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The Twice-a-week Twin Falls times. (Twin Falls, Idaho) 1916-1918, April 09, 1918, Image 1

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Crush Germany; Savk America; buy liberty bonds?
THE TWICE-A-WEEK
•'—■c
Times
If It's too good to throw
away and not good enough
to sell, trade it through
a Times Classified ad.
& T
Phone or mail your wants
to the TIMES. It is THE
advertising medium of
Twin Falls County
: t L à
——
4>~
- - %
VOL. Xlll. NO. 53.
TWIN FALLS, IDAHO.
TUESDAY, APRIL 1). 1918.
MEXICAN WAR
ON Ü. S. THE
HUN OBJECTIVE
ORGANIZATIONS STRIVE TO
STIR UP TROUBLE BE
TWEEN THE NATIONS
Clergymen Often Used
by Kaiser Agents
Several Organizations Indicted by j
Dr. Sperry as Being Under Pay ;
of Germany—Jeremiah O'Leary |
Said to be Go-Between.
\
WASHINGTON, April 9.—Germany
is today carrying on a campaign to
embroil the United States and Moxl
accordlng to testimony ottered be
fore a sub-committee of the senate
judiciary committee today by
Bari Sperry, of Syracuse university.
There is a German organization in
Mexico TTow which lias for its sole
purpose the causing of war between
the United States and Mexico, Dr.
Sperry said.
The Mexican organization of Ger
mans which is engaged In arousing
anti-American feeling is known as
the League of German Citizens,
Sperry told the committee.
(»ranches of the pan-Gennan league
founded in this country, he said,
CO,
Dr,
Dr.
Throe
were
and propaganda in their behalf was
carried on by Dr. Karl Peters.
Church societies have carried on the
work of "Kaiserism" in the United
States and both Catholic and Protes
tant clergymen have done much work
• in instilling German ideas in their
congregations, the witness said.
The following organizations were in
dicted by Dr. Sperry as being for the
purpose of carrying onSGerman prop
aganda In the United States :
The American Embargo conference,
the Friends of Peace, the American
Neutrality league, the American Inde
pendence union, the American Truth
society ad Labor's National
council.
Franz von Rintelen was a
lance" sent to the United Stales to
further this work. Dr. Sperry said.
He declared that von Rintelen came
here with more than $300,000 and the
"power to make direct bribes to con
More than $391,000 was
Peace
"free
gressmen."
spent by von Rintelen, lie said,
arouse labor against America's par
ticipation in the war and a large part
of this sum was spent through Jere
miah O'Leary, Dr. Sperry declared.
As indicative of the "German octo
pus" in this country there are
present 491 German schools in the
United States, Dr. Sperry said, .
to
the
CASUALTY LIST
TO BE GIVEN TO
PUBLIC, REPORT
REORGANIZATION TO BE
MADE FOR GREATER
EFFICIENCY
Men to be Shifted in
Many Places
Return of Secretary of War to
Mark Changes of Great Moment
in the Details of Departmental
Work.
WASHINGTON,. April 9—That the
casualty list of thé American overseas
forces will again be published follow
ing the return of Secretary of War
Baker from France was intimated to
day In sources close to the White
house.
The return of the secretary is ex
pected shortly and with his arrival
the president* it is expected, will per
sonally take up with him the matter
of resuming the lists.
It was also intimated that with the
secretary's return will come a reorgan
ization of the war department. The
president is known to be anxious to
have each man take up work to which
he Is especially fitted and a working
program for
Crowell, Stettinius and Kepple will be
outlined.
It is said that the president views
StettUiius as one of his "big men"
Assistant Secretaries
(Continued on Page 5)
SETTLE OUR TRADE BALANCE
WITT! SILVER SAYS ÎMTTÏAN
WASHINGTON. April 9.—The set
tlement of huge trade balances ad
verse to the United States by payment
In silver bullion Instead of gold was
proposed today In a bill Introduced
by Senator Pittman of Nevada.
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DAN McCOOK POST, G. A. R.
AMERICAN FLYER CARRIES TWELVE
FROM NEW YORK TO LONDON, REPORT
Much Excitement in Gotham Over Story of Re
markable Flight—Confirmation Lacking—Pres
ident Hawley of Aero Club Skeptical—Some
Believe Trip Confirms Certain Statements of
George Creel While Others Think Lloyd
George Had It in Mind in Recent Utterance.
NEW YORK, April 9.—Reports that an American Flier had
made a successful trip frtyn New York to'London with 12 pas
sengers today startled New York and caused a buzz of excite
ment and attempts to verify the feat.
In the Wall street district it was understood the original tip
regarding the performance came in a cable to a brokerage office.
No confirmation was obtainable and even the leaders in aerial
science professed to have no hint that such a test had been
contemplated.
By some it was hailed as the answer to Lloyd-George's state
ment that the Americans would soon give the Germans "the big
gest kind of a surprise." At Washington George Creel, who a
few days ago sait! an important announcement would be made
soort which would show' recent criticisms of the government's
aviation plans were groundless, promptly announced that he
had no such flight in mind in making his statement.
Alan R. Hawley, president of the Aero club, questioned the
report.
"While anything is possible these days, the report does not
sound plausible," he said. "If such a machine has been built
in this country the fact has been kept very quiet. Certainly
we have heard of the construction of no machine capable of
such a feat.
MUST BRING SUITS
NEAR RESIDENCE
WASHINGTON, April 9—Court ac
tion against railways under federal
control must be brought In the county
or district in which the plaintiff
sides or In which the cause of
action arises. Railway Director Mc
Adoo made this ruling today.
1 EUTONS RELAXING PRESSURE EAST I
OF AMIENS, BOMBARD PICARDY
Germans Gain Slightly at Extreme Loss East of
Noyon—Thought That They Contemplate Ef
fort to Assail Entente Forces Near Arras
Double Blow From Huns Thought Possible
Foch Baffles Foes—French Locate Long Dis
tance Gun and Shell Its Position.
i
(By Prank Charlton, I. N. 8. Cable Editor)
Relaxing their direct pressure against the allied positions cast
of Amiens, tlie Germans have continued to bombard along,the Picardy
battle front and in sectors north of the battle zone with the utmost
violence.
A concentrated fire is being directed along the British lines
between Lens and La Bassee canal. Further south, at the point of the
German wedge, the Germans have shelled the allied positions in the
sectors of Villers-Bretcnneux and Mericonrt 1'Abbe.
On the southern side of the salient, where the French are hold
ing the line, the Germans, at extreme losses to themselves, forced
the French to retire slightly in the sector of the Oise and Ailette
rivers, east of Noyon.
The battle has swung into another period -of stagnation so far
as the infantry fighting is concerned, but there is every indication j
that the Germans are preparing for another blow north of Arras, j
which will extend the battlefield to a length of more than 120 miles, !
It is not yet plain whether the Germans hope to begin an offen
sive with a view to trying to reach the coast of the English channel.
But it is becoming more and more evident that the Gernmns vyill try
tc widen their salient by striking from the northern and southern
sides so that the dangers of a great flank attack by the Anglo-French
armies will be averted.
However, by widening the northern end of their salient the Ger
mans would naturally extend their lines towards the coast and at the
same time would menace the British hold on Viniy ridge and Arras
and strengthen the German grip on Lens.
The Lens-La Bassee district has been made historic by the strug
gles that have taken place in it since the early days of the war. Lying
to the northwest and north of Lens are Hulluch and Hill No. 70 for
possession of which countless lives were given up on both sides.
Lens itself was the objective of a British offensive last year and
while they were able to get into the suburbs, the Britons were un
ai5iC to brealk the Germai) hold upon the place. Lens is known as
the gateway to the French coal fields in northern France and the al
lies had hoped to break through and wrest the mines from German
control. ,
There is a possibility that the Germans may deliver a double blow
in the next series of battles if Arras is their immediate objective.
South of Bueqnoy there is a minor salient jutting into the British
front ahtl the Germans might try to accomplish two results at one
stroke bya drive in that region. If successful they would straighten
their line and at the same time creep nearer to the Arras railway
menacing Arras on the southwest.
This was the twentieth day of the struggle and so far a decisive
decision is not yet in sight. General Foch's strategy has the Ger
mans completely baffled.
The exact location of the German long range gun that has been
shelling Paris has been discovered and it is being bombarded by
French artillery and French airmen, according to a report in circu
lation here today. The emplacement is at Crepy on the northeastern
edge of the forest of St. Gobain. Crepy is six miles northwest of
Laon and seventy miles northeast of the northern suburbs of Paris.
o I
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EVENING S. S. MEETINGS
BEGIN AT 8 OCLOCK
Because the daylight saving law
saves so much daylight in the
evening, the women of the city
who are Interested have asked
that they he allowed to use an
extra hour of it in (heir homes
before (hey attend (lie meetings
of the State Sunday school con
vention, which convenes in (his
ci(y tomorrow for a three day
session, so the hour for opening
the evening sessions has been
postponed from 7 o'clock until
8 o'clock. All other meetings
will be held at (he hour named
in the program. The program
was arranged liefere the new law
was passed.
5T°
Kahn Leader for
New Draft Law
_
WASHINGTON. April 9.—The ad
ministration again has called upon Ju
lius Kahn, Republcan, to lead the fight
for the enactment of draft legislation
in the house. Kahn led the fight for
the passage of the original selective
draft law a year ago, when Chairman
Dent of the house military affairs
committee declined to be the admin
istration spokesman. The new draft
quota bill, to which there Is powerful
opposition in the house, will come up
for consideration Thursday.
"The opponents of the bill are still
clinging to a belief In the volunteer
system," Kahn said. "They refuse to
see that the volunteer system has been
absolutely discredited by the success
of the selective draft. Offical figures
given me by the war department show
(hat not over 800 men a month are
volunteering, on an average, through
out the country. That means only
two men to a district, yet the men
will stand up and tell you of the in
re
the
Justice that will be worked upon their
districts under the new system, which
will not give credit for volunteers. I
have no patience with them."
PARIS, April 9.—A lull developed in
the infantry fighting on the French
section of the Picardy battle front
last, night, but the Germans continued
to bombard furiously.
The French war office announced
at noon that heavy artillery duels de
veloped on both sides along the front
north of Montdidier and from Mont
didier to Noyon.
In accordance with orders advanc
ed French troops on the southern
(Continued on Papre 10)
FORDNEY SCORES
FEDERAL FARM
LOAN MANAGERS
-
ranking republican of
j WAYS AND MEANS COM
MITTEE FLAYS BOARD
j
j
War! FnifL îr» fV»o
iNever nao r aim m me
j
i
|
, WASHINGTON. April 9.—The fed
| e rai farm loan board was bitterly at
i tacked by Representative Fordney,
j Michigan, ranking Republican on the
ways and means committee, today
j - a n organization squandering the
j people's money—money that Is being
raised by war taxes unprecedented."
System
Declares That Loans Are Not the
Best and Are Made Sometimes
Where Men Could Not Borrow
From Banks.
"I have never had any faith in the
success or wisdom of the system,"
said.
I -
"I am now more thoroughly
(Continued on page 10)
BRITISH HEAD
SAYS MOVES 1
ALL FORESEEN
CONCLUSIONS REACHED SEV
ERAL MONTHS AGO WORK
ED OUT
Combatant Strength of
Armies Equal
Refers to Report of Irish Conven
tion—New Bill Will Entail
Great Sacrifices Says the Brit
ish Prime Minister.
LONDON, April 9.
Premier Lloyd
George warned the British people to
day that the Germans are evidently
preparing another and a greater blow
in the mighty Picardy battle now rag
ing ^n France.
The warning came in an address in
the house of commons just before the
man power bill, raising the military
age limit was introduced.
At the same time the premier told
tile people that they must expect new
sacrifices as a result of the man pow
er proposals contained in the meas
ure.
"The Germans have greatly exag
gerated the number of prisoners and
guns they claim to have captured in
the battle," declared the speaker.
"We hold reserve guns and ammu
nition," he continued.
"The issue of the next battle might
very well be determined by the ac
tion of President Wilson in placing
American troops at the disposal of the
allies," said the prime minister. "It
is impossible to overestimate the of
fer," he said.
The position of the allies has been
stabilized, the speaker added.
The Germans have used 97 divis
ions so far in their attacks in the
great Picardy battle, Premier Lloyd
George told the house of commons.
(A German division consists of 12,000
bayonets and according to the pre
mier's figures, they have used 1,164,
000 men on the firing line since their
offensive was launched against Amiens
on March 21).
Continuing Mr. Lloyd George said
that the Germans had organized their
troops so that the greatest possible
number of divisions could be used in
the fighting.
The operations carried out by the
Germans in their first effort to drive
n wedge between the British and the
French armies and any advances that
the Teutons might make had been dis
counted in advance, the prime minis
ter said.
Sir
Henr> r Wilson's conclusions,
reached some months ago, regarding
an offensive, have been proven almost
in detail, the premier said.
"It had been regarded as possible
that the enemy might tye able to
break through liait the depth of the
front' attacked.''
(Sir Henry Wilson is chief of staff
of the British army.)
When the battle developed on the
Somme the total combatant strength
of the German army on the western
front was about equal to the total
strength of the entente allies, Mr.
Lloyd George went on.
Following his remarks regarding the
great world battle in France the pre
mier stated that the report of the Irish
home rule convention had ben laid
down on the table.
Going hack to the military situation
the premier said that the battle
Cambrai last fall was trivial when
compared with the Picardy struggle
and that, until the strain relaxed It
would he impossible to ascertain ex
actly what had happened.
"The commanders of all the allied
armies agreed unanimously to the se
lection of General Foch as generalis
simo," said the premier. He went on
to denv any possible assertion that
the allied forces had been dissipated
in subsidiary enterprises.
In this connection Mr. Lloyd-George
gave the location of various British
army units, saying that there are only
two British divisions at Salonika, one
division in Mesopotamia and three
other divisions in Egypt and Pales
tne.
nf
In describing the Picardy fighting
Mr. Lloyd-George said that Brigadier
General Carve had held the gap to
Amiens for six davs for with signal
men. engineers and laborers;
body, in fact, who could hold a rifle.
Censure of General Gough, command
ing the fifth army, had been withheld
the premier continued, but he had re
limuished his command.
The third army had not yet yielded
100 yards in the face of any attack,
he said.
"There are still
nny
reserve men la
Great Britain for the battle line la
the event of an emergency, without
impairing our striking power in the
least," continued the statesman.
Lloyd-George said that tha
Germans were calling
class producing 550.000 youths tha;
could be used In battle.
Mr.
up another

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