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The Twice-a-week Twin Falls times. (Twin Falls, Idaho) 1916-1918, January 10, 1918, Image 9

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IS REAL AMERICAN WONDER
Newly Examined Glacier In an Unex
plored Region May Be Biggest
In the Rockies.
Wo had reached a point of vantage
Whence we could overlook the whole
of the unexplored region of the
Rockies from Laurier Pass on the
south to the Liard region on the
north. No great secret could be con
!
taller than
cenled from us.
What did we see?
A glance showed ns that there was
no heaven-kissing peak
Mount Robson," writes Paul L. Ha
worth in Scribner's Magazine.
But there were several magnificent
mountains higher than any along the
Finlay. Much the finest «f all these
lay far to the northeastward. It was
a vast affair with three great sum
mits, two of them peaks, the third and
tallest an Immense square block.
This mountain was big enough to
have aroused our enthusiasm, and yet
we gave comparatively scant heed to
I

it.
Far down the south slope of it, fill
ing a great valley miles and miles
wide, there flowed a perfectly im
mense, glistening glacier.
"That is what makes the Quadacha
white," Joe conceded.
There could be no doubt about It.
For a long time I had realized that it
would require a good-sized rock mill
to grind up enough silt to color such
a big stream as the Quadacha, but |
where was a mill big enough for the
Job?
Wo were at least forty miles from
It, for we were not fully twenty miles
west of the works, and from the forks
to the glacier must be at least twenty
more. We were eight ns one must
travel in that region. Yet there that
great white mass loomed up far and
away the most notable'phenomenon in
that whole magnificent panorama. It
Is the biggest thing In the whole Fin
lay country. I venture to predict that
when the glacier has been more closely
examined it will be found to be one of
the biggest, if not the very biggest,
in the whole Rocky Mountain system.
BEAUTY IS NOT LOVELINESS
Women May Possess Both Qualifica
tions, but a Combination Is
Rarely to Be Found.
"Beauty," at least as distinct from
"loveliness," is a big word, writes Mar
garet Steele Anderson in Louisville
Post. It has a certain splendor, it has
a certain amplitude. You use it for
the great things of the world ; for the
Parthenon and the lost chryselephan
tine five of Jove rfhd of Athene; for
the epics of Homer and Milton, ns for
Troy and the first host of Lucifer; for
the music of Bach and Beethoven ; 1
for the face of Helen and the body of
Brunhllda or of Siegfried.
T > llf "i rt . rrkT |„ rt0 -.M , Q 0
™ 'J n
word a smaller word and slighter, a
word more delicate, more tender. It
applies .0 the more human things. |
Helen Is not lovely, she Is beautiful ■ |
but, with rare exceptions, the women
of Shakespeare have a certain appeal
lug loveliness. Juliet Is lovely, for all
her streng h and courage ; the lovell
ness of Rosalind Is piquant and that
of Beatrix also; Miranda's Is a wild
and timid loveliness, that of Desde
rnona is most tender, that of Ophelia
most tragical and touching. Portia,
too, Is lovely and Olivia—though these
two, we admit, do barely escape being
beauties: Viola, like Celia, has a sort
of dainty loveliness, while Cordelia,
Lear's daughter Cordelia, is as lovely
ns Juliet herself.
White-Breasted Nuthatch.
The familiar winter bird, the white
breas'ed nuthatch, Is the champion
"steeplejack" of the world, says an
exchange. It can travel headforemost
down any tree trunk In the forest and
can perform other dizzy gymnastic
feats with astounding ease. The nut
hatch makes nothing of thrillers.
The winter hawks occasionally try
to catch asleep this weasel of a bird.
The nuthatch, however, can scuttle
around a tree trunk, thrice outpacing
the squirrel at the same trick. The
bird braves the bitter cold, and if it
knew how It probably would hearten
us In the winter days with something
more cheerful than "Quank, quank."
It does not know how, however, and
so we must take it for Its beauty and
Sea-Lion Performer*.
Any boy who has gone to a circus
knows what remarkable "stunts" sea
lions can perform—human beings can't
do some of them. There Is, of course,
the trick of balancing a big ball on
their snouts and tossing It from one to
another in that way. The sea-lion or
chestra Is not particularly musical, but
the animals can create an awful din
by means of horns, drums and bells.
The more clever of them can walk up
b ladder and down, with a baton on
their snout ; while others roll over or
dive when there is a tank. Each train
er tries new tricks with hla lions, mak
ing sure at first that he can do all the
most common ones. ''
its society and let the rçst go.
Historic Pennant Sold.
An interesting relic was sold in
Glasgow the other day. It was the
old yellow silk pennant of the Earls
of Marcbmont, on which are the St,
Andrew's cross, the lion rampant, and
other heraldic devices. The pennant
is in a fragile condition and is thought
to date back to the fourteenth or flf
It is satisfactory to
i' » this interesting relic of an
purchased by a Scots«
e will remain ifl
teenth century.
Their Eggs Might Help.
Ostriches In Summer will live al
most entirely on green alfalfa, and In
winter consume each about a pound of
grain and three pounds of alfalfa hay
a day. It would seem therefore that
the sale of eggs might go a long way
toward paying for the upkeep of the
flocks. Ostriches thrive In the dry
and sandy southwest, and upon alfalfa,
which is very easily raised in that re
gion wherever Irrigation Is possible.
The average yearly yield of feathers
from an ostrich is a little over n
pound and their value in 1910 was
$20 to $30.
The "Rain Tree."
For many years even scientists be
lieved that there actually was a mar
velous tree called the 'Tain tree,"
which had the power of collecting the
dampness of the atmosphere and of
condensing it Into a continuous and
copious fall of rain. To this power
ascribed the tree's ability to wlth
was
stand long droughts. It is true, how
ever, that the leaf of the "rain tree"
as it is sometimes called, "the
—or,
traveler's tree"—has a large sheaf at
the base, In which water collects, but
it is only a mouthful or so.
Caterpillars Travel In Companies.
The caterpillar, according to natu
ralists, knows that there is safety In
numbers, and whole companies may be
found feeding side by side while keep
j n g a sharp lookout for their bird cn
emles; but when a caterpillar is by
Mmself he scarcely dares move for
fear of attracting attention. Even
when he is obliged to change his skin
he does not venture to leave his old
coat lying around. The moment ho
takes It off he eats it.
Loss of Arabian Literature.
Arabian literature, had it not suf
fered mutilation, would have remained
a treasure house for the scholars of
all lands. The disastrous fire at the
Escurlal, in 1671, probably inspired by
bigotry, by which 8,000 volumes, most
ly Arabian chronicles, were destroyed,
was probably a greater loss than the
burning of the Alexandrian library,
.caused by the Mohammedans.

Psychology.
Psychology is now recognized as a
science, and is said to have originated
with Pythagoras. Aristotle greatly
Improved It and stated its most im
portant principle, that of the associa
tion of ideas. It deals with the phe
nomena, states and modifications of
the human mind.
World's Largest Bridge.
The longest wagon bridge in the
worl(1 10,302 feet In length, ci osses an
flrin of Lake ? ODd d .° r f 1 ® t " nd ;
point, Idaho. It required 1,804,1 . oet
lumber, which included 2,748 cedar,
<lr " ml tamarack piling, the combined
ht f h , h wa8 approximately
" ^ D0Unds .
' ' *
Feast Ends the Case.
Labor disputes are often settled In
China by a chamber of commerce, and
after the award has been made all the
parties concerned take part In a feast
which Is paid for by the side which
bag W on the decision.
_,
Spike-Covered Mountain.
There is n huge mountain nearPachu
C a, Mexico, which has the appearance
0 f being covered with spikes. They
are natural formations of rock, tlu
origin of which Is somewhat Involved
in mystery.
i
j
1
hat to that girl? You don't know her,
do you?
brother does, and this Is his hat."—
Can Check Hunger.
According to an Italian physician,
the channel from the mouth to the
stomach is the seat of Jhe senses of
hunger and thirst, which he claims to
have suppressed by cocaine injections.
Oil From Palm Trees.
It is proposed to start a new Indus
try in British Honduras for the pro
duction of oil from the cohumo palm,
which grows proliflcally In that coun
try.
All In the Family.
Ethel—"Why did you take off your
Prank—"No— er —but my
Puck *
; -
Larka Not F|rgt Cut
Scientific investigation has ruined
. {he lark - g reputat j on for parly rising,
It has been demonstrated that there
, nre b i rda whlch are out befora
tb0 larkg
'
|
Dampness.
a few drops of lavendar scattered
.through a bookcase In a closed room
will save a library from mold In damp
■weather.
You're Next, Sir.
Revolving brushes, operated by t
hand lever, clean a man's hat and
shoes at the same time In a machine
|
designed for public places.
Good Recruiters.
A coquette, like a recruiting sep
géant, Is ever on the lookout for fres'
victims.—Douglas Jerrold.
Protects Desk Tops.
A pressed cardboard cover to proteci
the tops of desks is the invention of 1
California school Janitor.
I
STATE ENGINEERS' REPORT
State Board of Land Commissioners,
Boise, Ida., Dec. 7th, 1917.
Capitol Building, Boise, Idaho.
Gentlemen: As per your request
0 ( March 12th this year, relative to
c , xces8 tve losses in main canals of the
T W j n Falls Canal Company:
The investigation during the past
season was conducted on the South
Side project, by Mr. W. N. McCon
nell, hydrographer in the employ of
this department, between August
28th and September 14th, 1917.
MAIN CANAL.
Loss Pet. Loss
From
Sta.
To
Dist.
Miles
Upper
Dlsch.
Divers.
Sec. Ft. Sec. Ft. Per Mile. Per Mile.
Lower
Disch.
Loss
Remarks.
Sta.
Diff.
0.31
1.46
0.29
0.14
0.64—Lowline heading.
Total length—26.6 miles. Total loss—368.64 Sec. Ft. Average loss per mile—13.86 Sec. Ft. Per cent loss
—12.34. Per cent per mille —0.46.
7.70
11.15
16.40
20.80
26.60
7.7
2986.20
2899.60
2725.30
2663.60
2646.90
86.60
174.30
71.80
106.60
325.0
16.10
28.70
29.78
90.64
230.44
9:16
42.20
8.00
3.62
16.30
0
2899.60
2725.30
2653.60
2646.9
2221.9
70.60
145.60
42.02
15.96
94.66
■Murtaugh Lake,
Area 900 Ac.
3.45
6.25
4.40
5.80
7.7
11.16
16.40
20.80
HIGH LINE CANAL.
Loss Pet. Loss
Upper
Disch.
Divers.
Sec. Ft. Sec. Ft. Per Mile. Per Mile.
Loss
To
Dist.
Miles
Lower
Disch.
From
Sta.
Remarks.
Diff.
Sta.
.66
.40—Gain caaused by
seepage from
land above.
6.78
3.77
8.11
95.60
3.40
67.00
66.67
13.20
18.36
28.93
9.80
48.64
1031.30
936.80
969.60
936.80
932.40
902.50
25.9
30.9
33.5
30.9
33.5
39.6
6.0
2.6
.84
6.0
. 09—Gain.
867.30
777.70
763.40
686.90
708.20
475.1
347.30
35.20
89.60
24.30
66.60
21.30
233.10
127.80
38.96
67.80
17.00
46.78
22.76
184.36
116.92
3.76
31.80
7.30
19.72
1.46
48.76
10.88
.84
4.6
902.60
867.30
777.70
763.40
686.90
708.20
476.30
44.0
48.3
61.3
64.4
66.7
62.0
67.0
Total length—41.1 miles. Total loss—-196.02 less 16.02, or 181.0 Sec. Ft.
Ft. Per cent loss—17.63. Per cent loss per mile—0.43.
39.5
44.0
48.3
61.3
64.4
66.7
62.0
.86
7.40
2.43
6.34
0.63
9.20
2.20
4.3
. 31
3.0
.84
3.1
.09—Gain, from Sal
1.30
2.3
mon Tract.
6.3
.46
6.0
Average loss per mile—4.62 Sec.
LOW LINE CANAL.
Divers. Loss
Diff. Sec. Ft. Sec. Ft. Per Mile. Per Mile. Remarks.
j Pet. Loss
Upper
Disch.
Lower
Disch.
Dist.
Miles
To
From
Sta.
Sta.
1268.0 '
1098.7
1051.6
1022.7
926.78
907.10
666.0
497.4
401.0
206.0
169.3
47.1
28.9
95.92
37.48
352.10
67.60
96.40
180.60
68.1
162.26
24.10
20.64
70.04
14.06
311.62
38.78
47.40
184.23
68.16
17.04
23.00
8.26
26.88
23.42
40.68
18.82
49.00
3.73
10.06
7.10
9.68
2.60
6.02
8.08
6.88
6.72
13.61
1.86
1.90
0.66
0.87
0.24
0.69
0.87
0.76
1.21
2.70
. 46—Gain.
.93—Gain,rain all p.m
1098.7
1061.6
1022.7
926.78
889.30
565.00
497.4
401.0
220.5
146.9
2.4
26.6
29.0
31.4
34.7
39.0
41.9
47.8
60.6
54.2
56.2
Total length—34.9 miles. Total loss—206.00, less 13.78, or 192.22 Sec. Ft. Average loss per mile—5.60 Sec.
Ft. Per cent loss—15.16. Per cent loss per mile—0.43.
29.0
31.4
34.7
39.0
41.9
47.8
60.6
64.2
66.2
61.5
2.4
3.3
4.3
2.9
6.9
2.8
3.6
2.0
6.3
RECAPITULATION.
Total Loss
Sec. Ft.
Total Length
Miles.
Ave. Loss Per
Sec. Ft.
Per Cent
Loss.
Per Cent Loss
Per Mile.
Name.
368.64
181.00
192.22
26.6
41.1
34.9
13.86
4.42
6.60
12.34
17.63
16.16
0.46
0.43
0.43
Main ....
High Line
Low Line
741.86
Per cent loss, average—24.
102.6
Total
87.
. „ . „„ 1017
Jerome, Sept. 22, 1917.
RE: Seepage Investigation, Twin
Falls South Side Canal,
Mr. J. H. Smith. State Engr.,
Boise, Idaho.
Dear Sir: Pursuant to your re
quest, I started seepage inVestlga
tions, on the Twin Falls South Side
canal, August 15, at Milner, but as
tbe water could not be held steady at
Milner, owing to work being done on
tbe d am , and could not b? controlled
a t the spillway on the main canal, I
had t0 defer the work till August 27,
when we started again. Then came
tbe fall in tbe rjver w e then took
the work at M ilner on the main
canal September 4 and continued
thr b to the last Htat ion on the
l QW Line canal tbe head at Milner
rema i n j n g fairly constant at about
3000 Sec. Ft.
canal.
station just above the Forks and had
been (a bout halt mile), but the crew
Mr. Porterfield sent out to repair the
stations overlooked this one, and I
had no time to do it myself, hence
the lon g distance—and in this sec
tlon too. It is impossible for a sta
tion immediately below the forks on
t he High Line, on account of the con
trolling gates, or on the Low Line,
which has a fall of 90 degrees In
a bout half a mile and has a mean
All stations are numbered accord
ing to the distance from the initial
point—Milner: for instance Milner to
Station M. (Main), 7.7, or 7.7 miles;
or Milner to H. (High Line) 29.5, or
25.9 miles from Milner.
Murtaugh Lake is between stations
M. 7.7 and M. 11.16, a distance of
3.46 miles, which has an area of ap
proximately 900 acres at this stage of
the canal, hence the loss of 146.6 Sec.
Ft. in this section.
We always went to the station
measured last the next morning and
if there had been any change in the
gage we made another measurement,
thereby holding as near as possible
a constant head during the day.
The distance to the first station
(H. 26.9) on the High Line and the
first station (25.6) on the Low Line
are included as part of the main
There should have been a
velocity of 4.23 Sec. Ft. at the station
(L. 26.6) 1.2 mile below the gates.
The gain between Station H. 30.9
and H. 33.6 I believe is due to see
page into the canal from irrigation on
Creek lands, Immediately
Rock
above the High Line canal through
this section. As we had found a gain
in this section, Mr. Porterfield want
ed us to make a test measurement, as
he said Mr. Bark had found a gain
through there, too; so he wanted me
to verify my measurement. (I think
he wanted It for a board meeting), so
before finishing the Lw Line we mea
sured the first three stations on the
High Line.
Between stations H. 30.9 and H.
33.5. we again found a gain, but a
The results obtained are tabulated
in the following pages.
It will be noted that in the Main
canals there Is an average loss of 26
per cent. It was Impossible to place
men in the field for the purpose of
localizing the excessive losses for the
competent
hydrographers
reason
were not to be had; and, again, the
department's funds are not sufficient
to stand the strain.
The average loss of ££ per cent
above referred to is not excessive
smaller gain with a higher gage, the
first gain being 9.8 Sec. Ft. and the
last being 4.66 Sec. Ft. This I think
was caused by the seepage from the
land above gradually draining out, ir
rigation having ceased, according to
Mr. Porterfield, some time prior to
our first measurement there.
The gain shown between Stations
H. 39.5 and H. 44.0 can not be ac
cording to Mr. Orville Perris, who
measured all openings (except cou
lees and larger laterals which we
measured), and measured all return
flow. He claims there was no return
Iflow in this section, so the only way
I can account for It is that I made
an error in my readings at this sta
lion, as there was considerable loss in
the next section, although not exces
sive, and may have been at the sta
tion above, where a larger loss shows
Total loss in the Main Canal.
Loss in the Main Canal, per
Per cent loss In the Main Canal.
Per cent loss in the Main Canal per
Total loss in the High Line
Loss in the High Line Canal per
Per cent loss In the High Line
Per cent loss in the High Line Canal
Total loss In the Low Line
Loss in the Low Line Canal, per
Per cent loss In the Low Line Canal
Per cent loss in the Low Line Canal
Total loss In the Main, High Line and
Per cent loss in the three is
,in the section than below. The gain
in this section of 14.4 6 Sec. Ft., or
2.1 of 1 per cent per mile, is ac
counted for by the seepage from the
Salmon River tract Immediately
above, there being no return flow.
This may be In excess, as you will
note between Stations H. 66.7 and H.
62.0 the loss seems excessive, al
though the loss between Stations H.
62.0 and 67.0 seems too small.
I
know that Station H. 62.0 was a very
poor treasuring section, being a wood
truss wagon bridge, with stay rods
underneath, which was under water
on the lower side, and considerable
drift was hanging, which we were
unable to loosen; hence if I had made
an error in my reading above, which
looks quite probable, I would not
have detected It here. As I explain
ed to Mr. Porterfield, It was a hard
proposition to localize losses or gains
In certain sections with a ''once over"
measurement, but on the whole It
would show the losses or gains quite
closely, for if an error had been
made in the readings at one station it
would be picked up at the next or the
next owing to the condition of the
stations. Mr. Porterfield said it was
the entire loss they wanted to aVrive
at, at this time, instead of the local,
yet they would like to know the sec
tions which had the greater losses in.
compared with other projects of
similar nature.
It Is tb be noted that no Investiga
tion of the distributing system was
conducted, as no request for this was
made.
I am attaching herewith copy of
Mr. McConnell's report to this de
partment covering his observations
and conduct of the work as carried
Very truly yours,
(Signed) J. H. SMITH,
State Engineer.
on.
rained hard most of the • afternoon
while he was getting his measure
ments. The land above the Low Line
is all under irrigation
length,
The Low Line station between L.
60.6 and L. 64.2 seems a little exces
sive, especially when a small gain
shows up in the next section, but that
might be due to seepage from land
above, as Mr. Ferris says he was
quite sure he got all the return flow
In this section. I think he must have
overlooked some return between sta
tions L. 66.2 and L. 51.6, (the last
station on the Low Line) as that sec
tion shows a gain of 10.0 Sec. Ft. this
seems quite probable, as the sweet
clover is quite heavy here, and It
its entire
The following shows the final re
suits of the Investigation:
mile.
mile . .
368.74 Sec. Ft.
14.07 Sec. Ft.
12.35
.47
Canal.
mile.
Canal.
per mile
mile.
.
per mile
Low Line canals Is 697.12 Sec. Ft.
23.35
136.25 Sec. Ft.
3.32 Sec. Ft.
13.21
.32
192.12 Sec. Ft.
6.60 Sec. Ft.
16.16
.43
There is, of course, considerable
loss in the company laterals and cou
lees used as the distributing system
that we did not get, hence the losses
shown in this report are not by any
means the losses In the system.
Mr. Porterfield would have liked
very much to have had the losses in
the distributing system, also, to ar
rive at a conclusion of the entire
loss, but I did not have the time to
1 spare from the North Side work,
un
less I had orders from you, and as I
understood you my Investigations
were to cover the main canals, I felt
I was through with the field work
there.
All
notes were carefully
checked.
Respectfully submitted,
W. N. McCONNEL.
Let Us Print Your
*
When it comes to neat
«and effective printing
of any Kind we will
guarantee to give you
satisfaction.
Amethyst's Colors.
A man recently brought back to a
Jewelry store three rings set with ame
thysts which had faded to a pale yel
low within a few months after he had
bought them. He then discovered that
Instead of amethysts the gems were
topazes. The latter vary In color from
pale yellow to deep violet and purple.
Under high temperatures amethysts
change color, becoming first yellow,
then green, and finally entirely color
less.
however, genuine amethysts do not
change color.
Under ordinary temperatures,
I
Greatest Thing in the World.
Love has been called the greatest
thing in the world, but the greatest
thing in the world Is not a thing at
all ; the greatest thing is a person.
Personality is the greatest thing in
the world. The greatest thing in per
sonality is not strength of body nor
strength of mind. It Is strength of
heart.
ns blackberries, the rare things to
find a good one.
Webster's brain, but Lincoln's heart,
that wins a nation's love.—Exchange.
Clever people are as common
It Is not Daniel
Optimism.
To face the changing fortunes of
ilfe with equanimity, to brace our
selves against the shocks of fortune,
to learn to smile at pretentiousness,
to cultivate poise in the face of losses,
to let no scarcity in the non-essentials
touch our inner repose, to adjust our
sense of value so that we need not
miss what wo do not need—these may
be the fortunate by-products of our
first lessons in the art of doing with
out.—Exchange.
The Sandwich Man,
The n»me ÿsandwlch man," as ap
plied to the^men who parade the
streets between two boards, on which
are advertisements, was first given to
them by Dickens. Although It would
appear that the custom originated in
the nineteenth century, the profession
1
was without a name until Dickens
conceived the humorous title, which he
first employed in his "Sketches by
Boz.
The Leap of the Black Bass.
The leap of the black bass is always
directly upward when hooked, and he
generally falls tall first into the water.
At times, however, this fish, like the
trout, will rise vigorously to the fly
and, missing it, will make a graceful
curve In the air ere he goes quietly
head down back to his element. But
as a rule the bass rises fiercely to the
fly with an accurate aim, and goes
Instantly to his lair.—All Outdoors.
That'« About All.
Pandora was an extraordinary créa-,
iture. Every young woman Is. She
will still, however, a young woman—
that is to say, a mixture of timidity
and boldness, of prudery and shame
lessness, of divine kindness and cold
cruelty of yonthfulness, and especially;
of profound knowledge and abysmal.
Ignorance.—Exchange.
From Gosslptown.
There's alius tongues wagging;
nothing you can lay hold on, you know,
but that's no help. I'd rather some
body say I'd a wooden leg straight out
than go hinting there was something
funny about me figure.—J. B. Buck
rose.
Plenty of Company.
It usually takes 80 years to reap
what It took 30 minutes to sow in the
wild oat crop, and a hundred men
often take part In the reaping of what
one little fellow sowed. No man sow
eth or moweth wild oats to himself.
—Exchange.
i
Fight It Out Now.
You cannot run away from a weak
ness; you must sometime fight It out
or perish, and If that be so, why not
now and where you stand?— B. L. Ste
venson.
Serviceable Infant.
"Mama," cried Sue, "Bess and I are
playing house and want babe for a
baby, but the boys have got him for a
bulldog.
Plenty to Do.
Medical Friend—"Now that you
have a car, you must not neglect your
exercise.
Is a second-hand car."—Life.
Oh, we won't, doctor. This
• I
Take Warning.
Don't brag. In a few years from
now somebody else will be filling your
place and maybe filling It just a little
better.—Exchange.
New Box Carrier.
A new book carrier made of flexible
material has pockets in its inner sides
into which the covers of a book may
be Inserted and extension handles. '
Sharpening Shears.
When scissors get blunt, sharpen 1
them by opening and moving backward
and forward on a piece of glass.
Respectability.
The more things a man Is ashamed
of, says George Bernard Shaw, the
more respectable he Is.
Just One. \
After all there Is but one rac«—hu
manity, wrote George Moora.
1

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