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The comet. (Johnson City, Tenn.) 1884-1916, January 13, 1916, Image 1

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JOHNSON CITY, TENNESSEE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1916.
Whole Number 1645
Thirty-Second Year.
ANTI-CflPITAL
PUNISHMENT
MEASURE PASSED BY TENNESSEE
LEGISLATURE IS VALID
STATUTE.
. RYE HELD BILL Til
LONE BEFORE
MAYOR CRUMP OUT OF OFFICE
UNTIL CASE IS DECIDED
NASHVILLE, TENN., Jan. 8. The
supreme court, speaking through Jus
tice Buchanan, this morning handed
down a unanimous opinion which in
effect means that the Bowers anti
rapital punishment law, enacted by
the last legislature and later vetoed
by Gov. Rye is a valid statute of the
state ot Tennessee. Gov. Kye held
the bill on his desk for more than
five days before he vetoed it, accord
ing to the point of law decided today.
The case decided, which also con
trols the Bowers bill matter, was
that of the city of Johnson City vs.
the Tennessee Eastern Electric Co.,
in which the constitutionality of
house bill No. 10, passed about the
same time and vetoed under the
Isame circumstances as the Bowers
.bill, was involved.
House bill No. 19 authorizes the
state to pay for lighting the East
Tennessee normal school.
The supreme court held that a re
cess of the legislature is not an ad
journment, and that Gov. Rye should
kouo fUoA his vatn mpRRflfire with the
clerk of the body in which the bill
originated or the chairman of the
committee on enrolled bills during the
recess.
The court this morning also speak
ing through Justice Buchanan re
taoA tn vfipntA Its order bv which
former Mayor Crump and Commis
sioner Utley of Memphis were en
Joined from taking their seats as of
,.ioio r.r Mamnhin for the new term
to which they were elected last April
nnA which beean January 1. The
r-t was divided. Chief Justice
Neil and Judge Williams holding with
Judge Buchanan and Justice Fancher
and Green dissenting.
Tha onininn of the majority in the
case was that all matters growing
out of the Memphis ouster contro-voi-av
chnulH he nreserved in statu
quo until the court should pass upon
it at final hearing. It was held that
the court had appellate Jurisdiction
in the matter.
Under the opinion Crump and Utley
will not be allowed to assume omce.
in statins orally
the dissent of himself and Judge
nraan indicated that they did not
ikinb tV,o mialsr nrnpaariine'S should
VI11MIV V " f - o- -
ri in thft new term of Crump and
- - - -
TTtlev were suspended
from office- November 3 last on their
"legal admission" of. charges made
in ouster proceedings, based chiefly
on the alleged non-enforcement of the
;state-wide prohibition law.
m iv Trt AIWKRTIKR
THE SOUTHERN STATES
MaahviUe. Tenn.. Jan. 10. Plans
for an aggressive campaign to raise
half a million dollars to advertise
.anthem states, were adopted
today at a meeting here of the exec
utive committee of the industrial bu
reau of the south. President F. W.
nt Nashville: E. E. Britton,
of Raleigh, N. C: David Chapman of
Knoxville; Paul Kreusl of Chattanoo
o nnH nr. Pop of Raleigh. N. C.
It Is thought that a meeting will be
arranged for January zz, at L,naa
nooga, of all interested in tne pian
KVtli DISLOCATED WHEN
HE JUMPED OUT OF BED
Fridi.y morning in Jumping out of
bed, one of the balls flew out of
socket, dislocating the neck of Stan
ley Rambo.
. Dr. Massey was summoned and in
titter desregard of the speed limit
Arrived at the Rambo home in a few
minutes and thinks he got the ball
haMr in nlnre and that Stanley will
e all right in a few days. Sevier
vllle Vindicator.
nfflTH SKWTENCE OF
HENRY ROBERTS
. Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 8. Gov. Rye
today commuted to me imprison-
nf Ifenrv Roberts
a Fayette county boy, sentenced to
be electrocuted ior imumi.
was taken following the decision ot
- uniirt a it result of
which the anti-capital punishment
bill is tne law in imnwscr.
i.n nvTr.'a Pl?fK-TAB-HONEY
For your cold, for your cough, for
your feverish turoat, nose ana uru
' r Tiail' Pine-Tar-Honey. Ho
HBO S " -
"ney soothes the Irritation, Pine-Tar
cuts the phlegm, thus relieving con-
iKn Tar alan arts as an an
tiseptic, as a result general relief
follows. Breaming, Deep rw-
nd further Inflammation is arresieu
Insist on Dr. Ben s rmriar nwiry
It is an ideal treatment rru-e oc
ttr I T dwla nna. of our VOlinff le
gal lights, has returned from a visit
ORGAN ZED
BY TWENTY OF THE YOUNGER
MEN OF JOHNSON CITY
WHO WILL
IVE THEIH F1HST CON
cm II TIE
MONDAY EVENING, JANUARY
TWENTY-FOURTH
A few davs asro twenty of the
younger men of the city met and or
ganized themselves with the idea of
promoting a much needed brass band
for Johnson City. A greater number
of the organization have had some
little experience in band work and
much enthusiasm was manifested, at
tended with the raising of $200.00 by
he members of the organization.
The people of Johnson City as a
whole are thoroughly in accord with
ha movement to eive to the citv a
.irst class band and the citizens and
business men who have been ap
proached thus far have given loyal
jupport to the undertaking. The
lohnson Citv Band will be an incor
porated institution thereby insuring
Ihe city a good musical organization
jf its kind for many years. On Mon
day evening, January 24th, the band
eive a concert in connection
with feature Dictures at the Majestic
Theatre and every one who is inter
ested in the success of a good brass
band for the city is cordially mviten
to attend the concert. Twenty years
ago, when Johnson City was about
i-he r7p of Bluff Citv. we had a band
that was a credit to the town. Why
have we lately had to go tto Bluff
City and other places to secure tne
services of a band when the material
at hand was more than sufficient to
have an organization that would re
flect credit on Johnson city at me
present time.
WINTER TERM OF
STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
The winter term at the East Ten
nessee State Normal scnooi nas
opened with a large increase in en-
rnlimant. Almost without exception
ail the students who were in attend
ance during the fall term returned.
Among the many new students wno
nave registered are the following:
inrlH Aouff. Knox county: Jesse
Andes, Washington county; Dave L.
Blake, Morgan county; Horace .
Blankenshlp, Unicoi county; Mollie
L. Boyd, Carter county; Georgia A.
Boyer, Hawkins county; Alfred E.
Brown, Bledsoe county; Besse a.
Rrnwn Washington ' county: James
E. Brown, Bledsoe county; Clyde S.
Bruan. Cocke county; Cornelius u.
Cabage. Grainger county; Rosa M.
rhPKtnutt. Hawkins county: tieuia n.
Christenberry, Roane county; Emma
Cooper, McMinn county; Laura a.
Curtis, Monroe county, Charles B. F.
Davis, Union county; Estella Easter
ly, Greene county; Eula V. Easterly.
Greene county; Ethel M. jawaras.
Claiborne county; David C. Ellis, Car
ter county; Fay Eskew, Knox coun
ty; Stella Fanning, Greene county;
Ira Pearl Ford, Washington county,
RUsha N. Fortner. Claiborne county;
Luna O. Gass, Meigs county; Mildred
r.iihreath. Washington county; Mae
Hale, Cock county; Rutn L,. naie,
Cocke county; Flossie M. Hall, Mc
Minn county; Delia Mae Hartsell,
Cocke county: Dicie J. Hartsell,
noeke eountv: Mollie M. Hicks, Sul
livan county; Myrtle D. Hinkie, jonn-
son county: Bonnie Robert Howard
Johnson county; Bryan M. Hyaer,
Carter county; Ralph Hyder, Carter
county; Thomas J. Hyder, Carter
county; Wm. S. Ivy, Hamblen coun
ty; Alonzo W. Johnson, Carter conn
tv vini-p-nipt A. .Tones. Cocke coun:
ty; Arch M. Kincaid, Meigs county;
Bryan King, Hawkins county; no
va J. Kirk patrick, Hawkins county;
mhart. Claihorne county:
Clarence U Lavender, Rhea county;
rinniel m. Tjiws. Johnson county;
uez Lowry, Monroe county; Roscod
McAndrews. Jefferson county; ueo.
C. McKenzit, Meigs county; Thasia
. Mayes, Hawkins county; Glynden
. Herrick, Loudon county; Virgil D.
illigan, Hamblen county; Geneva A.
Moore, Washington county; Juanita
Moulton. Washington county; Carrie
T. Murphy, Hamilton county; James
II. Nuchols. Blount county; Wm. Os
car Oaks, Carter, county; Edgar H
Ogle, Blount county; Minnie Ousley,
Union county; Samuel C. ratton,
Rhea county; Luella Payne, Roane
county; Essie Pennington, Monroe
county: Anna Laura Powell, Meigs
Ainn E. Rav. Jefferson
county, Hancil W. Ring, Washington
county; Carl Sams, unicoi county;
Fanny B. Scott, Hamblen county; ue
lila Stzer. Sullivan county; Ida G. Si'
ter. Sullivan county; Ira T. Sliger.
McMinn county; Flora E. Strock,
Hamilton county; Beulah L. Tarver,
Knox county; Nola M. Taylor, An
derson county; Wm. Claude Terry,
Scott county; David E. Thurman,
Hawkins countv: Lou Venie Wagner,
Johnson county; Nora B. Wagner,
Tnhnann countv: Timmie. A. Walker,
Hawkins county; Eloise Williams,
unrnn oonntv! John J. Yates, Grain
r rnnntv. and Silas York, Scott
" '
county. v
S
WILL BE PLEASED WITH THE I
BILL REPORTED TO THE
- HOUSE.
BILL ALSO PROVIDES
FOR fjEPJUR Vi
SUM OF $7IMS,000 ( OULD BE USED
ANNUALLY IN TENNESSEE.
WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan. 9.--Ad-vorates
of good roads over Tennes
see will he deeply -interested in the
bill that has been reported to tne
house of congress by the committee
on roads as a measure that all par-
ties have harmonized upon as on.
that can be passed. Under this bill
tho irnvprnmpnt will sDend in each
state a sum equal to that by the
state to a certain limit that is based
upon the apportionment as to com
bined mileage of rural and star
routes and population. Under the
bill the sum that could be spent ev
ery year in Tennessee would be
$706.00(1. This is because Tennessee
has 2.H!) per cent of the total popu
lation of the United States, estimated
nt nna hnnrii-ed million people: and
3.26 per cent of the total of the star
and rural routes in tne Lniteo
States.
frn u-rouumnn Sam R. Sells. Of the
first district of Tennessee, is ranking
republican on the roads committee
and is nleased with the action of the
committee, especially since features
of his good roads bill have been writ
ten into the agreed measure.
Congressman Sells secured tne
adoption of an amendment to this
bill eliminating that feature ot tne
Dronosed bill which provided tor a
distribution of one-third the total
on tha basis of area, and which
amendment will give to Tennessee
approximately $150,000 additional.
Sells Discusses Hill.
Speaking of the bill, he said:
it io nnt wVint all of us wanted,
but it at least provides a beginning.
Even with the comparatively small
appropriation which it makes, it
ought to prove a wonderful incent
ive to road building. But pernaps
the greatest benefit will be derived
from its provisions for assisting in
road maintenance. It provides a
fund out of which the average coun
ty in Tennessee may receive from
$6,000 to $7,000 annually to e ex
pended in the upkeep of its roads.
Perhaps one-half of the counties in
East Tennessee have built, or are
building a thorough system of pike
rn.ii n far I know, no ade
quate provision has been made for
their maintenance, with the result
that in a few years the work win
have deteriorated for want of an in
telligent system of repair. This bill
will provide a large part of the sum
necessary to keep these roads in
first-class condition, and ought to
prove a great stimulus to road build
ing. Tennessee badly needs addi
tional road legislation in order to
the federal aid to which she
is entitled under this bill, an act
ought to be passed providing for
closer co-operation between tne
counties and the state. And then,
too, we ought to abolish our convict
lease system and employ this laoor
in building roads. Tennessee receives
about forty cents each day for con
victs leased to private firms and cor'
porations. She pays from $1.25 to
$1.50 per day for free labor on her
roads.
"A concerted movement ought to
begin in all sections of Tennessee
innkiner to the enactment of laws by
the, next legislature for the better
ment of our road system, no more
Important matter will be presented
for its consideration, and I hope that
both political parties will take such
action in their next state convention
as will commit both parties to an
Improved program, and render it an
absolutely non-partisan measure."
PRESIDENT MAY SPEAK
ON PREPAREDNESS
woshtnvtnn Tan 10. President
Wilson nossiblv may put the ques
tion of national defense before the
country in a series of speeches as
one means of getting the necessary
legislation through congress.
The President today received sev
eral invitations to speak at banquets
or meetings here, at Baltimore and
New York within the next month.
Officials intimated that the President
might take advantage of the invita
tions to lay the administration plan
for national defense directly before
the people. As soon as the subma-
ine controversy is entirely cleared
Mant Intanria in Hfwnte
UJJ b LA A V.UVV. iiiivuho
his whole attention to getting the na
tional defense tnrougn congress.
JANUARY STOCK SALE IN
MORRISTOWN BIGGEST YET
Morristown, Jan. 8. The January
sale of horses '" and mules on the lo
cal market this week reached the
highest mark on record
gllCBv Illallk till irtuiu. -
The DUytng was DrlSK anu me
prices good. Mules averaging $175
and horses $150 per head.
Twelve carloads, averaging 25
head to the car, were snipped to
points in North Carolina, South Car-
nlina anit Virginia.
ADVOCATE
11
WEEK DATES
WILL BE SELECTED AT NEXT
MEETING OF THE CAMPAIGN
COMMITTEE.
CITIZENS OE
TWELVE COUNTIES
HAVE ENDORSED THE MOVEMENT
ANI) STARTED ORGANIZATION
Althmiirh the nreliminary cam-
paign inaugurated by the Kast Ten- its regular session late Tuesday even
ncssec Association of Commercial ing, and by a vote of ten to four,
r.'v.in,,ii,:oa hoi han i iiMiiitiir for on- i rdered another bond election fol
ly a few weeks, the Kast Tennessee
Home Coming Week movement has
already 'been endorsed jby twelve o f
the thirty-four counties in this
grand division of the state and in- under the Acts of 1913 it was ques
quiries have been received by the tionable whether the court had any
committee from several of the re- options in the matter but to order
malning counties, indicating that lo- the election.
cal organizations will be started in The proposition is to vote $325,000
the near future- in 35, 40, and 45 year bonds for the
The campaign committee, compos- purpose of macadamizing about 80
cd of F. R. Miller of the Morristown miles of the main roads and the
Board of Trade, N. B. Remine of the grading of about the same amount
Bristol Board of Trade, J. L. Tweeu of new roads in the county Sweet
of the Maryville Board of Trade, and water Telephone,
p. S. Martin of the Sweetwater ! ,
Board of Trade, will meet in Knox
ville during the latter part of this
monih for the purpose of finally se
lantini? tha dates for East Tennessee
Home Coming Week and perfecting
the organization for the general cam-
paign.
Before the meeting of the commit- clease(t, although some of these in
tee it is hoped that the movement creases as in the case of the em
will be endorsed by all of the remain- poyes 0f the United States Steel cor
ing counties in East Tennessee. Com-, p0ration, will not be effective until
mercial organizations, farmers clubs, February 1.
immigration boards, women's clubs, The great majority of these in-
school, church and college societies creage3 was voluntary recognition
and fraternal orders are being urged by managers of the fact that better
to take action at once in order that busjnesr, justifies higher wages of the
their towns and counties may be wolkers, and this should result in
enrolled and their recommendations rorjia relations between labor and
.- .! ., r. n ,1 ffanarQl nlnna TTinV 1 1 . .1 .-. . . t . . .. .J 1 Al,na n
an tu UULCO anu ft- " .
receive due consideration when the
committee meets this month.
A certain week in this year, prob-
ably in mid-summer or early fall,
will be designated as Home Coming
Week in East Tennessee and adver-
DurinK that week a Home-Coming
celebration will be held in every
town snd county participating. The
1 - .. Innnl nolohlQ'
local campaigns iiu wnu.
tions will be entirely in the hands' ot
mittee conducting the general cam-
paign and co-operating with the local
organizations in directing publicity
work, securing speakers, rauroau
rates,' and giving suggestions from
, . : tn i.nitlnlia
time to llnie ronceniiiift mc
departments of the campaign. Mor
rifitOWn KepUDIlcan.
YYILL LOOK INTO BUYING ..'upon business affairs in every State
OF NEW ROAD MACHINERY ln the Union.
The very first effects and the long
Alt hough Xo Bonds Are Issued, continued benefits of these wage in
Wnslllncrton ConntT Takes rreasp these additions to the Dlll-
Aotion.
.
The Washington County Court.
which met at Jonesboro last week,
although no road bond issues were
i 1 . : 1. Hlnn
up ror consiueraiiuu, iuu
looking to the purchase of road ma-
chinery, with a view to macadamiz-
i . .1 ,. timt hava nlrpnHv haan
graded, including its section of the struction work in this country will
Bristol to-Memphis highway and the commence upon a scale that has not
road from Jonea'boro to Fall Branch, bfien approximated since the panic
Tenn. The county has about twenty- of 907 and tne workingmen and the
two miles of road to macadamize, trades related to that class of work
Eight of this is on the trans-State wij become powerful factors in pro
road and the remainder on the Fall mating the activities of general busi
Branch road. - ness a? well as in those of their own
The Jonesboro Herald and Tribune dlrect iineH
gives the following as in part the Tne improvement in demand for
proceedings of the county court: offices, stores, shops, factories, apart-
The court canvassed the returns of ments, dwellings for rent has already
the county road bond' election held reKUtod .in marked improvement in
on December 18, 1915, and found the vaiues 0f realty throughout New En
following results: For bonds, 1,729; eand and ,he great belt of the cen
against bonds, 1,847; majority against trai states of the country, and' the
bonds, 118. 'ease in obtaining mortgage money is
J. W. Crumley, Frank Haws, E. S. eVing a stimulus to building projects
Adams, J. B. Moore and W. F. Reed that is sure to make 1916 a record-,
were appointed to locate routes from hreaklne year in construction work.
rutmn ...v. rf
Jonesboro to adjoining county sites'
on which the revenue derived rrom
the auto tax shall be used named the
IV.llsMirinO' I'nilteS! From JonesbOrO
LUllunma - - -
to Rogersville via Fall Branch, to
Erwin via Emnreevme, 10 iiiounivine and value of these transactions will
via Fordtown, to Elizabethton via ne far beyond the record of any year
Johnson City, to Gteeneville via the the past. To their people condi
Memphis to Bristol highway. . tions forecast the highest, degree of
This revenue will amount from prosperity. Washington Post.
$2,500 to $3,000 per year and will In- j ' ,
crease each year. 1 vienviTii? PMPTrtVFP
The court by unanimous vote adopt- v"H'"', r' we swat nmvv
ed a petition asking for a committee
to be appointed to consider the' cost . B , .
and advbility of constructing . TJ ViolS.
bridee over no acnucxy .river near
Bailey's store. The committee will
report at the April term of court.
The tax levy for 1916 was fixed as
follows: State tax 35c, county taxi
lOllOWH. ?UllC J', VUUIIJ IHA
9w. hnnl tax 5flc. workhouse 75c.
high school 10c, court house 10c,
Memphis to Bristol highway 10c, Nor-
mai scnooi, a"c, uisirict iuuuh. iuu,; MtiSKOgee, uma., jan. t. iwo nun
making a total of $2.30 per $100 tax- fired and fifty passengers on a Mis-
,1 ...l,.nljnn , . . . I , . 0 nVtwAo fndt train
ne valuation. .
Tne county superiiuenaeni s anu
, . h.i,,h ctontino. itnmmilfu'a 16-
j luc laiwui, D.M,...,.t9 v...ii.iui.ti.
. ports were nearu snu auupieu.
Resolutions were adopted relative
I to the lives and deaths of Dr. George
R. Duncan and Lafayette Conley, de-
ceased, snort and appropriate ad-
dresses were made on the resolu-
tlorm
BOND ELECTION
Fl
ORDERED IOR M ARC H THE FIRST
TO RAISE MONEY FOR PUB
LIC ROADS.
E
OF
PAYABLE IX THIRTY-FIVE. FOR-
TY AND FORTY-FIVE YEARS.
The County Court, at the close ot
March 1. A petition containing about
one thousand names was P' Rented
to rnH
to be vailed on the date named, anu
ALL BUSINESS FORCES
I MAKING FOR GREATER
ACTIVITIES IN TRADE
sinoe December 1 the wages of
more lnan i(ono,000 employes in the
United States have been ordered in
Capital, ttllU It UIIUUUUICUI.V -siiuwo n
ciearer understanding of mutuality
0f interests s between employers
ann; employes,
These increases will add millions
0f dollars weekly to the purchasing
power of the people affected by them,
as jt will be. through every branch of
trade which distributes to the ulti-
mate consumers of this country,
1 i W 4 1 r. w .1 1
niune iui gieatfi nuiea uy hip omn-
keeper and the merchants, greater j
portation lipes and will call for lar- (
per outputs in many lines of manu-.
facture.
vvnue it is estimated mar inese m-i
creases have been granted to fully
-1 AAA rtAA nnvtimMn tliAnA la vr nnli ffia - :
i,uuu,vvmj ifiuim, mcic in mutii ic ,
eon to believe that before April next '
, uuuvie umi niHiiuri win w ICVCITIH6
similar aavances in pay, ann min
ur ill ovarii en a nrYnuf nnt on t InflllPTire
chasing power of the workers of the j
country, will be felt by the merchants j
of the United States, who will be'
cauC(j upon to meet the demands of.
cust0mers now able to buy and pay I
. ... ......... 1
for commodoties that limited incomes
have forbidden them to purchase dur-1
ing the past slx years of dui times. I
. . . i . i , c .i. i
w in rnp oneilinK u lliv MM iiik cun ,
Tne states of Maryland, Virginia.
vvest Virginia and North and South
Carolina and the District of Columbia
nnlna O vna nt KllcinaCS Wtlih
aic .111. 1 1 1 1 (, i w i .......... .... .. ...
m nuniber of transactions, volume
---- -- ' .
was shot tonight near his hom e here
H an unidentified man who escaped.
The police have no clue.
STPF.I. THilW r ABRYTNfi 2,rifl
t, PLUNGES INTO DITCH
j .
souri, Kansas jit iexa iai nam
nouna from St. louis to uaivesmn,
wnn,l.. nunnnnl A r.n tYt Irulav whan
imiiuwi,, coloifcu .tl, iu";
rne steel tram leii r.ne rails ni-ni
Rentiesville, Okla.. and plunged into
a ditch. Four Pullman coaches and
two combination coaches were strin-
ned rrom their trucks and up-ennen.
Passengers and crew suffered only a
hnri frtehf nnd shflkinc UD.
I 11 CO
I II
or BUSINESS
COUNTRY IS IN THE MOST PROS
PEROUS CONDITION OF
ITS HISTORY.
Dr SECRETARY R EG Fl E LD
Midi BUSINESS CAN BE RETAIN
ED WHEN WAR ENDS.
WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan. 10.
Secretary of Commerce Redheld, in a
memorandum on business conditions
transmitted to President Wilson to
day, pictures the country as in tin"
most prosperous state of its history.
The, warning is added, though, that
war's inflation of commerce will lat
only until war's end, and that busi
ness foresight alone will prepare the
United States for peace.
The slump that will follow the war
abroad, the secretary's summary de
dares, must find Americans ready to
take their share of the world's tiadf
unhampered by provincial notions.
False alues created by unusual con
ditions, he fears, may lull the United
States into a fancied commercial se
curity. "It, is not to be expected," the sec
retary says, "that our business move
ment will, continue in its present
form. No one dreams that we can
now or in the future maintain an ex
port movement of more than live bil
lions actual value, or that we may
sanely expect an apparent net bal
ance in our favor on merchandise
transactions of three billions in any
one year.
"It is alike impossible and unde
sirable that, these things continue.
It is impossible for no other reason,
because the world has not the power
to pay any one nation such vast
sums for any long period in addition
to the cost of the war. The nations
are not spending their incomes in
our market, but their capital, and.
vast as it is, there are limits to
which a continuance of this process
is undesirable, for it w-ould make, us
the Midas among the nations and
produce a moral overstrain that
would be dangerous.
GOVERN M E N T'S AT I I IT l E
TO TRUSTS IS OUTLINED
Washington, D. C, Jan. 10. Reas
surances to the business men of the
country regarding the policy of the
department of justice in enforcing
the Slierman anti-trust laws are be
lieved here to be conveyed in a state
ment of Attorney-Oeneral Gregory
published today in which he outlines
this policy.
The statement, issued through the'
chamber of commerce of the United
States, was in response to a sugges
tion that an expression from the attorney-general
as to the govern
ment's attitude in future anti-trust
prosecutions "might be regarded as
reassuring to the public mind" anil
"might dispel some of the uncertain
ty which heretofore existed." The
information on the subject as well as
the relationship that might be estab
lished between the federal trade
commission and the department had
been ' sought by business men
through the chamber.
In announcing the department s
policy in enforcing the law in ad
mittedly doubtful cases, the attorney-
general said that where the depart
ment was assured of the good faith
of the parties to a transaction it
would not be necessary to involve
methods of extreme penalty.
"In such a case," said Mr. Gre
gory, "the department would consider
that the just and appropriate and the
quickest way of enforcing the law
would be by a civil proceeding in
which the question involved would be
contested or a consent decree en
tered, according as the defendant de
sired, or by a notice to the parties
of the department's conclusions with
opportunity to abandon or modify
the transaction."
Discussing the means adopted by
the department to guard against un
just prosecutions, Mr. Gregory de
clared that "the person or corpora
tion against which complaints are
made, unless it has already declared
its attitude is given full opportunity
to submit its defense before any ac
tion is taken."
Regarding the department's policy
in cases where It and the federal
trade commission are both charged
with enforcing the law, Mr. Gregory
said that the department would, in
general, be guided by the principle
which governs the federal and the
state courts in cases where they
have concurrent jurisdiction.
While admitting that there was
some doubt as to the application of
the Sherman law in certain cases,
the attorney-general declared that it
was no more so than of other laws
and added that such doubt as exists
would be greatly decreased by decis
ions now pending in courts.
AGENTS WANTED.
We want agents in every district
in Washington county to solicit, sub
scriptions for The Comet. Write us
for our liberal offer. A postal card
is sufficient.
I HISTORY 01' COUNTRY; SUCH
HAS BEEN DEVELOPMENT
AND GROWTH
IIP
IF UNITED STSTES
SAYS COMl'TROI.LER WILLIAMS
IN HIS REPORT
WASHINGTON', I). C, Jan. 10.
"Development and growth never par
alleled in the financial history of any
country" is the way John Skelton
Williams, comptroller of the curren
cy, describes in his annual report to
congress, the operation of the na
tional banks under his charge, during
the period from October, 1914, to No
vember, 1915, the first year under
I lie federal reserve system. The re
port was today presented to congress.
Air. Williams gives a comparative
statement of the condition of the na
tional banks to back up his state
ment. He shows that net resource
of the banks increased in the yeai
$l,7t;,78,648, that deposits increased
$2,01. !"30,1 64, and that loans and dis
counts increased $91 7,450,502. Avail
able cash increased In the same pe
riod $862,000,000 and on November
10, l!)l,j, the reporting national bankP
had excess reserves of $891,000,000.
Tallies show the comparative condi
tion of banks in 1895 and 1915. In
September. 1895, there were 3,712 re
porting banks with net deposits o:
$1,9S!i,:iOO,000 and loans and discount
of $2,ori9,40S.4i'2, while in November.
l!)1Ei. there were 7,617 reportin'
banks with net deposits of $9,079,741,
447, loans and discounts of $7,233,
928,973.
"The reserve held by the nationr'
banks November 10. 1915. says th
report, "exceeded by $587,000,000 th
greatest of the federal reserve ac
Loans and discounts amounted t i
more than the total loans and di:
counts of all banks, including na
tlonal, state, savings and private
banks and loan and trust Companies
as late as the year 1902."
Mr. Williams says that the "banl.
ing power" of the United States
the capital, surplus, circulation de
posits, etc. of all reporting bankr;
national and otherwise, with an em
mate of the figures for non-report
ing banks, amounted in June, 1915, t
$25,397,100,000, an increase in a y:..
of about $1,057,100,000.
Savings bank depositors increase,'
to 176,256 dining the year endin
last June with total deposits of $1
997.706,013. an increase of $61,114,163.
The average deposit, however, d
creased from $444.36 to $2.83, whit
the number of banks increased from
2.100 to 2,159.
VIRGINIA'S CANDIDATE
IOR SUPREME BENCH
Bristol, Tenn., Jan. 9. Harry 11.
Shell on will head a Bristol speciii!
committee that will call on Presiden'
Wilson in Washington in the nex;
lew days in the interest of Judge Jo
seph L. Kelly, in connection with th
vacancy on the 'bench cf the United
States Supreme court, occasioned b
the death of Justice Lamar. The be
lief here is that Judge Kelly will re
ceive the support of the entire state
of Virginia, and the state having
not been represented on the Supreme
court bench In 65 years will make u
strong appeal to the President.
Judge Kelly, who is 48 years old.
is eminently qualified for the posi
tion, and would undoubtedly reflect
hisrh credit upon his state should he
be honored with the position. Tin
Virginians are expected to make a'i
earnest effort to secure the appoint
ment of Judge Kelly, who is now a
member of the Supreme court of Vir
ginia. IOR CHILDREN'S (01 OH
You cannot use anything better for
your child's cough and cold than Dr.
King's New Discovery. It is pre
pared from Pine Tar mixed with
healing and soothing balsams. It
does not- contain anything harmful
and is slightly laxative, just enough
to expel the poisons from the system.
Dr.- King's New Discovery is antisep
tic kills the cold germs raises thp"
phlegm loosens the cough and
soothes the irritation. Don't put off
treatment. Coughs and Colds often
lead to serious lung troubles. It Is
also good for adults and the aged.
Get a bottle -today. All Druggists.
ROOSEVELT REFUSES
TO HAVE HIS NAME
IT LEI) IN PRIMARIES
Minneapolis, Minn., Jan. 8. Wm.
T. Coe, of Minneapolis, announced at
a meeting of local progressives to
day the receipt of the following let
ter from Colonel Theodore Roose
velt, in reply to a question whether
the colonel would agree to his name
being placed on the Minnesota pres
idential ballot:
'"I cannot consent to have my name
filed ln any primaries, wnat I am
.trying to do is to fight for straight
out Americanism, I am not con
cerned whatever with any Individual
i myself or any one else."
. vlth frienaa ui Morruwwo.

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