OCR Interpretation


Sequachee Valley news. (Sequachee [Sequatchie], Tenn.) 1896-1952, December 24, 1903, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Tennessee

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89058250/1903-12-24/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

NO. 22.
SEQUACHEE, TENN., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24, 1903
VOL. XI.
MRS. ROUPE SHOT.
FAIRMOUNT.
Spocial to the News.
Building barns Is the ordor of the
BILL 00 LEY'S LETTER, ri
o.g
Ip m r-i " A II
dav.
!
1
! If
'V
1 r
I -
s I.
8
. f
1
" FROM
December 26th D
Attempted Tragedy at White
side, Tenn., Resulting
from a Quarrel Guilty
Party Escapes from Capture.
WHITESIDE, Tcnn., Dec. 19.
A tragedy wag attempted Thursday
wbeu George Allen, a well-known
young man of this place, shot and
perhaps fatally wounded, Mrs. Jas.
Itoupe, wife of Jas. Roupe, Jr., a
prominent citizen of this place.
According to news furnished your
correspondent, Allen entered the
homo of Mrs. Roupe, and began a
conversion with her, which ended
in the renewing of a family quarrel.
Mrs. Roupe seized a pistol from the
mantle, and fired at Allen, inflicting
a flesh wound on the side of his head
from which the blood flowed freely.
She was in the act of firing again
when Allen pulled a revolver from
his pocket and returned the fire, the
ball striking Mrs. Roupe in the back
and coming out in the groin. She
fell immediately and Allen took to
hisheels, and was supposed to have
boarded a freight train, as he was
later captured at Bridgeport, Ala.,
but escaped from the officers. The
neighbors hearing the shots, rushed
to the Roupe home, and found Mrs.
Roupe lying in pool of blood. Sat
urday she was still alive, and hopes
are expressed by the physicians for
her recovery.
All parties are prominently con
nected and the affair has caused
great excitement. Mrs. Roupe is the
wife of Jas. Roupe, Jr., and was only
recently married. She is a daugh-ter-in-law
of Jas. Roupe, superinten
dent of the mines here.
SULPHUR SPRING.
Special to the News.
Preparing for Christmas Is the order
of the dav.
Bob Smith and wife visited relatives
In Mullens', Cove Sunday and Monday.
Miss Dora Shelton returned home
Sunday after visiting relatives in Chat
tanooga.
P. H. Ealy went to Wbltwell Tues
day of last week.
. Misses Delia Carlton called on the
Miisoa Grants Tuesday.
Rev. D. McCracken filled his regular
appointment hero Sunday.
Misses Kittio and Dorcas Richards
were shopping in Whitwell Monday of
last week.
Art Grayson attended church at this
place Sunday evening.
P. S. Harris still makes his regular
trip to Mrs. Moores, starting Sunday
morning before breakfast and return
ing Monday morning.
Miss Emma Bryson visited at T. A.
Sbelton's Sunday evening.
Will Shelton and family moved back
to this vicinity Thursday after spend
ing several months in Mullens' Cove.
Euhoit Carlton and sisters, Misses
Delia and Stella, were shopping in
Whitwell Monday.
Miss Amanda Harris returned Monday
after spending a week in Whitwell.
Mrs. Will Holloway spent Thursday
evening at Billy Harris's.
Misses Lena and Emma Smith visited
at J. H. Grant's Sunday eve.
Art Grayson had a smile on his face
Sunday as long as Jas. Richard's walk
ing cane.
Rev. W. J. Shelton returned nome
Monday to spent Cbriitmas with home
folks.
Mrs. Sallie Bryson Visited the sick
Monday evening.
G. W. Harris and daughter, Miss Et
ta, went to Whitwell Friday.
Walter Holloway spent Sunday with
James Grant.
Luther Grant and Jim Harris called
atG. W. Harris' Sunday evening.
James Bryson made bis regular trip
up the road Sunday evening.
John Bailey of Sunnystde. spent Sun
day atR. E. Davis.
Rev. 8. P. Angel was In the vicinity
last week visiting sick.
A merry Christmas. Daisy.
John Lusk happened to bad luck last
week. He had just put the last course
of boards on his barn roof when It gave
sudden lurch, caved in and scattered
boards, nails and men all over a ten
acre field:
Geo. Smith has improved his farm
by building a two-story barn fifteen by
twentv.
Jacob Hetzel. who was formerly or
this place has just returned from Colora
do.
Miss Allie Brown has accopted a po
sition in Chattanooga.
Geo. Fredenborg has bought the Tay
lor place and will reside here for tho
future.
Edward Lusk hasn't bought his razor
vat so he borrowed a beer bottle from
Honry Witt, broke it and shaved with
one et the nieces.
Adam Lamb was soen in So. t air-
mount driving a wild-eyed pony 10 Inch'
us hi?h.
Hilt Houser has cone to dealing in
stock be bought a white spotted calf
from Frank Brown.
Drs. EUerbrock and Brown are going
nto the chicken business after Xmas
Capt. G. W. Brown is up from Chat
tanooga visiting bis family.
Jess Lusk took a flying trip to Jasper.
Geonre Smith and Jess Houser have
been cutting hoop poles for Frank
Brown.
Albert Brown and Henry Witt still
wear their beard and moustache which
looks like a brier patch.
The Fairmount Union Sunday school
elected officers for the coming year
which was carried on with much ex
citement.
Rev. Paul preached at the M. E.
Church Sundav night.
The decorating committee composed
of Messrs Gus Fredenburg, John Brim-
er, John Kell, Victor Johnson, and Ed
ward Lusk and Misses Llllie and Hat
tie Lusk, Ebba Johnson, Mabel and
Carrie Conner will meet at the C. r .
Church Wednesday eve and prepare for
Santa Claus.
Vol Johnson said he was going to
take a six-days turkey bunt alter a
mas. Watchout turkeys.
John Kell wears a four by Ave grin
I guess I had better quit for I see
the blir waste basket.
When you are old and cannot see, put
on vour specks and think of me.
Sweet Marie.
Flrinir is the order of .the day.
There are lots of pretty girls here
and everyone thinks she is prettier than
the other. They will have to get to-
irether to decide which is the best iook
ing. Will tell you who she is nex
t.lmn we write.
A. J. Lusk made a return Sunday
from Sequachee Cove.
Candidate for Representative.
This week the News contains the an
nouncement of Dr. N. B. Moore, of
Whitwell, for representative for the
two counties of Marlon and Franklin,
and no doubt there will bo much sur
prise as the Dr. like the old Irishman,
has not let bis "intlntions be known"
until now. We opine his opponents
will have to make a lively race to de
feat him, for he is an ideal campaigner
and can scheme without lying awake of
nights to devise plans. This is the
first announcement to appear, and con
sequently is the opening gun in the
campaign of 1904, which will be a real
actual case of merry war, or something
of tbe opposite extreme.
Mr. Moore is too well known for us to
say much about him, but he is large of
hndv and bin of brain, and if he gets in-
tn tho letrislature. which no doubt he is
HW . o
fully determined to do, we shall hear of
good work dono by him, ana no one
milliner the string.
lie Is a democrat in politics of, firm
standing.
A Frightened Horse.
Running like mad down tbe street
dumping tbe occupants, or a hundred
other accidents, are every day occuren
ces. It behoves everybody to have a
reliable Salve bandy and there's none
a good as Hucklen's Arnica Salve.
Burns, Cut. Sores, Ecicma and Piles
disappear quickly under its soothing ef
fect. 2Sc, at Wbltwell Drug Co.
DUNLAP.
Speclal'to tbe News.
Miss Edith Howard who bas been
teaching school in Birmingham, Ala.,
returned borne Saturday night to spend
tbe holidays with home folks.
Rev. Cassiday, the presiding elder
held quarterly meeting here Saturday
and Sunday.
J. C. Hoodenpyle is on the sick list
but Is improving rapidly.
S. B. Boyd spent Friday and Satur
.t Alnontlv on business.
Rev. Blllingsley finished his years'
work hero and left for bis home near
Dayton last week and after tbe holl-
in bo to Texas.
tkt. Kre nine stores in town now
We think Dunlap will be a city some
Ther will be a Christmas tree at
i!hnvlThursdV eve at 1 o clock.
I guess everyboiy Is fixing to have a
good time Cbrlotmas.
News Is scarce this week but I will
try to write more next wek.
I agreed to g nlong with the
youth that I commenced with pev
eral weeks. The lust mid about
him if the reader recollects was
that he was going to teach his boys
how to work. This was something
his wife did not like, for she knew
none were able to work except the
oldest, and she thought he ought
to be put in school, and besides
ehe knew if her husband did not
know how to work, how was he to
teach anyone else
Let that be as it will he hent his
stepson out with the hired hands
to work. After" this he began to
treat the boy with disrespect, and
finally mistreated him shamefully.
But the stepson dragged on as best
as he could, never being allowed
any privileges, and being made .a
servant of while his half brothers
were sent to school and started off
just like their father had been. So
they kept in school and never were
put to work. Thus things went on
this way until the stepson was lo
years old. He has always been
told by his stepfather that he was a
fool, and believed it until he real
ized how things actually were.
Then he goes to hi mother and
tells her that his money and oth
er effects are being squandered and
lavished on his half brothers, and
the lime has come for him to look
out for himself and tr to make
something of himself as no one
else will. So he buuehes his small
effects and starts out to try his for
tune alone. So he goes to an old
friend ol his father's relating his
troubles and asks to work part 01
his time and go to school part
His father's friend sees that his
intentions are good and at once
agrees to help him, so instead of
putting him to work he starts to
school the first thing, telling him
he can pay him hereafter. Ut
sends him to school two years and
then gets him into business at a
salary. lie lives saving, saves his
money, goes to 6ee his mother now
and then and at last he learns that
the farm, which is his by rights, is
heavily mortgaged. It became so
bv bis stepfather's extravagance
and takes things in his own hands,
tells his step father that he can
stop there, but he will manage
things to his own liking from now
on. So we leave the stepfather
sitting around on the porch of the
cross roads postofficeBmoking a cig
ar he has bought from the post
master who is doing a small busi
ness in connection with his post-
office to keep bimBelf in bread and
butter, and tells how they did
things where he come from.
So now we return to Big Sis,
whom we left when we started out.
Atter Sonny had spent every
thing the family had she was driv
en to the necessity of taking .hold
of the household drudgery and
made a fine housekeeper, and the
stepson having taken notice of all
this, concluded to take her to keep
house for him. She accepted him
as a husband, and tbey are now
ivine very happily as man and
wife, while the stepfather and two
halfbrotheT8 are living and loaSng
at their expense. So you will see
at once that the self-made man is
the man that always sueceeds.
The voung man who leaves the
farm to stek for a living generally
fails. There are too many who
would like to make a living with
out work, and this is of such fre
quent occurence that there is an
overplus of such men who go 10
our large cities, and you will fee
scores of well dressed, hne-iooking
young men ou the street corners
who haven't a dollar to their name.
But they could be making them
selves useful at home. Look
around and you will see hundreds
of young men in this shape.
The finest dressed young men
you will find loafiug on th streets
ecember 31st
THIS is the time of the year when people want the lowest prices ob-
tainable, and to satisfy our friends and customers in this regard
we have determined on an unprecedented
GRAND PRE-INVENTORY SALE
to continue between above dates and including them. It will be the
Greatest Stock Clearing Sale ever known here, and will eclipse all
the January Sales ever advertised before. : : ::'
DRY GOODS.
Calicos of 5,o grade, of the American
and other popular brands at 5c
in-nnnt. on tin era at 80
8W-cent Outings at 7c
Percales, 10-cent quality, will be sold
nt 8C
20-cent waist goods will be sold at. . .17c
25-cent waist goods will be sold at. . .20c
Worsteds at grand bargains. These
worsteds are old stock and were of
the 15-cent and 25-cent quality, and
will be sold in this sale at 10c and 15c
Heavv twilled white and blue flannel
worth 2.".e to go at .20c
Dress Goods in Meirose uiung,
Serge, and Brilliantlne, In all col
ors, crnnd values at 60c. will be Sold
for 40o
Black and White Taffeta silk, the 75o
nil si nn mialikv. In this sale 65c
v - I J
H.C
Veilings worth 20c at He
Shirt Waist Sets, 45c kind win go at. . joc
Shirt Waist Sets, 25c kind at.. . ." 18c
Shirk Waint Snt.s. 20c kind at 15C
Shirt Waist Sots. 15o kind at 12o
Comforts worth 81.00, 1.50 and 2.00
will be sold respectively for 84c,
$1.10 and 1.05. Don't miss them.
SHOES.
CLOTHING.
Women's "Rock City" shoes, worth
81.60, will be sola at ti.is
Women's 82.00 shoes will be sold
for 81. m
Women's ?1.75 Box Calf Shoe, a styl- j
isb, comiortaoie ana aurauie suuh,
mill Vib anlrl for S1.50
Our line of Men's 82.00 Box Calf shoes
will sold at Sl.Uo
Our extensive and well selected line
of Mens' 83.50 shoes will be sola
tnr Stt.00
Our 8'i.50 line of Men's shoos will be
sold at $2.00
Our 81.50 lino of Mens' shoes will be
sold for 81.10
Man's !i r.n hnnts 8:!. 00
2 dozen pair Nos. 10 and 11, Men's
heavy work stioes wortn s.uu, win
be sold for 81.05
Overcoats most all gone, have only
a half dozen left. Will sea ous me
lot at cost.
3 815.00 overcoats, sizes 37 and 88,
f, ..811.00
2 812.00 overcoats, sUes !!0 and 37,
for '
2 88 50 overcoats, sizes 37 and 38,
for 80.50
810.00 suits of clothes for 88.00
88.50 suits of clothos for
87.50 suits of clothes for 5.50
8A.50 suits of clothes for .
A 1 Ine of men's working pants wortn
81.00, will sea ior '
MENS' SHIRTS.
Sl.OO kind, ani a big line, too, will be
on sale at 84c
kind we will sell for 58c
m.oni hnc hnt.h In fancv and work
shirts, will be sold for 40c
MENS' COLLARS.
15-cent extra high collar to close at. .10c
10-cent collars will be sold at 8o
8 dozen 10c standing collars, old stock
l .. m. i ...in . r,n
UUbUlUiUI, Will DC11 b. . . ..-w
MENS' FUR HATS.
81.00 hats for
81.50 hats for
82.00 bats for
Boys' 25c caps will go at.
. . .850
..81.10
. .81.05
...,18c
A
LLEY,
WHITWELL,
The Leader in Low Prices.
TENN
are men who are working for piti
ful salaries. Our finest gold watch
chains are hanging from the pock
ets of gamblers, brokeu-down poli
ticians, &c.
All these have been well educa
ted lor a business career, but have
failed to find it. Go to the State
Prison, and you will find most all
the white men that are in prison
men who are well educated. Un
derstand I am not opposed to any
and all being educated, but it is
not right to give the boy all and
the girl none. I say it is best to
eive a cirl education sufficient to
enable her to teach if ehe should
be driven to that necessity, for she
can't go out and work like her big
bud.
Now I will close by saying that
I intend to have something to say
about the twenty fifth of December
Yours truly,
BILL DOOLEY
MARRIED.
Miss Fannie Rogers, of this place,
and Mr. Jas. Burroughs, of houth t'lttS'
hurt?, were married Sunday, 'Squire
Johnston, of Jasper, performing tbe
ceremony.
SEARLES, ALA. j
R. L. Colston and W. T. Switzer went
Birmingham yesterday.
Joseph Cain went to Birmingham
Monday.
Walter Cain is building a new House
on Cain St.
Luther Walker moved to Bookwood
last week.
Con Hall arrived hero from Petros
last week. He said he would have to
hunt him up a girl before he left. Won
der if he found her.
The Superintendent of Searlcs Mines
has been authorized by the Alabama
Consolidated Coal & Iron Co. to give
8100.00 to tho white children and $50 to
the colored children, and there are go
ing to be two Christmas trees.
(or?e and Dollle Burgess and Anay
Cunningham and wile visited Mrs.
Cain Saturday evening.
Thursday was payday at bearies,
Mairele E. Cain and Annie and Geo.
Cain are eolng to Tuscaloosa College.
Joseph Copoland and wife went to
church Sunday.
Mrs. Dollie Burgess, Mrs. Cunning
bam and Mrs. Cain don't do anything
but olav flinch now-a-days.
The miners came out on a strike last
on account of the reduction, but resum
ed work Friday. c-
TRAGEDY AT WHITESIDE.
Double Murder Occurs As Result of Alter
cation Between Whiteman and Negro.
A double tragedy occurred at 'White
side, Saturday afternoon at 3 o'olock.
Two miners, employed at the Ltna
Ceal mines, a negro and a whltaman,
while engaged In a crap game In the
waiting room of the depot, got Into an
altercation In which warm words wore
exchanged between them. '
The negro made a pass at his oppon
ent, who reached for his shot gun and
fired point blank at tbe former, tbe bul
let lodging in the abdomen.
The wounded man grasped bis enemy
by tho head in falling, and reaching be
hind bim In the last throes of the death
agony, clutched a poker with his right
band andbeat his antagonist at the base
of the skull, knocking his brains out
and killing him instantly. Before tbe
men could be reach they both lay dead
side by sidn. '
Tbe names of the parties concerned
in the killing are Cama Merciers, white,
and James Shepherd, colored.
Married at Whitwell.
Wbltwell, Tenn., Dec. 32. Leo East
erly and Miss Florence Hudson were
married Sunday.
ANNOUNCEMENT.
J, W. Kaulston of Sulphur Spring,
was in town Tuesday. ' He Is telling
some hickory to the handle works.
We are authorised to announce Dr.
N. B. Moore, of Whitwell, as a candi
date to represent the counties of Marion
and Franklin in tbe next Legislature.
Election in August, 1904.
Next week we publish another pro
gram for tbe Educational Rally to be
at South Pittsburg, Jan. ii, l'HH, sever
al changes having been made in it but
too late for correction this week.
-i jv n V TT. T A .
Bantl ytltllKadYe hit k'.niit BiKflt
Boutin)
Ihi Kind Yet
j The Sews Is only 50c a year. Read ik
Next week the News will contain an
interesting article from the pen of Un
cle Joe who again awakes to business.
Bob Lee left for bis borne at Bowling
Ureen, Ky., yesterday, to see hl nephew
MARKET REPORT.
(Furnished by C. L. Roberts, Dunlap.)
Eggs, per doz. 24o
Chickens, per lb 0o
Hens, per lb 0c
Roosters, each 1(5
Turkeys, per tt 10c
Geese: F. F., each 3"c; picked 20c
T)npL nttr Hi 7g
Ginseng, dry, per tt 84.00
Beeswax, per tt 21c
Feathers, per It) 25ct40o
Wool, Clear Washed, per tli S4c( 2-o
Wool, Burry. per tt 10c(if 15c
Tallow, per tb 3lie
Hides, (Jreen Salt per lb 5;o
Hides, Dry Salt, per lb Vc
Hides, Dry Flint, per lb luc
i

xml | txt