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Sequachee Valley news. (Sequachee [Sequatchie], Tenn.) 1896-1952, December 31, 1896, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89058250/1896-12-31/ed-1/seq-4/

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GENEROUSLY GIVEN THE POOR.
San Elzeario, Tex., June 12, 9UU
Two years a(?o you were kind enough to aena
too some of Pastor Koenis Nerve Toulc, which
I gave to two poor girls wlio were suffering from
falling sickness, and they got well after using
your excellent remedy. My parish ia poor to the
utmost, but yo'T charity will be your crown, foi
your remedy so generously given a uie yw.
and bo excel
lioul, cannot out im on nnnni .v
ward.
Streator, in., Oct. 26, Ul.
PmW Koenlg'a Nerve Tonic Is the only medi
cine that ever helped one of our sisters who wa
mfferius from nervousness and sleeplessness for
ten years, ws also recommended it to many
others and it always had the desired effect. A
lady In Ohio was suffering from epileptic fits ior
several years and found no relief, until she ueed
Pastor KoeniK'a Nerve Tonic; three bottles curod
L" entirely SISTER OF ST FRANCIS.
A Valuable Book on Nervous Dis
eases and a Kamplo bottle to any ad
drehs. I'oorputieutH also get tueiueu
KoeniK. ol Fort Warne. Ind., eiuco lKS.andiaaow
Under his direction by he
KOENIC MED. CO., Chicago, lit.
Cold by Druggists at 8 1 per Cottle. GforSi
T (!?lze.1.75. 0 Bottles for S9.
"'rrin ..h h.u u..ii nTPtiarfiii nvtna itev. r aiuer
Victoria.
Kd 15. Anderson spent Christmas
in Jasper.
The Websterian Literary Society
will meet Friday night.
W. A. Drown, of Brownsville, I
spent Christmas in this city.
Miss Alta Brown, of Sequachee,
spent Christmas in our little city.
The Christmas tree given by the
Websterian Literary Society was a
tame affair.
Misses Viola and Cora Deakins,
of Ketchall, are visiting the family of
tlieir brother Mr. Lon Deakins thin
week.
Mr. Wash Kilgore while engaged
in a game ot "snap" collided with
the object of his pursuit, which re
sulted disastrously for both.
The Terpsichorean art was a pro
lific source of amusement during th
holidays. If you will read what Ci
cero said, you will find that he said:
"No man in his ssnses will dance.".
Chesterfield struck the key note when
he said: "Dancing is a silly, trifling
thin
Com nx a.
Turkey Shoot.
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thurs
day were devoted to shooting for
turkeys and about everybody took
it hand in it. Several quit consid
erably lighter in purse and wiser
by experience than when they en
tered but few failed to get turkeys
Austin Coppinger with the assis
tance of Harmon Coppinger, got
ten, two large gobblers and eight
hens. A3 Burnett succeeded in
winning lourteen but was n't
in it much afterwards, Mark
Martin" astonished himself and his
friends by getting one and no one
knows how many John Graham
and Mose Campbell cot. There
were several others who won tur
keys outside of those who put them
up. It was great fun for the guns
ners, but quite another thing for
the turktys which could not un
derstand all the battery of guns
and general hilarity which reigned
a out tham. By the way AusCt p-
imiorpr sava his turkeys cost him
ivpn dollars a-piece How about
that, Austin?
Publishers' Notice.
All those indebted to the News
nrt ren nested to pay up at once.
V: " i Ln.ltl.P hnnpfit. of our tin.
and talents and now it is your duty
trt w for the same. J'lca?e let u
l'Ica?e let
hear from you.
Tnu News.
rnrr
Washington Letter.
From Our Special Correspondent.
Washington, D. C, Dec. 25, 1896.
It may be that it is Christmas
thiit has caused white-wingul
peace to suddenly cover the war
bomb which seemed about to ex
plode a few days ago, and that
when Congress reconvenes we shad
again hear the bugle call to arms
for a war with Spain, in connection
with the resolution for the hide
pendence of Cuba that was report
d to the Senate the day before the
holiday adjournment, But it is
considered more likely that the
Senate will put in all its spare
time tighti rg the claim made by
Secietary O'ney and endorsed by
President Cleveland that the right
to recognize a new State or nation
is by the constitution conferred up
on the President alone. This claim
has raised a very important ques
tion. It cannot be considered poU
itical, in a party sense, as the ablest
lawyers regardless of party, both in
and out of Congress are divided in
opinion as to the rightfulness of
the claim. The matter is being
I carefully studied, especially by the
t Senators who" pride themselves on
their knowledge of constitutional
law. At first glance the claim of
Secretary Olney seems preposterous
lut more than one lawyer who
started out to show its unconstitii1
tionality has stopped in doubt and
almost ready to confers that the
precedents seem to be on Mr. 01
uey's Bide. It will probably sooner
or later get' before the U. S. Su
preme Court, but before then some
very leirned speeches on the sub
ject mav be expected in Congress.
Secretary Qlney may be right, but
if he is tlu'rt are a great many peo
ple who jliink the constitution is
wrong and that it should be amen
ded. It is not considered certain by
any means that the resolution for
the independence of Cuba will be
adopted by the Senate. Senator
Hale, who will lead Ihe opposition
to it, says ho is confident of defeat
ing it, and gives the following a
mong other reasons for thas confi
deuce: u We have just gone through
a campaign in which we have pro
mieed peace to the country. Is ii
consistent to pie-ent the incoming
administration with a war at the
very threshold of its existence?
True, there is a very undesirable
cot dition of affairs in Cuba, but I
believe the reports are exaggerated.
At any rate, it is true that howev
er cruel the conduct of the Span"
iards, it finds its counttrpart in
the behavior of the Cubans. It is
their way of fighting, they are dif-
f rent from us. From whatever
standpoint the question is regard
ed, there is no excuse in reason or
precedent for the United States to
interfere in this insurrection, 1
believe the Senate is rapidly conv
ing to realize this and am, there
fore confident of success in the
end." Even should the rerolution
be voted upon and adopted in the
Senate it will never even be allow
ed to get oefore the House. Speak
er Rtcd is opposed to it.
1 reeiueni, v,.t
President Cleveland this week
j formally recognized a new nation,
; by receiving ur. uouriguer as min
i:er plenipotentiary and envoy ex
traordinary of the greater republic
of Central America, recently form
ed by a combination of Nicaragua,
Honduras and San Salvador.
Parties interested in the tariff
hearings which are to begin next
week before the House committee
on ways and mentis are already be
ginning to arrive in Washington to
do a little private talking with the
individual members of the com-
mittee before the public talking be j
Kns.
Senator Pettigrew's charge, made !
on the floor of the Senate an hour i
or so before adjournment for the
Christmas recess, that the men
who control the Union Pacific
llailroad have hatched up a scheme
to make that road practically
i i . e . i t .. .
worinie-s, ii me government iore
closes its mortgage and takes pos
session, is attracting much atten
tion and seems to be worrying the
railroad lobyists, who thought they
had plain sailing ahead when the
House set aside four davs begins
ning Jan. 7, for consideration ol
the Union Pacific funding bill.
This scheme, according to Mr. Pet
tigrew, is to get possession of the
branch roads which are feeders of
the Uuir.n Pacific, and upon which
the govern ment has no lien, s t h
if the government takes hold of
the Union Pacific road a consider
able portion of its trafic can be di
verted. It is to be worked through
the floating debt of $8,000,000,
which Mr. Pettigrew thinks was
created for the purpose. This float
ing debt is teeured by bouds and
stocks of the branch lines, and Mr.
PeUigrew thinks the best way for
he government to protect its own
nd the in'eresta of those who live
along the line of the U. P. is to pay
that debt and get those stocks and
j;et those stocks and bonds. His
resolution providing therefor was
referred the committee on Pacific
railroads
Senator Butler sees no reason
why anyone should oppose his res
lution, for the appointment of a
committee of three Sedators to en
juire into the feasibility ot apply
ing the principle of direct legisla
tion through the initiative and re
erendum to the ltgUlation of the
Federal government. The report
of such a committee would interest
a great many people
A Peerless Liniment.
As a pain destroyer and cure for
rheumatism, Salvation Oil is the peer
of all liniments. Mr. Wm. II. Brown,
proprietor of Striebinger House, Cleve
land, O., writes: "I suffered from
rheumatism for twelve years and my
last attack kept me in bed, unable to
walk. I used Salvation Oil and soon
was up and about. An a pain de
stroyer this liniment has no equal."
Salvation Oil is sold everywhere for
25 cents. Try it and be convinced.
Cutting Affray.
Richard Grim 8 and John Doz
ier, both colored became involved
in a dispute Saturday and Dozier
cut Grimes severely in the back of
the head just above the neck mak
ing a wound which required seven
Pitches to sew it up. Dozier at
last accounts had not been arrested
as his whereabouts is unknown.
The Record of remarkable eures effected
enables us truthfully to say that Hood's Sarsa
jwllU U the only true Mood rmrlfier prominent
ly In tha public eye today. Get only nood's.
Hood's Pills axe Uio test family cathartic
aud liter cjedlclao. Harmless, reliable, iur.
f SEHSSELAER BICTSLEB
M GIVE SRT1SFHGTION. J f
Fitted with
Morgan & Wright
or Vim Tires,
Detachable &
S j& Sprockets,
Wood or Metal
A Handlebar.
tfc - . . -
jn
' it? x "m. m ATI nss."v
Best Value Ever Offered. Catalogue Free.
$ ETTWIIV M'F"G- CO., GreenlmNli, N.
itecttSB2B
Enterprise Paint M'f g Co.
$
V
Sole Manufacturers of
Perfecto Cottage Paint. Noxall Mixed
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$ 1
211 and 213 South Clinton Street, - - CHICAGO.
Every Intelligent,
Progressive Farmer
Ought to have a papr devoted especially to the interests of the farmer.
One ot the best publications of the kind in the country is the
in-State
published at Chattanooga, Tenn.
quachee Valley News to be a reader of this excellent publication,
nnd we have made arrangements to club the two papers together so
that we can furnish them both at SIXTY CEN TS. This ofler only
appiies to new subscribers and to those who renew and pay one year
in advance. Remember both the Sequachee Valley News and the
Tki State Farmer one year for SIXTY CENTS.
Sample copies of theTRiSTATE Farmer will be sent on request by
addressing the paper at Chattanooga, Tenn.
B&.Subscribe or renew AT OMUE in order to get the next issue.
A Collection of Celebrities.
There is probably no other pub
lication in America so successful
as the Youth s Companion in se
curing the services of famous men
and women. Think what a col
lection this is, fr a single year:
Ian Maclarcn, Rudyard Kipling,
Steven Crane, - Andrew Carnegie,
Hon. Theodore Roosevelt, Dr. Ly
man Abbott, Madame- Lillian Nor
dica, Hon. Carl Schurz, Charles
Dudley Warner, Mrs. Burton Har
rison, Dr. Edward Everett Hale,
the daughter of Longfellow, the
son of Emerson, three members of
President Cleveland 8 Cabinet, a
United States Senator, the Speaker
of the House of Representatives
and half a hundred other men and
women equally well known! The
value of such a list of writers lies
in the fr.ct that each describes or
discusses the work he is identified
with the work that has made'him
famous. An Illustrated Prospect
us of the next volume will be sent
free to those who address
The Youth's Companion,
205 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass.
Broke Out of Jail
It is reported that while the pris
on authorities at Jasper were at
tending the Christmas-tree celebra
tion of last Thursday night, the
prisoners managed to make their
escape to the number of ten among
whom was the rapist Lawson. As
far as can be learned none of the
fugitive? have been found.
fj T T A 11 A NTT.F.TI. 1
a .
V
Don't buy a
wheel until you
hare seen a '97
TrFVSSF.T.A'ETL
a
$75.00. I
Paints. United States White Lead.
ci;
T
We want every reader of the Se
OBITUABT.
. We are sorry to chronicle the
death of Mrs. Condra, of Pleasant
Hill. She was the mother of eight
children, two of whom are now in
the grave. Of those survi ving her
three are married but live near
home. Mrs Condra has been an
invalid lor twentv years. She
joined the M. E. Church, South, in
1884 and has always lived a con
sistent Christian life. During her
last illness she was patient under
all afflictions to the hour of lnr
death which occurred Dec. 14, 1806.
Mrs. Condra leaves a large num
ber of friends and relations to
mourn h(r loss. As we look at the
bereaved family, it makes us feel
sad. But this behel should con
sole that she has gone where pain
and suUering uo not exist. Each
moment brings us nearer to the
goal which she has reached and
may we so live as to approach that
moment without fear.
Her remains were interred in the
Wesley Chapel cemetery.
J. M. G,
The boys had a rather hilarious
time of it Friday between the tire
works and their natural jubilant spir
its, but boys will be boyj, and it h
well that they can enjoy life while
they are young, for as they give
place to a new generation they will
have to give to them the ?!tme bov?!!
I pleasure;
Farmer

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