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The Camden chronicle. (Camden, Tenn.) 1890-current, October 06, 1899, Image 2

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THE CHRONICLE.
A DEJIOCUATIO HEWSPArr.il
rulllihoi Weekly at Cumdcn, Tcnn.
Enter! at Camden a Becond-Claas
Mail Mailer.
TR1TI8 DROR., rubllslicm,
Camden, Tcnn.
ryrirrrz' " ; tji 11 ... r
If you me onlliiiHinslio over the
automobile, you nro ntiloinud; if an
c.'itlnihi.'ist, an autoiiiHiiiHc; if you ow'j
or desire to own a motor c;u i iiu(, a
vbtim of Rutouiaiiirt. Those aro the
latest additions to tho Dullish lau-
France, bo B.tys Archbishop Ireland,
nud io say all careful observers of
cm rent events, sudors from an clo
merit of instability boctuso hIio retains
u largo portion of llio monarchical
system. Tho tiuio i not distant,
liowcver, when she will make radical
changes iu this re.'ipoct, hlougli off the
antique methods which hho has in
liniii'd, r.ul adopt the republican
principle w h:di have uiado what
no me. Yb m she does that, the
rumors of iuipoi ial intrigues with the
purpose ol re-establishing a throne
will ea-e.
Lady (ieorgina Vornon, daughter of
iho tenth Earl o Haddington, is well
known as an authority on dairying as
an occii aiiou for women. She spent
some time iu f'ocmandy studying into
French methods iu cheefto-inaking.
She rdrounly urgea the practicability
of dairying for woiuon a self-sup-porting
iudus'ry, but says that cheese
would be ihe most profitable branch
of tha work. Most of the bad butter,
rlu? claims, ome.s from small dairies
v ith only two or three cows. It i8 to
be hoped, remarks Harper's Bazar,
that many women of this country may
be induced to follow some of her sug
gestions, going into the manufacture
of some of the more del Urate iheese3.
During the Paris Exposition there
will be over a hundred congresses ol
all sortSjkind, tongues and conditions,
comprehending everything from a
bacillus to tho uuiver.se itself. There
will be a great hall, two-thirds on laud
and one-third on water, with vast
galleries and such arrangements that
thousands can bo meeting at ouce.
For instance, tho 7000 membdrs of
the Congress of Mediciue will be
divided into 23 sectious, and not only
will each be taken care of, bit the
members will all be entertained and
will have special opportunities for
visiting the Paris schools and hospi
tals. This illustrates the whole pro
position. It shows that Paris is doiug
everything to gei the world to visit
her, and that she will exhibit all her
varied interests to the millions that
attead her end-of-the-century show.
The attendance provisos to be enor
mous. Unexpected success has followed
tho opening in Philadelphia of a
children's branch of the rubiic library.
It is the first library of the kind in
the city, nud the children have availed
themselves eagorly of the opportuni
ties it offers. Although it has been in
existence only thrco months, there
are about 2,409 names registered on
its books as regular readers. "With
clean Lauds and a clem faci" is the
only rule of the place, besides that of
orderly silence. During the whole
time of its existence no child has had
to be seut out of the library for
misconduct. Even on raiuy days, when
the place is crowded, ord?r and
sileuea always prevail. The little folk
come in and are allowed to go straight
to the shelves in search of reading
matter. Each child is allowed to take
out two books at. a time, one of them
fiction and the other instructive. On
tho aveiRf'O, tne cluk! readers are
about 14 years old, and the boys out
nnmber tne girls Hourly tour to one.
History is the favorite literature for
tbe bore, while the triil revel in fic
tion, ft is said by tho library people,
to tbe credit of tha children and the
shame o' t heir el lorn, that the pro
portion of iatructiv b o!;s taken out
bv the little ouos is far in advance of
those prnsd by ol lor card holders,
Xep abreaat of these stirring timet
by eubacricing for your home paper,
The price, is little, and you cannot
afford to le without it.
D FARAD
EGREA
Ml
Admiral" Dewey Reviews a Great Host of
Patriots at New York.
FIFTY THOUSAND IN LINE
Event Unparalbkd and Wonder
of Modern Times.
Schley Divides Honors With the
Hero of Manila.
The land parade in New York Sat
urday in honor of Dewey capped the
climax. The city, state and cation
nnited in one vast demonstration wor
thy of the hero of Manila. Fifty
thousand men were in lino and tho air
was torn with the shouts of millions.
The naval parade of Friday was a mag
nificent and superb spectacle, bu. the
wopdor of modern times was the great
land parade which occurred Saturday.
Thousands of brave men of our
land and sea forces, militia of fifteen
states and the veterans of the civil
aud Spanish-American wars swelled
the procession and gave it the dignity
in size that it boasted in sentiment.
Walls of people, miles long, stretched
down the line of march on either side,
a dense, impregnable mass. Fifth
avenue from Fifty-ninth street to the
Washington arch at Fourth street,
where the paiade disbanded, was sol
idly packed with spectators, who over
flowed into tho buildings aud win
dows and on to the roof lines, sat in
embrasures and crowded scaffolding.
Along Broadway where it crossed
the avenue the skyscrapers were as
crowded at the top as at the bottom,
and for blocks down the intersecting
streets tenants hung from the win
dows and fire escapes, and multitudes
of them were on the roofs lying flat on
their stomachs peering down. For
honrs they waited patiently and good
naturedly to see Dewey, and when
they saw him they waited on uncon
sciously for three hours and a half
while the whole procession passed.
The first ceremony of the day was
the presentation from the city hall of
a gold loving cup to the admiral by
Mayor Van Wyck in behalf of the city
of New York.
Parade Beglm.
Seventeen aerial bombs from the
top of the Waldorf-Astoria heralded
tho approach to the reviewing stand
in Madison Square. Jackies of the
Olympia marching rank on rank at
tho head of the column, their appear
ance being the signal for great cheer
ing.
The commander was on foot, walk
ing in front of his men as army offi
cers do. A equad of sailors dragging
a rapid-fire six-pounder brought up
he rear of the Olympia battalion.
Then came the hero, the admiral,
and the officers of the Ueet. All were
in open barouches and at their head
was the man of the hour. Mayor Van
Wyck pat beside Admiral Dewey in
the carriage. The front seat was bank
ed with beautiful floral pieces.
The admiral was recognized on the
instant and the cheers and hurrahs
that had greeted the Olympia's men
seemed tame compared with the shout
they raised.
The gallant captains of the ships en
gaged in the destruction of Montejo's
fleet, except poor Gridley, who died a
mouth after tho battle, followed aud
also got a rousing welcome.
Tho three admirals, Howison, Samp
son and Philip, as they rode by with
their brilliantly accoutred staffs, were
easily recognized and got flattering
applause, as did many of the popular
officers of the north Atlantic squadron.
The governors of the several states,
who rode in carriages, though many
of them were popular and would have
received big demonstrations at any
other time, passed almost unnoticed.
The crowds would have none of them.
They yearned only for the brass but
tons and gold lace of military and na
val heroes and would have nothing
else. Both Major General Miles and
Major General Merritt got ovations.
But it was Bear Admiral Schley who
divided he honors with the central
figuro of the day.
ADMLKAL DEWEY INTERVIEWED.
Speaks of tlie Vltillppine Question Says
CHU Tries To Do Too Much.
In nn interview with Admiral Dewey
in theNflw York Evening Post, pmong
other things he uttya is tho following:
"I thought that this thing ia tho
Philippines would be over Jong before
this, as it should have been. Of
course there was the rainy season, and
I suppose little was done. Ono great
trouble has been that General Otis haa
h ied to do too much. I told him eo.
He wants to be general, governor,
j'-.da rikI everything else to havo
bold of ell tbe irons. No man can do
thij. This is the great trouble."
CLIMAX
He received a demonstration second
only to that of Dewey. People all
along tho lino fairly aroso at night of
him, shouting their already lacerated
throats to the breaking poiut.
"Hurrah for the hero of Santiago."
"There is the man that smashed
Cervera'a fleet."
"Hip, hip, hurrah for Schley," and
kindred cries came from all parts of
the line.
In upper Fifth avenue some enthsi
astic lady threw him a handful of
roses. They landed fairly in the car
riage. The admiral leaned forward,
picked them up and lifted them to his
lips. Instantly all tho ladies in the
balcony ecmed possessed with the
desire to have their flowers similarly
honored and he was fairly bombarded.
Many of the flowers fell into tho
street, only to be caught up by eager
spectators and carried to the carriage.
Before he got to Madison square, Ad
miral Schley as up to his arms in
flowers.
The marines and sailors of the north
Atlantio squadron, eight battalions of
them, attracted much attention.
Governor Boosevelt, riding n spir
ited black horse at tho head of the na
tional guard of New York and sur
rounded by brilliantly uniformed offi
cers, received a hearty ovation from
one end of the line to the other.
The national guard of all the states
made a brilliant showing and were
evidently proud of their appearance
and of the reception they received.
Before Madison Square was reached
Admiral Dewey and the receiving par
ty, in carriages, passed the front of
the procession and alighted at the re
viewing stand opposite Twenty-sixth
street, and took their places in the
boxes reserved for them. There for
tho first time the admiral saw the
great arch of victory erected in his
honor. Captain Coghlan and Captain
Wildes joined him a moment later, tho
crowds cheering like mad. Here the
admiral reviewed the entire parade.
Admiral Schley was very warmly
received at the reviewing 6tand. He
smiled constantly and bowed to right
and left. He and General Miles both
carried bouquets of flowers presented
by some enthusiasts on the line of
march.
The greatest applauso given to any
of the military organizations was ac
corded to the crack Tenth Pennsylva
nia regiment, which got back from the
the Philippines a short time ago. This
regiment marched in the regulation
khaki uniform which they wore during
thoir service before Manila. Tho
colors, torn to tatters, set the crowd
wild with enthusiasm.
Next to the reception to the Tenth
Pennsylvania was that to the Georgia
troops, who marched by with state
and national colors flying to the tune
of "Dixie." They were loudly cheer
ed. About 600 veterans of the civil war
were in tho parade and about 200 of
these were Grand Army men.
There were several thousands of
veteraus of the Spanish war. Most
of them wore their service clothes aud
were repeatedly cheered.
Tho unarmed section passed quickly
in review and the parade was over. It
had taken just three hours and twenty
eight minutes to pass. Tho first body
of the admiral's sailors passed him at
2:12 p. m. The last man in line went
by at 5 :4.0 p. m.
Hardly had the ambulances, which
brought up the rear, pulled under the
arch when squadron "A" galloped into
place for the admiral, ready to escort
lum to his hotel.
Saturday night a smoker given at
the Waldorf-Astoria to the sailors of
the Olympia concluded New York's
wonderful reception of Admiral Dewey
and his men.
Admiral Dewey was very tired at
the end of the parade. Ho was driven
at once to the residence of Manager
Boldt, of the Waldorf-Astoria, escorted
by squadron "A," and accompanied
by Mayor Van Wyck. He dined with
his lieutenants, Brumby aud Caldwell.
Admiral Dewey did not attend the
"smoker." He was feeling too fa
tigued to leave his apartments, and re
tired at 10:15 o'clock.
HOWISOX ON TIME.
Kanklng; Commander of Sampson's Squad
ron Keacho New York.
The United States cruiser Chicago,
flagship of Bear Admiral Howison,
reached New York Wednesday fiom a
long cruise, during which bdo touched
the coast of Africa and visited Port
Said. The cruiser proceeded imme
diately to the government anchorage
oST Tompkinsville, S. I., and took a
position astern of the old ship Lan
caster. A few moments later the blue
flag on Bear Admiral Sampson's ship,
the New York, was lowered and a red
flag substituted, iadicating tbat Samp
son was no longer ia command of lha
fleet.
BOERS ADVANCE
TO BOUNDARY
Kruger's Troops Prepare lo Attack
the British Lii
1 n Ai?
CLASH IS EXPECTED AT ONCE
Commander Joubcrt (lather a
Strong Army On the
Frontiers.
A London special pays: It is now
evident that Buffalo river, the north
eastern boundary of Natal, is to bo
the opening scene of the war. In
viow of its strategic value, Joshua
Joubert has taken personal command
of tho Boer forces there, establishing a
strong liue of pickets along the river
and has ordered the natives to drive in
all the stock.
All the available burghers in tho
neighborhood have been requisitioned.
with the result that some two thousand
have mobilized at Wakkcrstrom, the
chif point of mobilizatiou there.
From all points in the Transvaal,
Natal and Cape Colony came reports
of renewed military activity on tho
frontiers, and wbilo the movement of
individual command as yet do not show
concerted plans, it is evident that the
narrow, wedge-like strip of Natal,
whose apex is crowned with tho omin
ous name of Majuba Hill, will be the
center of the coming 6torm.
Late Saturday afternoon tho Boors
established a camp at Scheepers Nek,
near Vryheld, aud they will mobilize
a great force on the Buffalo river,
which the authorities at Dundee ex
pect will move across the border to
that point, probably at once.
It i3 is believed that a conflict at
this point will certainly occur within
a few days.
At the eame time the Boers aro col
lecting a force of 2,000 men under the
notorious commandant, Cronje, in the
Mnlmani gold fields, near Mafeking,
where Colonel Baden-Powell is sta
tioned. Dispatches from Tuli, Bhodesia, an
nounce that another force of burgh
ers is massed at Petersburg, fifty
miles south, and that outlying parties
are posted at all the drifts along the
Mimpopo river.
The Boers openly threaten to raid
Vryburg, in British Bechuanaland, as
soon as hostilities open, and The Kim
berly Advertiser complains
of
in
the
not
apathy of the Cape ministry
taking steps to present this.
AUUISALDO TURNED DOWS.
For Third Time Otln Herusea To Treat
With Kebel Leader.
A Manila special says: Agninaldo's
third attempt to shift hia difficulties
into the field of diplomacy is a repeti
tion of the other one or two, with an
impossible endeavor to obtain some
sort cf recognition of his so-called
government.
The Filipino envoys had an hour's
conference with General Otis Sunday
morning. They brought from Aguiu
aldo a message that he desired peace,
and wished to send a civilian govern
ment commission to discuss the ques
tion. General Otis replied that it was im
possible for him to recognize Aguinal
do's government in any wny.
A STORY OF IIOIUIOH.
Fifteen Passengers On An Emigrant Ship
FerUhed In Wreck.
A Montreal ppecial saya: Two hun
dred and lifty f-cantily clad, baggage
bereft men, women and children were
ou board of an intercolonial special
which steamed into Bonaventure Fri
day night. They comprised the
greater number of those who failed
from Liverpool on September 14th on
board the steamship Sootman bound
for Montreal, which was wrecked ou
tho shores of the Straits of Belle Isle,
on the morning of the 21st. It was
not only a tale of shipwreck that they
had to tell, but one of death, of suf
fering and pillage. Fifteen, at least,
of the Scotsman's passengers perished.
WELCOME AWAITS l.KUADY.
Georgians Frepnrlng Great Keception Foi
Dewey's Flxt; lieutenant.
Interest in the reception which will
be given to Flag Lieutenant Tom
Brumby, of the Olympia, by Georgia,
has been increased by tho arrival of
the hero in New York, and prepara
tions are going on to make the event
one of too greatest in the history of
Atlanta, where it will occur.
When Lioutenaut Brumby visits his
native f-tata he will bo received with
enthusiasm second only to that dis
played. in the metropolis at tho arrival
- I of his chief. Admiral
Dewev. All
Georgia will join in the
ctTort to give.
him a rouEiny reception..
"A Gentle Wind
of Western Birth"
Ti"s no t;v4tier s(jry (j mrru".'y thxn
the Announcement th.it tht hestlih-ch tr
And hidlth-bnnger, Ihe ft SdrsjfArl'A.
tt?.s cf the birth cf an era of good hes'th.
II is the out tiliiUt specific for the curt
cf alt Itood, slonmch And liver trou'Jss.
footle SaUaafdfn
Jokanaesbur? Modem City.
Tolinnnrnburir I n Ituxy, liuntlit', city
-the only tfnl city In South Africa
from tbo Hamlpolnt of n:i American.
The luilKHiiifu wouM lie o credit o any
city. The streets are wide, but tlio
motive powfr of tho street railways
tonslnt of horses and mules, anil m
the Boers ItpHove that the Miilistltutlon
of other power would stop the sale of
fbraj;o und hotR, ihe government will
not t'liint a concession. Of course nil
electric roud would open up now ter
ritory, Electrical lines should also bo
built in Klrabrrlcy, i;ast Loudon ntid
Durban. Tim horo oars still run In
these cities und tin? Icugth of the
presrnt roods N grrut.
Tr)ia;to Tvade Military Strvlcs.
In Huropo, all kinds of scheme are
adapted to outwit tin surgeons who ex
amino conscript ns to their availabil
ity for military service, and tho Hoent
gen rays huvo unmasked such frauds.
Some time ago a soldier In n inilllnry
hospital claimed to have been bitten
by a horse. A photograph of tho fin
ger was obtained and five needles were
discovered in it. The next day another
photograph was taken, and it was
found that tho soldier had removed one
of tho noodles. The soidier bad In
jured himself In order to obtain relief
from irksome military service.
What ! Trtterliie?
It 1s a sure euro for nil nkta dlneasfs. It
eni'ig Itch, inner, ringworm, ecgAinn, alt
rheum, et Never fnl!a Nothing U "Jimt n
good." Don't Accent nulmtltutt-s. Try. und
you will beconnnred. ns UioupiiikIs of othor
fcave II your drngjUt dopgn't keep It, Bund
Km. Iu BtampK dlrert to the maker. J. T. Sliup
trlne, SavaiiDuh, (in., for a Ikx postpaid.
I.rtja poiFessiorn bring irrpat care, and
these too often silence foug of praise.
To Cure Constipation Forever.
Take Cns--eret Candy Cathartic. 10g or 25n.
Jl V. C. C. foil to cure, drvgglstsrefuud money.
An Ithaca doctor brouiht In a bill to a pa
tient for 8!i',00 for ten visits.
How's This T
We offer Oue Hundred Dollars Reward for
piny rose of Catarrh that nunot le cured by
Halt's Ca'.arih Cure.
Y. J. i.'bsnet & O , Toledo, O.
We, the undersigned, have known V. J. Che
ney forthsle'A IS years, and believe Mm per
fectly honorable In all business transactions
and financially able to carry out any obliga
tion made by th-lr Ann.
Wept & liuu, Wholeeule Druggists, Toledo,
Ohio.
Wii.niso, KiywiM A Marvin, Wholesale
Druggists, Toledo, Ohio.
Hall's Catarrh Cure Is taken Internally, act
ing directly upon the hlood and nwous sur
faces of the system. Testimonials sent tree.
Price, 75e. per bottle. Sold by all Druggists.
Hall's Family Kills are the best.
Ad vice is rt'ldom welcome, anil thoo who
want It the mo-t always like it the least.
No-To-Iiac lor Tlfty Cents.
Guaranteed tfTaccc liabtt cure, mates weak
nirn stjeng, Mood pure. .'Cc, $1. All druce'i.
People should not Jndi;e others until they
thempelvos are tree from being Judged.
'IliRTo been ln? CASCAItETS for
Insomnia, with which I havo been afflicted for
over twenty years, and I can say that Cascarcta
have lven me more relief than any other reme
dy I have ever tried. I aliu.ll certainly recom
mend them to my friends as beina all tbev ura
represented." Tfloa Gillard, EigtD, 111.
CANDY
CATHARTIC
TftAOt MAftH BEeiSTtRED
Pleasant. Fiilaroble. Puient. Taste Good. Do
Ocad, .over SioKeo, Weaken, or Gripe. 10c. J5c, SOc.
... CURE COrJSTSPATiOH. ...
Stri:m Iti-iufdy foanT, I'Mltctro, Jlontrfal, JS.w '. 518
."iWV.'. Kiststo ; i; K K Tobacco Habit
7
oosins a
Is a serious problem. "If you put your
foot In It," you'll know better nest time.
But when you encase your feet In
Red Seal Shoes,
You get a solo full of satisfaction that
reflects comfort, economy aud good
jcidsment.
S0L! EVERY WHERE.
J.K. OTVRSHOEeO.,
ATLANTA, GA.
QEED WliEATiMLL
w HVe a;ain ofTcr tho cluaxot seed wheat on
the runrkot, and from probably tbe largwt
crop yield In the titute, If not tbe United
States. We had 355acr'.8 in wheat this year,
and the crop avetaed 29 bushels ier acre.
Where we had a good stand, Dot wiuler kil
led, we bad over 40 lusliela rer aera. One.
hundred bushels of uur wheat will contaia
low cockle teed than oue bushel of ordinary
seed wheat. lTice 1.15 f ur tr.sbel on cars
at Charlotte, las hold two hush el aid
are new no charge for I as. Terms: Casli
with order.
CHARLOTTE OIL & FERTILIZER GO,
Fer VP. to ULIY f.tl. Pre'l.
CHAIiLOTIi: "
r

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