign. This conn
ty can reach the allotment it there
is an interest taken in this work.
Every buyer of a Liberty Bond
should be a committee ot one to see
that some other person is Induced to
invest in a bond. Let us make an ef
fort to see that there is a bond in
every home in Twin Falls county. Our
hoys have responded nobly,
slacker among them,
the bonds are oversubscribed and
make it possible to equip these men
Not a
Let us see that
tor the duties imposed upon them.
Shall we be more tender with our
dollars than we are with the lives of
these boys?
Every person who is financially able
to buy a bond and refuses to do so is
as much a slacker as the registered
who refuses to respond to the
dr £' us wake up for the next eight,
day8 and go over the top on this $600.
()01) 00 allotment .
Qn Tueaday evening. October 23rd
man
th ere will be a patriotic Liberty Bond
meeting in every school house in Twin
Falls county The day following,
Wednesday. October 24th, will be giv
en over to Liberty Bond work and the
afternoon of that day has been de
clared a ho i iday for this purpose. Lei
UH get organized at these meetings or.
Tuesday evening and complete the
canvass ot the county on the 24th
and complete our allotment.
a jj committee chairmen and all
workers on the Liberty Bond drive are
reciue8ted to meet at the court house
at jj p m tonight,
E. J. FINCH,
Chairman.
Relief Felt About
Hurt to Destroyer
Early Rumors Told of Great Injury
To Ship But This Was Contradicted
By The Official Report.
(I. N. S. Leased Wire)
WASHINGTON, Oct 18 —Secretary
of the Navy Daniels today was annxi
ously awaiting additional reports on
the torpedoelng of an American des
troyer In the European war zone. All
Information contained in Admiral
Sims' report on the incident lias been
made public by the navy department
A full written report will be forward
ed to Washington immediately by the
commander of the destroyer fleet- The
navy department, meanwhile was ex
pecting additional details on the exact
damage to the vessel by wireless.
The official report from Admi^l
Sims last night followed a day of ru
mors that a destroyer had been sunk
and a large part of the crew lost. The
nnvy department was relieved to find
that the damage and loss of life was
ret £roator.
BAKER TELLS
OF OFFENSIVE
OF THE ALLIES
I
METHODICAL ADVANCE IN
FLANDERS PROVING EF
FECTIVE IN THE WAR
French and British All
Doing Well
Typhoon Fire Compels 'the Ger
mans to Amend Their Tactics on
the Western Front and to
Yield Ground.
(I. N. S- Leased Wire)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 17—The great
value of French co-operation in the
allied offensive in Flanders during the
last few weeks is emphasized by Sec
retary of War Baker today in his
weekly review of operations on the
various European battle fronts. He
aiso comments optimistically upon the
typhoon fire of the allies' batteries
and the fact that the Ypres salient has
now become an ever extending wedge,
driving deeper and deeper into the
German lines despite desperate coun
ter attacks.
Secretary Baker's statement fol
lows;
"The allied offensive in Flanders
continues methodically.
"Assigned objectives attained with
increasing regularity indicate the ef
ficient co-ordination of operations
continued.
"Tile precision of the allied barrage
is proved by the low- casualties of
the assaulting columns.
"The deadly effect of allied artillery
fire is confirmed to us by reports
reaching us regarding the concern ol
the German high command at the new
allied 'typhoon' fire which is com
pelling the enemy to amend his tactl
eal disposition in an effort to meet
the shock of shell rained upon his
lines.
"French participation in the opera
tions in Flandex-s is the outstanding
feature of events during the past week.
"The successes attained by the
French forces operating north of the
British sector, more particularly in
neighborhood of the Houtholst
wood, have given the addied advance
in Flanders the needed elbow room,
"Breadth of front is an essential
condition for operations which are to
have far reaching results, for con
fined to a too narrow base, a really
encircling movement can
the
important
have no sustained value if along its
entire length it can be flanked by
artillery fire.
"The zone of operations in the Ypres
salient, formerly too narrow for the
proper disposition of large masses of
troops, has now, by the French co
operation and their recent successful
advance, so extended the line that
fighting in what was the Ypres sal
ient has changed in character. It is
longer to be considered a salient
but an ever extending wedge progres
sively driven into the German lines.
"The operations of the French dur
ing the past week are in fact compli
mentary to the engagement resulted
In the capture of Messines by the
British last June.
"During the engagements of the
week, the French everywhere main
tained the positions won in the face
of repeated onslaughts.
"Strong German detachments were
ordered to dislodge the French, who
hold the advance positions be
end Hategoul
These, how
h ■
now
tween the Victorie
farms east of Drabank.
j
ever, were repulsed.
"As was to be expected at this sea
son. bad weather has sofnewhat re
tarded the allied advance.
"Operations were hampered owing
to the fact that the well drained
ground of the
passed over, the advancing col
umns are confronted with the water
logged, soggy Flanders plain, which
stretches on to Roulers and beyond.
"The Infantry was further impeded
by the fact that allied artillery prep
aration has so plowed up the ground
that the terrain has been turned into
a sea of mud, making the going al
most impossible.
"Torrential rains and low lying
clouds rendered aircraft observation
difficult and under ordinary circum
stances would have caused a suspen
sion of offensive operations, but the
inclement weather has not prevented
the extension and consolidation of al
lied gains during the week.
"The enemy, as usual, counterat
tacked in force. His efforts to retake
the positions captured by the allies
have in a few Instances been success
ful but eventually they were driven
Passchendaele ridge
once
out.
"The Germans, fearing lest the al
lied advance In Flanders would be fol
lowed by a similar effort along other
sectors of the front, particularly north
of Verdun, endeavored to thwart al
lied plans by launching a powerful at
tack preceded by the usual artillery
preparation in this section.
"The enemy was able to gain a tem
porary foothold in certain advanced
French lines,
ho was driven out after some hot
fighting.
"The enemy's success was more
shortlived than was to be anticipated
when its cost is taken Into considera
Latest advices show
(Continued
Page 51
Salmon Reduced to
34,600 Acres
The TIMES opens its forms to say,
that, actinic upon recommendation of
Commissioner Tall man, the state land
board allows 34,600 acres to the Sal
mon project—provided the company
will eliminate the check basin and
west lateral.
COAL STRIKE
END NEAR
IS AVERRED
COLONEL JEFFERSON OF THE
EXECUTIVE BOARD OF
I. C. OPTIMISTIC
Appearances Still Un
favorable
Miners in Illinois Refuse to Obey
Leaders—Call Issued for Strike
in Missouri, Kansas and Okla
homa.
(I. N. S- Leased Wire)
SPRINGFIELD, Ill., Oct. 18—Illin
ois; coal strike of 35,000 miners, clos
ing more than a hundred and fifty
mines and lessening coal production
500,000 tons daily, will he over by Sat
settlement is the announcement that
Frank Farrington, president ot
Illinois United Mine Workers of Am
erica, has called a meeting of pit corn
urday.
This is the opinion of Colonel J. W.
Jefferson, chairman of the executive
board of the central Illinois coal op
erators association this afternoon.
Colonel Jefferson declines to dis
close Ills source of information, de
claring he is not at liberty to do so at
present.
Reiterating the belief of an early
the
mittees of the 300 local unions of the
state to be held in Springfield Fri
day. Farrington, who is in Chicago
today is expected to return here late
tonight.
CHICAGO, Oct. 18—Unyielding in
the face of postive orders from Frank
Farrington, president of the Illinois
Federation of miners and threats of
United States
by
drastic measures
Fuel Administrator Garfield, striking
of the Illinois coal fields to
m<ners
day are showing no disposition to re
turn to work until their demands are
granted.
Conscription of labor to operate the
mines in order that a
throughout the middle west may be
inerted is regarded by coal operators
today as possible unless the striking
miners agree to return to work with
in a few days.
fuel famine
KANSAS CITY, Mo.. Oct. 18 Firm
in their determination to call out 40,
000 coal miners in Missouri, Kansas
and Oklahoma, the presidents of the
union miners of those states adjourn
ed a conference here this afternoon
with the repeated statement that the
must quit work tomorrow unless
men
the operators recede from their ulti
matum.
The ultimatum is that the arbitrary
penalty clause In agreements between
operators and miners must be en
forced.
Markets Generally
Lower Is Report
NEW YORK. Oct. 18. —Copper un
Spelter easy; spot 7%®
changed.
and Dec. 8®8%c. Tin
8%c; Nov.
steady: spot [email protected]%c; lead dull: spot
offered at 7c; Nov. and Dec. offered
6®6%c. Stocks generally are lower.
UNION STOCK YARDS. ILL., Oct.
17,000,
Mixed and butch
[email protected] 17.75 ; good heavy. $16.10®
[email protected];
market
18.—Hogs—Receipts
dull and 25c lower.
ers,
17.70; rough heavy,
light, [email protected]; pigs. [email protected];
bulk. $16.40® 17.50.
Cattle—Receipts 12,000; weak to 10c
Beeves. $6.75® 17.10; cows and
heifers, $4.95® 12.10; stockers and
feeders, [email protected]; Texans. $5.90®
lower.
13.60; calves. [email protected]
Sheep—Receipts
Native and western. $9.10®
16,000; market
steady.
13; lambs, $13® 18.25.
KANSAS CITY. MO., Oct. 18.—Cat
4,000; market slow,
tie—Receipts
steady, to unevenly low. Steers $10®
16; cows and heifers, [email protected]; stock
ers and feeders. [email protected]; calves, $6®
12.75.
Hogs—Receipts 5.000; market 25®
50c lower; top, $17.75; bulk. $16®
17.26;
diums, [email protected] ; lights. $16®17.
Sheep—Receipts 10,000; mostly feed
$17.40® 17.75 ;
heavies,
me
ers and breeders; market slow steady
to 25c lower; lambs, [email protected]; ewes,
[email protected] ; wethers. $12; feeders dull
and lower.
CHICAGO, Oct. 18.—Cash grain —
Corn No. 2 mixed $1.93®1.94%; No. 2,
yellow, $1.94%@1.96; No. 3. mixed,
$1.93%; No. 3, yellow, $1.94%® 1.95.
Oats—No. 2, mixed. [email protected]%c; No. 2.
white. 60%@61c; No. 3. white. 59%®
61c; No. 4, white. [email protected]%c.
TOLEDO. OHIO. Oct. 18.—Clover
seed prime cash, old. $14.75; new and
Oct. $15.25; Dec. $14.95; Jan. $15.06;
Feb. $15.15; March, 15.05.
SECOND CONVICTION
IN JARBIDGE MURDER
Elko, Nev., Oct. 17
Times. Twin Falls, Idaho
Second conviction secured in
Jarbidge murder. Beck found
guilty of murder in the first
degree. Punishment placed at
life. Jury out two hours.
t
I
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I
Third suspect. McGraw, re
leased this morning from cus
today on ground of insuffici
ent evidence.
I
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t
He took stand
and testified for state in the
Beck case.
I
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t
Next case that of Cullen, in
Jarbidge shooting.
t
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E. M. STENIGER.
Free Press
<
»
»

McClure's Visit of
Interest to Many
s. s.
McClure, the noted lecturer,
writer and editor of McClure's maga
zine, is to appear in Twin Falls on
Thursday evening of next week in
Hu- Twin Falls high school auditor
ium.
Mr.
McClure just
month from Europe, Japan and China,
where he has been
months investigating conditions there
returned this
spending six
and the attitude of the common peo
ple toward the United States, especl
ally regarding the question of war be
tween Japan and the United States. He
has gathered especially interesting
matter in Japan, where he visited and
lectured before leading universities
and other educational institutions and
interviewed government officials and
others in all walks of life. Some of
these interviews are very striking,
and are especially vital arid interest
ing at tliis time, owing to the recent
visit to the United States of the Jap
enese mission.
Mr. McClure landed in San Fran
cisco last week and at once began his
lectures.
This noted man is famed not only
toi his establishment and building of
McClure's magazine, but for his bring
ing into prominence such writers as
Rudyard Kipling. Conan Doyle, Ida M.
Tarbell and others. He was also first
editor of Outing Magazine and has
held a prominent place in the first
ranks of American literature- Ho is a
searching investigator and a most
pleasing and entertaining speaker.
His lecture here on Thursday evening,
October 25 promises to be one of the
most interesting ever heard in the
city. Tickets are on sale at the Ma
jestic pharmacy and Skeels-Wiley
drug store.
Minutes Are Not
Yet Certified Up
Secretary Taylor Says He Will Act As
Soon As lie Gets The Certification
to Do So.
Asked by a Times reporter this
morning whether the action of the
canal company stockholders at their
recent meeting had been duly certi
fied to the county auditor, Secretary
W. O. Taylor replied that he had not
made such certification for the rea
son that the action of the meeting
had not yet been officially certified
to him. He said that he had received
a memorandum which he took to be
the minutes of the meeting, and
which was such, but he did not know
it to be so. He said that it was the
| the meeting to transcribe the result
I of the -meeting into the mintue book
a nd to make authentication of action
Uiken. Up to the present this had not
been done.
stood that the minute book was lock
ed up with other data. Secretary Tay
lor stated that he had personally, as
secretary of the canal company, never
transcribed any proceedings into the
minute book of the stockholders and
would not do so under any circum
stances as he had no authority to do
duty of the chairman and secretary of
He said that he under
so.
Many inquiries have been made at
the office of the TIMES regarding the
time for certification of the result of
the stockholders meeting since the
publication in full in the TIMES' col
umns on October 7, of the opinion of
Judge J. R. Bothwell, attorney for
the company to the effect that It was
the duty ot the board of directors to
certify to he action taken by the meet
ing without inquiry into the legality
of such action, provided that it were
done in regular form. Times readers
will recall that In connection with
the publication of the above opinion,
was also published a copy of a letter
sent by Secretary Taylor to President
John E. White of the farm bureau in
which it was stated by Mr. Taylor that
"The new by-laws will be considered
to be the law of the company as far
as the action of the board is concern
ed."
Argentine Ready
to Meet Germany
Settlement of Strike Puts It Up To
ITesideni To Break Teutonic Re
lations.
(I. N. S- Leased Wire)
BUENOS AIRES, Oct. 18—Now that
the railway strike has been settled, it
was reported today In circles close to
the cabinet that the government will
Immediately make a definite decision
wards Germany. As the situation
stands, it is now up to President
Irlgoyen to act upon the congression
al resolution calling for a break with
Germany.
KAISER SAYS
GERMANY WILL
KEEP ALSACE
WILL NOT TURN PROVINCES
TO FRANCE UNLESS SHE
TAKES THEM
Germans Fail to Break
French Lines
Russian Battleship Sunk in De
fending- Position — Wreckage
Indicates That German Battle
ship Also Sunk,
*
*
>
NEW MUTINY IN
GERMAN NAVY REPORT
(L N. S. Leased Wire)
AMSTERDAM, Oct. 18.—A
new mutiny in the German
navy-—this time at the subma
rine base «Î Ostend, on the
Belgian coast—has broken out,
according to the newspaper,
Dagblud.
The mutineers, it. was said,
were conscripts drafted for
service on submarines.
Between 25 and 35 sailors
were arrested and taken to
Bruges for court martial.
»
(I. N. S. Leased Wire)
THE HAGUE. Oct. 18.—A dispatch
from Berlin today places the kaiser
on record as saying that Germany
will not give up Alsace Lorraine to
France unless they are taken by
force of arms. Karl Rosno. war cor
respondent of the Berlin Lokal An
zeiger, who accompanied the kaiser
to Constantinople telegraphed an ac
count of the luncheon on the trip
east. The kaiser had just finished
reading an account of the speech of
Premier Painleve, of France, in which
the premier said France would fight
until Alsace-Lorraine were restored.
"Good." the kaiser was quoted as
saying. "So. Mr. Painleve wants Al
sace-Lorraine. But he must come and
take them then. His loud sounding
phrases are without reason."
PARIS, Oct. 18.—An attempt by the
Germans to break through the French
lines near Bezonviaux on the Verdun
front, was repulsed, the war office re
ported today. Cannonading was re
ported from other sections of the
Verdun fighting front and also from
the Aisne river section and the Eng
lish lines are being shelled.
AMSTERDAM, Oct. 18.—German
sailors who took part In the recent
mutiny at Wilhelmshaven have been
sent to the western front to fight in
the trenches according to information
from a German source today.
PETROGRAD. Oct. 18.—The Rus
sian battleship Slava has been sunk
in a sea battle with the Germans at
the entrance to the Gulf of Riga, the
war office announced today. Near
ly all of the Slava's crew of 825 men
were saved. At one time 55 German
men of war were seen, the official
statement said. The war office an
nounced also that all of Oesel Island
is now in possession of the Germans
but added that the Russians destroy
ed everything of military importance
before retiring.
PARIS. Oct. 18.—Heavy air fight
ing in which 18 German machines
were shot down, raged all day yes
terday on the western front, accord
ing to the communique issued by the
war office at noon. For the second
time in 24 hours the Germans again
raided Nancy last night. There were
30 machines in the attacking fleet.
There were some civilian casualties.
French airmen threw down bombs up
on German military works at Mezieres,
Conrcelles. Koveaut and Thionville.
18.—Many
Oct.
bodies of German sailors were wash
ed ashore from the sound today. They
are believed to be from a German war
ship which has been sunk.
COPENHAGEN.
LaFollette Balks
Committee Action
Investigation Adjourned Until No
vember 26—Will Remain in Wash
ington During Recess.
(I. N. S. Leased Wire)
WASHINGTON. Oct. 17.—Balked by
Senator LaFollette's refusal to ap
pear. the senate committee Investigat
ing his St. Paul speech today adjourn
ed the probe until November 26.
Because of the developments of yes
terday. said a statement by Senator
Pomerene. the chairman has thought
it best to seek information from other
sources.
Senator LaFollette will remain in
Washington until the December ses
sion opens.
GOVERNMENT OWNERSHIP
Oct.
18.—Public
ownership of railroads, telephone and
telegraph lines as a military advant
age and an economic improvement is
approaching rapidly, says a special
report to the N. A. R. commissioners
here today.
WASHINGTON.

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