OCR Interpretation


The Camden chronicle. (Camden, Tenn.) 1890-current, March 27, 1903, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of Tennessee

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89058013/1903-03-27/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

i
V1
1
2
r
Tile Ancient Kuins of
, friknkc.
l "T5 "57 "Vt r f : rJ -?T: - 7 ;
TUWELEll who recently
visited the famous ruins t
NX 1 'alfliko. Mate (if ( hl.ilias.
A
f .Of. Mill, I.IHICI1H I III' .1.1 IIUl'X
. which time nii'l tlit elements itiv grad
( iinlly 1 -i !i : : j In (In lr appearance and
li i! Ill i 1 !, ,l. Y.Cti'll ' l:it i i.vni' 1 .. il .ix.
i . . i . . ,... . -i. .t
by the Ftdernl loverniucnt to preserve
these i;:iprcs-ivo monuments of the
highly cultured race who constructed
Ihein, anil -f whose history and origin
but little Is known. The climate of the
region in whleh the ruins are situated
the direct osiposito of that of Egypt,
lasnnieh us the rainfall at Pnlonko
l.?s been known to amount, to 200
Inches a year. The- air Is humid and
encourages decay, and at the same
time stimulates the rapid growth of
Ihe vines and creeping,' plants, which
-1;
1
.'
CABVlNiJ FKO.M THE EUlN OF TALENSS
arc disintegrating the walls and pave
ments, and will eventually level them
to the ground. So dense Is the foliage
surrounding the ruins that light from
the sun is almost totally obscured. The
photographer who was employed hy
the Mexican Covornment to take pic
tures of the.' juins could accomplish
his objtct in some instances only by
means of a Hash light. The ruins of
ralenko are about 200 miles from the
port of Frontora, and are reached by
steamer up the Tabasco River to San
Juan P.autista aud thence by trail.
The group all lie within n radius of
2000 feet, and consist of nine distinct
structures, of which the "palace" is
the largest find most central. The
ruined buildings consist of temples,
pyramids, aqueducts and edifices
whose purpose is not yet ascertained.
The temple is the largest of all, and
pon it the ancient builders lavished
ill their art. It Includes a court and
balconies, as well as great corridors in
which tablets in bass-relief are fast
ened into the walls. Sculptures repre
senting battle scenes and events of the
V
if y
7
9
4&V&,zX&4 .......At,
I i ) i- 1
rr J
vf
'5 i rN
i
t. rrf V. . .-
S '
'fx,
i
f t
ft-' v
I
4 i J.
jiation's life are carefully depicted.
From them the physical characteristics
and domestic habits' may be correctly
ascertained. The dimensions of the
"palace" are great. J'aj"-ngth is 233
fei f. and breadth 1M feet, and I 1
evattd on a mound .' 1 1 o feet h'lii;.
fci t wide and forty fet't high. The ma
terial iixid Mils stone, many blin ks of
pitidkluiis -i;',c being used, ami all
julnid together with mortar. Am great
an lilt 't tiiiiil ability wax displayed by
Hie builder of the cdili'.es at Pah nke
n-t was kIhSvii by the architects who
erected those of the Nile. IIov it was
possible for a primitive people to fash
ion, convey and sculpture such im
mense litoiit s as were employed Is the
wonder of nioiTern nrclnicolo'.'l.-ts. it
would seem that the same people were
the builders of these structures found
at Mllta, Mayapan, Tula, as well as at
Palcnke, a race which covered Yucatan
and Ihe Southern States of Mexico
with .nighty tunplcs.
A French scientist with a lively Im
agination and unusual powers of ob
servation credits the "Toltecs" with
building thee ancient temples, and
llxts the seventh century as the period
of their erection, but these confident
assertions are doubted. Others place
the era In which th y were built as
early as the date of the pyramids of
Fgypt. However, it seems to be proved
beyond n doubt that many centuries
bcfoiv the discovery of America thes?
ruir.s were In existence. It Is not be
lievtd that Cortez or those with him
knew of the Fa!(rl;e ruins, though
that conqueror must have hem close
to them at one time. Europeans first
heard of them In l"r0, but it was not
until 17S7 that they were explored.
The kev unlocking the mysteries hid
den in the hieroglyphics which are
carved on hundreds of tablets may
some time be discovered, and the his
tory of a great race of people and their
origin be known, but their successors
who now inhabit the region have no
'.radltlons that can aid the inquirer.
The ruins of Falenke should be pre
served, and the Mexican (lovernment
owe that much to the world. If It were
possible to clear the timber away and
destroy the growth of vines which is
rapidly overwhelming them, these in
teresting relics might bo saved for the
future. They have so far resisted the
effects of time and physical convulsion,
but must eventually succumb to the
ceaseh ss, persistent and silent assault?
of an overwhelming tropical growth.--Scientific
A merie.m.
Tlie Hewitt I.mnp in Knzland.
The remarkable mercury vapor lamps
devised by Mr. Peter Cooper Hewitt
are now being exhibited at the offices
of the Westinghouse Company. These
lamps can be run off any ordinary continuous-current
electric light supply
system, and show an ciliciency of two
to three candks per watt, or for the
same lighting require only about one
ninth the current taken by ordinary
glow lamps. The sole drawback to the
light lies in its extraordinary color.
There Is a total absence of all red rays,
and consequently all tints red by ordi
nary light are curiously perverted. A
lady's lip? look purple; so that at pres
ent no attempt is being made to utilize
the light for domestic purposes, as
feminine opposition would be too
strong. In other cases, however, the
llpht has very strong advantages. It
is stated that It is an excellent light to
work by, and this Ave can well believe.
London Engineering.
4
V v r
u
ir iyvti. I
" ','1 "
f 1 f w
I
1
tt
' -1 :
V
TUP: RUINED TEMPLE OF PALENKE.
The yuckin, or moon guitar, of China,
has four strings, turned in pairs, at in
tervals of the lift li. The drum Is usu
ally decorated with Chinese figures in
various gvotc-iue pu.siti;jns.
Oldest Man in
the World
157 and Ilclhn Documents
; to Prove It.
rndoubtedly the oldest man In tie'
world, and probably the oldest human
being, Is Manuel del Valle, of Menlc
MANUKL )KL
Park, Cal. lit
of 157 years,
lie has legal
nas reached the agt
proof of his
age. In
many cases (if persons living beyomi
the hundred mark who have attracted
public attfiitlon there has been grave
doubt as to the year of their birth.
Relief in their age is based upon the;!
own stories or on hearsay.
Manuel del Yalle's proof is docu
mentary. He has in his possession the
certificate of his birth, signed by the
jefe politico, or chief magistrate of
Zacatecas, . Mexico. The certificate,
which shows that del Valle was born
in Zacatecas on November 121, '1743, is
supplemented by the records of the
Mexican customs service, in which he
served for many years.
Were it not for these indisputable
proofs it would scarce be believable
that a human being could have reached
the age of 137.
At the time
Del Valle was
born
1. i
S v. ,
1 if
1 -r. ,
' y '
- rf " i
', . ! '
't' i . 1.-.' , ,. f
yt.4
VV f I
1
I
George Washington was only thirteen
yiars eld. This living man was teN
years old when the French and Indian
Avar began.
He Avas a grown man of twenty
)? - i . ;if ,' - i it t:. . J v i- . ,;
..' . f i , :-. - ,
7 . .
h l s'V
f ' , : ' i !
: , ( : y : . : , , $ -. .. " ' ... -i ..,v't , . . : . r- . i.
J ' K Vl , "
' 7 if. t i j " v -
1 ' il '
c') -m I .-. k'U ' ' . ., ' ..:.'; .' .'.:,( ?''. . '.
I . : i ; v : -v, f. , , 'f
("'t : m t " '
"i ' - , j' ' v!
.1 --.v a . ' t ,. r ? . . . . . .-. . - v.. ' - '. "i
' ' j ' 1 11 ' i ' J ' '
' i y;. s ' . . ' '
. v . . " ; -
y 3 r", ' 4; V-
V ij;- ) " V , , .if
' J -;V-'';!"' - ' - -
battle of r.unl.er 1 1 111 wa.
fought.
lie was already ;,n old man wle-i
Napoleon was d. fcited at Wateiloo,
le lng then sixty five years old.
Iel Valle was 1u yiais old m( I'.i
be'.'innlng of t!i Mexican war.
He rct.icil l;o ;i aitle 1 us n. , nh.e
1 1 i n yt;i!s before that, having th; .1
rein hl the ;!.:e of i
He vas twenty ye
ihty-ckht.
i s ii i tistnms o!!l-
ehil at F.nset'.ada, Lower Califoi
VALLE, A(!K1) 157.
From 1S1 4 to 18 13 he acted as super
numerary in the Franciscan mission at
San Quentin, Lower California, the
first mission building to be established
on tlie I'acifie coast, and which is now
in ruins.
In 1813, when he was just 100 y?ars
old, Del Valk1 came with relatives to
what is now San Francisco in a vessel
that sailed around Cape Horn. !!.
has lived in Memo Park s:nee then
and has occupied the same room, his
great-grandnephew, Jose del Valle,
looking after the truck farm that sup
ports the family.
Manuel del Valle looks his great ?"ge.
He is a little, dricd-up, frail man,
scarcely ve fret tall r.r.d weighing not
more than ninety pounds. He is still
able to tyalk without assistance and
takes ft daily stroll about his house.
He has not been more than two blocks
away from it in thirty years. He can
see but little, but he hears fairly well.
He speaks English brokenly, but un
derstands it well, lie never was much
interested in the big events of the
world. lie says he has never used
liquor r.or tobacco. Furthermore he
declares that he never has wet his feet
nor been out in a frost, apparently
holding these things to be equally
abominable. He never eats solid food,
his only nour'''hrient being bean broth,
and all day 1. ..Jr he sits in the sunshine
in front of his adobe home. New York
World.
Sinnrt l'oz Snv Tioublo. .
The following Incident occurred
while the writer was a student in the
Philadelphia Normal School. The
teacher of drawing there was extreme
ly anxious that the girls should do
imaginative work.
She requested them to make a draw-
lug to illustrate a story in which a d
og
and a tree were the principal faetors.
One bright young lady linislietl her
Avork aud then sat verv comnla
tly
1 1..
waiting for her criticism, l'r esc:
Miss Campbell appeared, and as :o
looked liprn a beau'iiUd
drawing, of a tire s;;
good, but Avheie is the d
S'.lCtl
-'IT
'1 'he
":li.
dog:"
; 1'dy
"i'h.hi
('og." :'( binned i:.'- y
h (';; behind the trci
Eed'.rer.
It 1
'V' j il of I'l"
ilfiit Arthur
m
... , ;S1.-
I -'
.f-.'.V!
. ' ..'..V
i'l V;
'.'; ';-y
: '-? v ''
'r' .
in.' monument at the grave of dul
ler A. Arthur. In Itural Cemetery, Al
bany. New York, is Lt the form of
nngel 'placing a palm leaf on a sarco
phagus, lt ii a be;'.-.:'.ir'i:l piece of
sculpt 11; e. At th" base : here appear.
c:.'.y
th:
.uii::
u hi n tin
v , t
3 Farm Topics jj
i)i:ri:cT.s and soundness.
Th? line of l!stlii('tli between
rour.tIr:e..s ai;d ser leealde s K'.ndi.cs
M':u m!ii whtther the nlhnei.t u a
blenibh or (!ue to the kind of worl;
the horse ha: had to do. a horse can
be u"tl on a farm with n blemish
even unsoundness which would rei:dt
It uyelc-s as a driver, and w !.!; t In
l.orse xvou'.d be st I'vieeiibly sound ;
the farmer, It would not, In the latter
case, bo sound nt all.
When n horse has one hip lower than
the other it Is not always an unsound
ness, v.i In many cases It does r.ot In
terfere with h!s usefulness. Interfer
ing Is not nn unsoundm ss, but a defect
lu tin; gait, '('ribbing" Is sometimes
given in the Fngllsh bcr.cli as an un
soumlness, but the Aiueri'an very
often attributes it to Imitation of a
bad habit In another hoi'.-c L'r. F.
lorrcnce, In The Cultivator.
IXCURATOr.S A NECESSITY.
Years ago Incubators were cmei.
rretl princljially in the light of luxur!;-?,
to be possessed only by poulirymen of
unlimited means, but a new era has
dawned, one of necessity, not niono
for thce who raise large Cocks, but
for those also who raise only a ts'
hundred chicks. Incubators are no
longer experiments, successful only In
rare cases, but their construction nn 1
working arrangements aie so simple
that they art! always a decided sue
tCF.'. The cost has been lowered to
within the reach of everyone, and since
they require so little time and atten
tion, every person who raises as many
cs "00 chicks should own one.
Keep the hens laying and let the In
cubator do the hatching. It Is much
easier to raise the chicks in brooders,
and the loss from disease and acci
dents will be ir.uch less. Try one this'
season and rc if your profits are not
larger. He::: 2 and Farm.
DAI?A JOTTINGS.
The natural temperature of ir.ilk is
about 100 degrees or little more. The
calf should be fed milk about tills tem
perature, and cold or sour mil's never
fed.
Place small lumps of rock salt in the
pails from which cows are fed.
Milk from a newly calved cow
should not bo sent to the factory until
after seven milkings.
If rape and lucerne be allowed to
wilt in the s' 1 for some hours after
being Avet and fed to cattle Immediate
ly after being milted, the taint in the
milk will bj very slight and will disap
pear entirely after cooling, and good,
sweet butter can be made from it.
Milk should be treated in the same
way when wild mustard or wild carrot
is abundant in the hay. '
Ensilage which has become consider
ably spoiled and smells very strong
should never be near coavs when they
are being milked, or while the milk is
close to a manger, as the smell is so
strong from such ensilage that milk
will absorb it from the outside.
If a cow has a sore teat that will he
Injured by the hands in milking, do not
wet it with milk, but use a little vase
line. ....
FOR OUTDOOR FEEDING.
At a season of the year when, it is
desirable to feed most of the stock in
the pasture a number of troughs made
like that shown in the illustration will
be found to save considerable labor.
The trough may be made any size to
accommodate the animals to be fed.
Tr.oran foe ri'sxc:::
For horses and cows it may bo ar
ranged 011 the font h as shown and for
-heep and swine fastened lower uoavu
on ihe fence. Made a foot Avide at the
bottom, aud. say, twenty inches at the
top, it Avill be about right.
The trough should be securely spiked
to the fence posts as shown, and it'
tAvo animals are to be fed at a time
it may be divided in the middle. If the
animals are tied to the rims at the
posts each Avill get its share. Troughs
of this kind are especially desirably
when corn, oats or chopped roots ai
to be fed in the field and by their use
less or AA-asto of the food is p;v euted.
Indianapolis News.
1
T'" " ""61 j ' """ ' ' --T"--ai ""
4 -ii:-fX'-.-r-'''
.r---a ;,;t "'
An Attruipt Which FaUetl.
The IV.tngueso attempted to estab
lish cattle farming in Newfoiiadlan I
in 1333, but all iraeo of the cairn.: Is
they imported have been lost.
More then 321,000 acres of lard in
the Indian possessions of Great Uritaln
are devoted to the cultivation of lea,
nine-tenths of the area being in Assv.ni
and I'.engal. Production is o'nvkilijr
estimated r.t ll'l;,-yyj pj'aJs.

xml | txt