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The commercial. (Union City, Tenn.) 190?-193?, April 24, 1908, Image 1

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Drs. Moores & Long:,
DENTISTS.
E. Church St., Union City
Telephone 144. -
Frtr
Drs. Moores & Long,
, DENTlQrs. '
E.. Church St., LTnion City
MMER
Telephony 144.
Union
UNION CITY, TENN, FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 1908.
VOL. 18, NO, 4
West
Go
ANNER : DESCAMTI
-Manner of Ham's and Ned's Speeches and
. Their Deliverances.
v An tempt to accurately meas
ure and equate the values, positive
and negative, in the Patterson-Uar-
, - mack opening debate, or to esti
I mate the resultant impressions in
their effect upon the campaign,
would be difficult and premature.
While the issues drawn were well
defined in the speeches made, the
r discussion has hardly advanced far
enough to sift the matters in con
troversy to their closest analysis
and to bring the contestants to the
crucial test of their powers. The
1 ardent supporters of the candidates
on either side are already claiming
an advantage for.theif favorite,
.," ' but these conflicting claims would
be made if one or the other of the
disputants, in the estimation of un
biased hearers, had won a signal
' and crowplng victory. Partisans
will see and insist upon an advan
tage won by, their candidate, un
less his discomfiture r is so pro
nounced and painful aso make it
impossible of denials.
Last Saturday Go v. Patterson de
livered his first speech in the cam
paign as a formal review and de
- fense of, his administration, the
nature of which was commented
upon in these columns. Mr, Car-
, mack, although previously giving
y-oat a statement of his platform for
publication; reserved his opening
nor to establish a. party machine of
his own. This is the gravamen of
the charge which Mr. Carmack Un
dertakes to sustain, and it is on
this line of attack that he brings
his criticisms to bear upon the of
ficial acts of the Executive and the
course of his admistration.
Mr. Carmack begins his speech
somewhat after' the manner in
which Mr. Patterson began his
speech last Saturday night, with a
justification of the propriety of
his candidacy and with a severe
arraignment of his critics and
oponents for questioning his
action and his motives, arid, assev
erating that he is willing to base
the issue of the contest upon the
record of. Mr. Patterson and his
administration, he makes as the
main ground of his contention the
charge that the Governor has de
ceived the party as an apostle of
speech in the canvasor the occa
sion q the first joint discussion
"Hth $e Governor. OestmggSSb
vthis article is not to discuss .the
jits of,the questions raissd and
icisms made by Mr. C&rmack,
be manner in which they' were
l)d vv his oponent, but simply
uline briefly the characters
features of his address.
Carmack is a very able and
!nt speaker, with a pecuhar-
Uable controversial style.
idy and fluent, and is a
f sarcasm. His opening
thoroughly characteristic,
was to be expected, the
t feature of it is its pun
sarcastic quality. Indeed,
oldly critical and rhetori-
!of view it could be said
.predominant ftnd perva
of sarcasm becomes a de
itii the assault. Wit and
.rre very effective weapons
,ar, t;armack is an adept in
use of them,' but a too con?
it empTment of these weap
1 "" itheiredge. Nethertheless
Vck sustains his reputa
bold and aggressive
his speech is from be
id a direct and provoc
ipon Gov. Patterson
Istration. His speech
J the assumption that
was thoroughly in
former canvass for
litic nomination as an
Jd champion of reform,
I tie has proved recreant to
es to his party and to the
If the State, in that, atter
his purpose in a relent-
varfare to overthrow a party
line to promote and compel
a party organization of and
a people, he has used his
r and opportunity as Gover-
Jt
h
reform by taking advantage, of his
position to organize a machine as
ruthless and as objectionable as the
one he claims that he has over
thrown. In pressing this indict
ment Mr. Carmack "animadverts
upon the primary plan adopted by
the Democratic State Committee,
for which he holds the Governor
responsible, and discusses that plan
at length as illustrative of Mr. Pat
terson's purpose to place himself
in political power and control.
With this pronounced attack upon
the Governor s motives, Mr. Car
mack devotes a good part of his
speech to criticisms of the course
of the Patterson administration
and the official actions of the Exec
utive, which make , quite a list of
arraignments, and iuclude a num
ber of the Governor's recommen
dations to the Legislature, charges
of his use of official influence in
favor of or against certains bills,
his appointments to office, the ad
ministration of the -penitentiary,
the exercise of the pardoning pow
er, etc. He questions the Gover
nor's claim of service to the edu
cational and financial , interests of
the State, in the matter of the re
duction of railroad rates and in
the increase of Confederate pen
sions, in nne, Mr. uarmack does
not seem to give the Governor
credit for any valuable service to
the State.
One of the main issues made by
Mr. Carmack is on the subject of
prohibition. The ex-Senator de
clares himself in favor of State
wide prohibition. He laughs at
Mr. Patterson as a temperance re
former and undertakes to-show that
the Governor in his relations to
temperance legislation has been
inconsistent with hi9 professions,
and tnat nis policy nas been in ac
cord with the saloon interests. Evi
dently Mr. Carmack considered
his present attitude on the temper
ance question one of his strongest
points in his appeal for support.
In th.e closing part of his speech
Mr. Carmack discusses the features
of "his platform of policies which
he has previously given out for
publication. The speech as a whole
is a remarkable deliverance, word
ed with the Senator's accustomed
command and force of language
and constituting one of the most
extensive and unqualified arraign
ments ever made against a politi
cal opponent in the State.
There will be ample tune -tor
cool and dispassionate comment
upon the specific issues raised in
the discussion by the two candi
dates, and the people will watch
with growing interest the progress
of the debate. Nashville Banner.
o;:::e
3E
6z P
G R
ISSOM
m
They are guaranteed to bethe best ever offered (j
for sale to the people of this county. ; . , '
ssTHE GROCERsz
Has the exclusive sale in Union City of the
- celebrated
Golden Gate Coffee
Teas, Spices and
Extracts..........
You will find our store headquarters for all
the good things to be had in any market
::::i
Two Phones--204 and 230
E. P. Grissom
Three Delivery Wagons
.
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mm
A NEW GROCERY
We have just purchased the S. H. Stone grocery
and have added a brand new stock.
8' EVERYTHING CLEAN, FRESH and STRICTLY UP TO DATE
S ASK ABOUT PRICES, A TRIAL IS ALL WE ASK.
I FRANK P. GLASS & CO.
4
PHONE 180 FREE DELIVERY.
UNCLE JOE NAILLINQ IS STILL WITH THE
"OUR BOB" SPINS JOKES
A. Quiet Hour With His Friends in Nash
ville The Cardinal's Reception.
HOUS
:::::::: :;:: :::
! Have You Tried
(3)
iinshi
Flouri
Senator Bob Taylor, looking the
picture of health, and wearing his
Senatorial toga as unassumingly as
in the days he spent on the Ten
nessee hustings campaigning for
it, and as jolly as ever, is in the
city.
He arrived yesterday morning
from Wartrace, where he deliver
ed a lecture Saturday night, and is
stopping at the Tulane Hotel.
Tonight, at the Ryman audito
rium, he will deliver his lecture,
"Castles in the Air," with a few
new trimmings,- which he has add
ed since it was last heard. Over
4,000 tickets have already been sold
for the engagement and as usual
a crowded house will listen to Ten
nessee's idol, her "Apostle of Sun
shine." "Castles in the Air," like all the
Senator's lectures, is a delightful
concoction of wit, humor and'
poetic fancy, but if Senator Bob
would agree to substitute for the
lecture some of his experiences in
Washington, as he related them to
a room full of friends last night,
he would make a bigger hit, if
that is possible, than he has ever
done with any lecture.
For two hours he entertained his
listeners in his peculiar and de
lightful style. "I have been asso
ciating with the great men of
earth," he said. "In fact, it has
been getting so lately that nobody
can see me unless they send up
their card."
"Why, there are several of us in
the Senate that are worth $10,000,
000," he continued. "Me and Gug-
heim are worth $60,000,000,
me and Elkins are worth $20,-
000, and Aldrich and a few of
other boys are-worth $10,000,-
wl-iilo tlio vocf ronraonf oil
her millions."
I have been banquetting too,"
then he told of a banquet giv-
honor of Cardinal Gibonsjhe
gnt, which he atteniieglsl
f T,
unv wue got a
aid "Our Bob,
seen a ct
at or
they told me to call him His Emi
nence, so 1 said, "Your Eminence."
"Yes, indeed, I have been as
sociating with the big ones, and am
having the time of my life," he
continued. "I have met dukes and
! cardinals and ambassadors aDd cab
inet officers and the President and
generals and Senators and I'm real
ly not associating with common
folks at all."
And thus he talked and spun
stories while his friends roared
with laughter.
"Why, they had solid gold dish
es on the table at that banquet giv
eu to me and the cardinal. They
were as big as water buckets, gold
spoons, gold knives and forks and
everything was gold. There were
so many curious things at my plaj;e
I didn't know what to do with them,
but 1 sat close to the cardinal and
'as he picked up those at his plate
and began using them I would do
the same with mine."
Senator Taylor had a good word
for all his colleagues. "They are
treating me fiDe," he said. He was
exceedingly complimentary in
speaking of all he mentioned.
Senator Joe Bailey, of Texas, is
the greatest man in the Senate, in
his opinion easily. "I rank him
along with Webster, Clay and Cal
houn, Thurman, Blaine, Conkling;
and Ben Hill, and after hearing him
make that great speech on the
money question and three or four
other great speeches, and watching
him closely for four months, 1 be
lieve he is intellectually the biggest
men in the Senate," he said. "Cul
berson is a model Senator; brilliant,
cautious and conservative, and none
of them get away with him. Clark
of Arkansas is one of the best law
yers in the Senate; Overton of
North Carolina is. a big man, one of
the biggest there and a delightful
man personally. Foster of Louis
iana is as warm and congenial
the climate of his St
ton and
la rrpnif
"W """"
Ask Your Grocer
NONE BETTER
X
1 Dalinke-W
alker Milling Co, ;
V
KM wax
V
Ask us for prices when selling your grain.
:::::::f: :: ::::::
The Commercial! $1.00 a year, an
:".'!A!J E. HOWARD.
HOWARD B
(Successors to W. G. Re
FRESH STRAWBERRIES; RADISHES, BEAN
PIE PLANT, CELERY, NEW
only One phone-No. 14-.
y
f
I
i
I
If
a
fyidr Off QjnLijL

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