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The Newport plain talk. (Newport, Tenn.) 1909-1939, August 26, 1914, Image 7

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(Copyright, by McClure Syndicate.)
Mrs. Speelman
Dressmaker
and Ladies'
Tailor
Over Driskill & Par
rott's Furniture Store
o
Dr: B. F. Bible
DENTAL URGE0N
Office Over Drug Store Opposite
the Depo'tl,
Hodge and Bolch
Barber Shop
Opposite Depot
Hot Baths Expert Barbers
For Fire insurance
SEE
Murray Stokely
First National Bank
Newport Tennessee
For Expert Blacksmith Work See
Jack Hixon
Opposite Duncan and Greer Store
KILN DRIED
GEORGIA PINE
Flooring, Siding and Ceiling
FOR M J 1 K
WALTER McCABE
Newport, Tenn.
F. S. GRADDON, Mgr.
GRAND VIEW SANITARIUM
devoted. to treatment of
TUBERCULOSIS.
A system of training and home
treatment given for those unable
to remain in sanitarium. Write
for pamphlet.
GRAND VIEW SANITARIUM
Newport, Tenn.
Shortest Line and Quickest
lime to Nashville.
Through coaches on day trains.
Through electic lichled Pulnian
Rieepers on night trains between
Knoxvilte and Nashville.
Individual lights in eacn berth.
. Travel and ship via this route.
For tu riher information, write
J.E.SHIPLEY,
Ajsst. Gen.Fass. Agt., Nashville, Tenn
a r. coorER,
Commercial Agcr) Knxrill, Ten
PTH1
. . ulllluiiouu
tan
Railroad
' Story of a Picture.
A ricture which attracts everybody's
atteutiou at the Tnte gallery by its po
sition, its size and its striking beauty
Is that of a lady riding on a white
horse through an archway Into a court
yard. She is dressed in a given velvet
riding habit of the time of Charles II..
with a long red feather iu her gray
hat. On her left stands a page In an
old gold velvet suit, with a (log by his
side. This picture has a remarkable
history, as well as numerous titles.
The catalogue calls it "Equestrian Por
trait." but it is also known as '".Nell
Gwynne," the name given it by Mil
lais. and also sometimes as "Diana
Vernon." The fact is that Sir Edwin
Landseer left this picture unfinished.
He painted the horse and its trap
pings, intending it for an equestrian
portrait of Queen Victoria. Hut he
died and left the picture unfinished,
and It was sent to Sir .lohu MM la Is.
who painted his own daughter in this
old riding costume, together with the
page, the dog and the background.
The picture was begun in 1X70 and
finished twelve years later. London
Citizen.
Habits of the Cuckoo.
It is quite a mistake to suppose that
the cuckoo neglects her egg after she
has deposited it in the nest of another
bird, declared Oliver J. Pike, iu a lec
ture at the Camera club. The cuckoo
kept a watchful eye upon her treasure
and should any accident befall It she
laid another egg in another nest. Mr.
Pike said lie believed, although it was
impossible to prove it. that the cuckoo
laid its eggs in the nest of a bird of the
same species as that by which it bad
itself been reared. Thus a cuckoo
reared by a sedge warbler laid its egg
in turn in a sedge warbler's nest. So
wonderful was the spell which the
young cuckoo exercised over other
birds that he had seen birds other than
its foster parents pause in their flight
to feed it. giving it the food which was
intended for their own young, and once
he saw a young cuckoo fed by birds of
live different species iu succession.
London Spectator.
King Grasshoppers.
The champion aeronaut is the king
grasshopper, which has the ability to
Jump MO times its length. It can also
sa il for 1.000 miles before the wind.
These grasshoppers sometimes go in
such numbers that they make a cloud
2,000 miles In extent. Its great front
lip hides a pair of Jaws as effective as
a hay chopper, and it has an appetite
as voracious as that of a hippopota
mus. A young chick finds Itself shut
Inside the eggshell and must work its
way out alone, but the young grass
hoppers find themselves the whole
nestful shut in a hardened case in the
ground made by their mother, and it
takes a half dozen of them working
together to dislodge the lid which
shuts them in. National Geographical
Society Bulletin.
Judging Distance.
safest people are unaware that the
apparent distance of an object depends
upon the use of both eyes. This fact,
however, can be strikingly 6hown.
Place a pencil so that two or three
Inches project over the edge of a table.
Then stand alongside the table, close
one eye and attempt to knock the pen
cil off by quickly hitting the projecting
end with, the tip of the forefinger. Al
most invariably the person making
the attempt underestimates the dis
tance b)r an inch or more and, much
to his surprise, misses the pencil en
tirely. ODe eyed people, accustomed
to estimating distances with only one
eye, of course have hp trouble in hit
ting the pencil at the first trial. St.
Nicholas.
Straight Talk a Virtue.
Everybody respects the man who
talks without circumlocution and who
means what he says, whose tongue is
not twisted and who goes rigiit to the
mark, never seeking to mislead or to
misrepresent. Straight talk, is a vir
tue that is practiced ...II too little. Im
agine what a different world this would
be if there were no other kind iu busi
ness, in domestic affairs, in society, in
diplomacy between employers and
workers, politicians and people, govern
ment and governed and In the profes
sional and the business world'. How
large a part of many men's occupations
would be gone if there was never any
thing but perfectly straight talk be
tween mau and man! Christian Her
aid.
Funeral Festivals.
The Greeks and the Romans never
prescribed chilling silence at funerals.
On the contrary, they regarded them
as festivals and entertainments and
chose these occurrences for the produc
tions of their great plays. Every com
edy of Plautus was first produced at
a funeral celebration.
Making Up.
"Going to the dansant tonight. Clar
ice'?" "I haven't made up my mind yet.
Reffc"
"For the love of Pete! Aren't you
satisfied with what you do to youi
face?"-Cornell Widow.
Stationary.
Fcssimist Board going up. room rent
going up. fee going up. Is there any
thing Id this blooming nrilverslty that
isn't going up? Optimist-Sure, my
grades IVlsconsI n Sphinx.
Very Particular.
Tou should launch out on the ocean
of matrimony, my boy."
"I might If I were sure of its beinp
n pacific ocean." Boston Transcript.
The fool wanders; the wise travel.
fpaufsh' rrcverb.
Music Hath Charms.
Dohnanyi, the famous pianist, tells
ll story of two Scotchmen who lived
In the same flat. Each had a piano,
upon which he Strummed iu his own
room, and one day a friend suggested
that they should run the two pianos
into the same room so that they could
play music written for two pianos.
The two men thought it was a good
idea, and accordingly the pianos were
both placed, in the same room. They
practiced diligently at a sonata for two
pianos, but with little success for some
time, the difficulty being that one had
generally finished his movement two or
three bars before the other.
At last, however, they succeeded In
finishing one movement exactly at the
same moment, and one said. "Aweel.
Donald, now that we've been so suc
cessful with the first movement, sup
pose we try the second?"
Donald looked at him In profound as
tonishment. "Eh, but. Angus." he ex
claimed, "that was the second move
ment that 1 was playing!" London
Tit-Rits.
American Catacombs and Mummies.
Recent publicity has been given to
the wonders of the cliff villages of the
Gila canyon iu New Mexico, where the
lofty pumice or tufa walls of the box
canyon are honeycombed with the ex
cavated dwellings of a nation of
dwarfs, whose mummies here and
there found, preserved by the stone
dust for centuries, are clad in woven
clothes and ornamented with gay
feathers at ueck and waist. The re
mains of an adult man of this people
measured only twenty-three inches iu
height, and the doors and windows of
their "homes in the rock" are hardly
passable by a half grown girl. Like
the dwarf temples of Yucatan of
which Le Plougeon wrote so entertain
ingly hovel, mansion, fortress and
temple, seem like toys made with in
finite pains for the children of a re
mote past; indeed, an antiquity fixed
by the best authorities at least as far
back as 0,000 years . ago. National
Magazine.
Glorification' of Futility. '
.When General Ren Butler was prac
ticing law in the courts of the District
of Columbia Jie was famous for the
striking ideas he evolved and the effec
tive methods he employed in order to
get the interests of his clients before
the jury in a favorable light.
In one case. In whicli he had a rather
poor show of winning, the time came
for him to cross examine a fellow law
yer, who bad given testimony extreme
ly favorable to the other side. Every
body listened intently for Butler's on
slaught. It was expected that he
would go after the witness with gloves
off.
"Gentlemen of the Jury." he said,
with an air of confiding familiarity.
"I would as soon think of shooting
skyrockets into the Infernal regions for
purposes of Illumination as .to cross
examine this witness in the hope of
extracting the truth." Popular Maga
zine. Superstitions of the Cingalese.
An old Ciugalese, woman who lived
in an ordinary native hut by herself
died and was buried. On the follow
ing day a large iguana (a species of
lizard which attains great size) entered
the compound of a gentleman living
close by and attacked his poultry
Hearing the noise and commotion, he
came. out and on ascertaining the cause
got his gun and shot the iguana. No
sooner had he done this than there
arose a great uproar from the relatives
of the old woman, who declared that
he bad killed her, because her spirit
had passed into the lizard. In proof of
which tbey pointed triumphantly to
the fact that it had never before been
seen in the vicinity and only appeared
after her death. Rupees finally appeas
ed the outraged feelings of the oh'
woman's descendants. Java Times.
Lee at Vera Cruz.
Robert E. Lee, as captain of engi
neers, arranged the American batteries
when the TJuited Stntes forces landed
nt Vera Cruz in 1847. Lee's brother, a
naval lieutenant, served one of the
guns, and here are Lee's first impres
sions of war. "Whenever I turned my
eyes reverted to him, and I stood by
his gun whenever 1 was not wanted
elsewhere. Oh, 1 felt awfully, and am
at a loss what I should have done had
he been cut down before me.
He preserved his usual cheerfulness,
and I could see bis white teeth through
all the smoke and din o the fire." Chi
cago News.
Trade Secret.
"Where do you get the plots for your
stories V"
"I have never had but one plot," de
clared the popular author, "and 1 swip
ed that from Romeo and Juliet All
you have to do is to change the scen
ery and the dialect" LouisviUe Courier-Journal.
Insisted on Her Rights.
Lawyer You say you told the serv
ant to get out of the house the minute
y.ou found it was on fire, and slie re
fused to go? Mrs. Burns Yes, she
said she must hove c month's notice
before shed leave." National Food
Magaiine. '
Spats.
"I sheuld like to see some spats,"
said the precise gentleman.
"Well, stick around." suggested the
new floorwalker. "The salesladies are
starting 'em all the time." Vuck.
An Even Break.
Mrs. niram Off en Your recommen
dations are rather poor, I must say.
Maid Well, mum" yez weren't recom
mended very highly to ineY ayther.
Sesraa Transcript
UTAH'S NATURAL BRIDGE.
The Secret of Its Origin Somewhat
Puzzles the Scientists.
What is thought to be the largest
natural bridge in the world Is that of
southwestern Utah, known as the
George natural bridge. The total length
of this great work of nature is about
00 feet; its widtb-i. e.. the "roadway"
is about thirty-live feet; the span in
the clear is about ninety feet. At the
base there flows a' small water course
which, during the hot months, dwin
dles to a mere rivulet.
Scientists are somewhat perplexed to
explain the' means by which nature
produced this bridge. it is thought
hardly possible that It could have been
created by water erosion, unless, as
was most uulikely. there was a very
large and swift stream flowing at the
point where the brook uow runs.
Some authorities are inclined to the
view that this bridge was due to vol
canic action, occurring ut some remote
geological period.
Although long known to the Indians,
it Avas not until about fifteen years ago
that white men became familiar with
the sight of it. Mining prospectors
were the first of the whites to see it.
since it is located in the heart of a
very rugged and inaccessible region.
The spun Is composed of a dark
brown staudstoue of unusual hardness,
and the thickness of the spau is twen
ty feet or more.
Engineers who have examined this
bridge assert that it is perfectly safe
and secure and that it is fully capable
of sustaining an Immense weight, espe
cially as the span is free from flaws or
seams. Washington Star.
JUSTICE AMD LUNCHEON.
They Seemed to Clash a Trifle, So the
Court Made a Change
It was formerly the practice of the
supreme court to sit from 12 noon until
4 o'clock continuously on ei:ch day
that it was in session. From time to
time, as the afternoon progressed, the
justices, one or two at a time, would
slip out of their seats, snatch a bite of
luncheon and return. Sometimes as
many as four or five of them would be
off the bench at once. They usually
had their luncheon brought to them by
their messengers and ate it in the little
curtained recess behind the bench, and
as the argument progressed there could
be plainly heard in the courtroom the
clink of knife :fcd fork on plate and
what O. Henry has called "the crash
of dishes on the American plan."
One day a lawyer pleading a case
made bold to enter a protest He most
solemnly inquired if he could count
upon the continuous and undivided at
tention of even one justice to the thread
of his argument "The personnel of
the court has been twice entirely
changed since I began," be said plain
tively. The court deigned no response, but
on the following Monday It was an
nounced from the bench that a recess
for luncheon thereafter would be taken
every day from 2 to 2:30 o'clock and
that the court would sit until 4:30
o'clock every afternoon. World's
Work.
Birds That Fight Eagles.
In Foula, one of the Shetland is
lands, the natives make a business of
rearing skau gulls In order to rid the
islands of eagles that congregate there
and commit many depredations. The
magnificent red sandstone cliffs that
skirt the northwestern cgast became
a favorite haunt of the eagles, and in
this Inaccessible spot they increased so
rapidly that they became a terror to
the farmers and fishermen who dwell
on this isolated spot The skau gulls
are also strong and fierce and the in
veterate foes of the eagle. In battle
the gulls are nearly always victorious,
and so the inhabitants of Foula hit
upon the novel plan of feeding and
caring for . the skau gulls, which,
though formidable to their feathered
enemies, are very peaceful and docile
when brought In contact with man.
Dallas News.
i Making a Beach.
Weymouth owes the beginning of Its
popularity as a health and pleasure
resort to an accident In 1703 a west
of England doctor whose name is now
forgotten advised oue of his patients
Ralph Allen, a prominent philanthro
pist of Bath to "bathe his body In
the open sea." By mere chance Allen
selected Weymouth, and the first wood
en bathing machine was built. Then
crowds gathered to watch the "mad
man" enter the water. But the pa
tient got better, told the Duke of
Gloucester all about It. and Weymouth
was made. London Tatler.
Encouragement.
"But she says she has never given
yon any encouragement"
"Did she say; that?"
"She certainly did'
"She told me tbarber uncle was go
ing to leave her a fortune nnd that he
had one. foot In the grave. If that Is
cot encouragement I'd like to know
what you call It" Ilouston Post.
Plenty of Jaw.
Two cockney "lidies" were discussing
each other publicly. One said some
thhig' about the other's "Jaw," or
"joje." "Grn," answered tier oppo
nent "sou've got enough Jaw fer two
sets of teeth, you 'av&'-london Tele
graph. Handicapped.
"Down In my part of the country If
a man lays 50 cents on a 6tump acd
hoots like an owl he can get a quart of
wildcat whisky."
"That wouldn't help me any. When
I'm very dry I can't hoot" Baltimore
Sua.
i
I STRATFORD HOTEL 1
I : h
Chas. VV. DeLaney, Proprietor
n unworn j. 1 1 .in. i ..I ..... T. i ,
Knoxville's leading hotel. It the heart of the
business section, Wall avenue, one block from
Gay street, lias 140 outside rooms, (JO with pri
vate baths, all furnished with brass beds, full
felt mattresses and the famous Idea! Springs.
Spacial Machants' Rate
Builds Up
B S
n 'u n , mi i I "t,AffraMjp-gK"8-' "';l'i,'"'Vfrpewlf'
i.n.ii.ll,niSMIll lrtMlftlll y
Improved in Health, and Gained- in Weight
"I had a bad stomach trouble for years, my appetite was noor and
I became so weak that I could hardly walk orwork feKaW
T 1 wonderfully improved in health, my digestion is better anJ
I have gained in weight . 1 heartily recommend it to all who need a
Btremrtheninir t,nnir " INmn ri,n
Vmol is a cod liver and iron tonic which contains
all the strengthening elements needed to build ud the
ironnrii I T ... 11 a t . i i r . .
pv-uwu. ucuuu. in 10 earoueub ior me agcu, ior del
icate children and for the run down and debilitated.
Your money will be returned if too are not Mtwfiad
liwl Vinol helped you.
MIN Dk(i, i ii,U4Y
and Drug Stores everywhere' that display this sign tW
. . . t ... . . .1. , . It,,
TTTTTtTTTTTTTTTTTTttT
Chestnut
For Shipment
Mem lock
Old Field Pine!
! - Poplar 1
21
For price, Specifications, and Other information
address
Champion Fibre Co., Canton, ll G.
.....M4.t.....I.p
J. F. WOODWARD
DENTIST
Over Glenn's Telephone No. L
NEWPORT, TENN.
Dr. Fahrncy's Teething Syrup
Relieves the pains and cures the ailments that make babies cry and fnefr
and grow sick and weak; checks l'iarrhoea; prevents Convulsions; tore
Sour Stomach, Colic, Cramps arid all Stomach and Bowel Ailment ea:
KaKiaa Cxfoat nurfot nnA
stores.' Trial bottle FREE
town, Aid., if you mention
... . miithm la, imniipi hi, ixiMim
$2,00 and 52,50 Per Day
Stren&th
Polpwood
to Canton, N. C.
2-
s
--
.-
luai mAilinm fn Vtnht. 9C rflt ft fTTUtf
by mail of Drs. D. Fghrney & Sou libera
this paper.
KEEPS BABY FROM CRYING-

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