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The commercial. (Union City, Tenn.) 190?-193?, December 08, 1911, Image 1

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DR. E. M. LONG
DENTIST
Over Tute & Burchrd' Drug
Store, Union City, Tenn.
Telephones
Office J44-2. Residence 144-3
DR. E M. LONG
DENTIST
Over White & BurcharcT Dn'jf
Store, Union City, Tenn.
' - Ttk-lphori ,
Office 144-2; Residence 144-3
Union City Commercial, et Wished IS) I
West Tennessee Courier, estrtWished 1S97 !
Consolidated September 1. x97
UNION CITY, TENN, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1911.
VOL. 20, NO. 38
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iTffMESSOM,
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ACCO
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Cvirrtwhl by C. E. Zimmcjmaii Co. N. '
Of all the unhappy homesnot one in a hun
dred has a bank account and not one home in a
hundred who has a bank account is unhappy.
It seems almost foolish to put it off any longer,
when it is such a simple, easy matter to start a
bank account.
Old National Bank
Union City, Tennessee
H
SANTA GLAUS
IS COMING THIS YEAR IN AN . . '
AUTOMOBILE
AND) GIVE IT AWAY
v:
WATCH FOR HIM AT
Oliver's CROSS Drug Store
Next Monday
and see the CHRISTMAS BASKETS full of
NICE THINGS
Come and PicK One.
miwirn'O red
ULiui.no
GROSS
RUG STORE
FARM L
OANS
Si PER CENT -Ten Years -31 PER CENT
CAN MAKE PARTIAL PAYMENT AT ANY TIME
AND STOP INTEREST.
" SPRADLIN
LAND NOTES.
Do not think it will nut pay you to
come or write mo about a farm because
I live in the country between Union City
and Martin. I work where others do
not. I have about 300 farms to sell,
any size, Rtiy price, finy terms. Come
U Terrell, tenn., or write me. Four
jacks for sale. , .
37 4t U.0. Parrbii,
If. K. D. No. 8, Union City, Tenn.
For the week ended November 30
there were 213 business failures in the
United States, against 293 last week and
217 for the corresponding week last
year. '
Herbrt t Francis Sherwood claims a
decrease of more than one-third iu the
incoming tide of immigration from Eu
rope for the first seven months of this
year. , , ' j
william Mcdowell wed.
4
Cousin of McKinley Speaker Mc
Dowell's Bride.'
s
A romance of childhood days culmi
nated yesterday iu the marriage of Mrs.
Wary Lee Sturges, a cousin of the late
President McKinley and daughter of the
late J. G. McAVilliams, a former part'
ner of Mashall Field, and William W,
McDowell, Speaker of the House of
Representatives of Montana, and a mil
lionaire mine owner. '
The marriage, witnessed only by the
immediate relatives of the bride and
bridegroom, took place in the home of
the bride's mother, Mrs. Caroline W
McWilliams, 3945 Lake avenue, at 5
o'clock.
IIOVEYMOOV IX FLORIDA.
The ceremony was performed by the
Rev. Abel M. White, pastor of the Oak
land Methodist. Episcopal Church of
Kenwood.
Mr. McDowell and Mrs. Sturges went
to the marriage license bureau shortly be
fore it closed yesterday afternoon. He
gave his age as forty-rive and she forty
four. The ceremony at the home was sim
ple. A wedding supper was served to
the dozen guests, after which the couple
departed for Florida on a honeymoon
trip. From Florida they "go direct to
Butte, Mont.,' the home of the bride
groom. Mr. McDowell, a Democrat in
politics, was elected to the Montana
House two years ago and was made
speaker.
OHTATNED DIVORCE AT RENO.
Mrs. Sturges was formerly the wife of
E. Spencer Sturges, a wealtey real estate
and club man. They were married in
1903. After spending several years
abroad Mrs. Sturges went to Reno,
Nev., and established a residence.
Their divorce followed in May of this
year.
'I have known Mrs. McDowell all my
life," declared Mr. McDowell ps he de
parted for the South last night. We
attended school together in Cincinnati
Since that time we have never lost trad
of each other; and I have' renynined on
terms of close friendship With her fami
ly. When Bhe married in 1903 1 thought
I would never recover from the blow,
but, as you see, everthing has turned
out all right. We are both happy
now." Chicago Examiner.
Woodrow Wilson Club.
OFFERS $50,000,000.
New York Syndicate Would, Aid
Southern Growers.
Augusta, Ga., Dec. 2. Details of the
plan of a New York syndicate to len
Southern cotton growers $50,000,000 to
aid them in holding their cotton until
better prices than those now prevail in
can be obtained were made public here
to-night by W. II. Stayton of New York
who represents the syndicate. Th
statement was issued at the conclusion
of a conference between Mr. Stayton and
President C. S. Barrett of the National
Farmers' Union; E. J. Watson of South
Carolina, president of the Southern Cot
ton Congress'; J. Whitney Reid, secretary-treasurer
of the South Carolina
Farmers' Uuiun, and J. G. Anderson of
Rock Hill, S. C.
The conference was for the considera
tion of the means for carrying into exe
cution the plan of the New York syndi
cate. In his statement Mr, Stayton
says:
t t-r m
in a general way, my people are
ready to advance $50,000,000 to support
a plan the outlines of which are as fol
lows:
'1 The cotton owner will deliver his
cotton to the cotton buyer in his locality
who will buy the cotton and take title to
it immediately
2 The owner will receive $25 per
bale in cash on account and will also re
ceive a negotiable certificate setting forth
the interest which the owner has
whatever price may thereafter be re
ceived for the cotton.
i.'ie cotton owner may at any
time prior to Jan. 1, 1913, name a date
when he wants to finally fix the price
he is to receive and on the date that he
so names settlement will be made with
him on the basis of the prevailing quoted
price for that date
On this settlement the farmer will
be allowed the price the cotton is worth
on the date named and from this sum
will be deducted the $25 already ad
vanced to him (no interest will be
charged) and also $1 as the costvof
grading, storage, insurance, etc., to
gether with a sum equal to one-quarter
of the rise in price, which will be the
syndicate's compensation for its services.
WOULD ORGANIZE BY STATES.
"In other words, if the price does not
go up, tbe syndicate gets nothing ex
cept $1 for grading, storage, insurance,
etc., and if the price is advanced through
this movement, then the syndicate gets
The first gun in Shelby County for one-quarter of the advanc and the cot-
the, national campaign for the Presi- Ion owner the other three-quarters,
dency was hred Saturday noon .wtien "Of course, it is not possible for my
enthusiasts met at the courthouse and principals to deal directly with every in
took steps to form a Woodrow Wilson dividual farmer, nd it is therefore pro
club. . . posed that in each State there shall be a
There were about seventy-five pres- committee of three of the leading citi-
ent.. All the political factions of Mem- zens o? the State who will act as the
phis were represented at the meeting, trustees for all of the farmers in their
The club starts out with an enrollment
of 300 members, and has gone to work
with the" intention of making it 1,000
before the end of another week.
No permanent organisation was effect
ed, but a committee was appointed con
sisting of Charles M. Bryan, Dan Wolf
and David Fentress, to draft by-laws
and devise a scheme lor organization.
The present temporary organization con
templates only Shelby County, but it is
expected to extend it so as to embrace
the whole of the Tenth Congressional
District as a unit. Woodrow Wilson
clubs have already been formed at Nash
ville and Chattanooga. None of them
started with so largo an enrollment as
the Memphis organization.
The meeting was called to order by
Dan Wolf as temporary secretary, II,
F. Fisher was elected president and J.
D. Martin viee-prcsidnt. -
Among thoso present were Chas. M.
Bryan, John I). Martin, Judge-Francis
Fentress, Judge F, M. Heiskill, Marion
Evans, James A. Maline, Judge Walter
Malone, Z. N. Estes, W. M. Stanton
and Thomas A.-Evans.
Judge Jacob S. Galloway, a Prince
ton graduate apd ardent supporter of
Woodrow Wilson for the Presidency,
sent regrets that he was unable to be
present. ' - '
After a conference of the Democratic
House leaders in Washington it was de
cided that Chairman A, O. Stanley's
Steel Trust Investigating Committee
should continue its work. If Repre
sentative Littleton should vote with the
Republicans on the committee the House
will enlarge the committee by the addi
tion of two Democratic monilxTS who
will be in sympathy with Mr. Stanley.
State and will see that the farmers' in
terests are protected. JFor example, it
will be the duty of these trustees to see
that the necessary banking arrange
ments are made so that the unpaid part
of the purchase price is fully secured.
At the present price the fanner wonUl
Mjceive f per bale m cash and there
would be still due him $15 to $20. This
money must be deposited in local banks
or some arrangements satisfactory to the
trustees must be made in each State so
that this $15 to $20 is absolutely secured
to the farmer, iu order that his certifi
cate or receipt may have a real value
and be something on which he can bor
row money.
By Monday I will be ready, I think,
to suggest other plans which will be
satisfactory to us and may better suit
the planters."
NEWS NOTES.
James B. McNamara pleaded guilty
Friday at Los Angeles, Cal., to having
placed a dynamite bomb under the Los
Angeles Times in October, 1910, which
caused the dedth of twenty-one persons;
John J. McNamara, Secretary-Treasurer
of the International Association of
Bridge and Structural Iron-workers, did
not enter a plea to the indictment simi
larly entered against liim for the Times
explosion, but pleaded guilty to the
charge of having caused the explosion
of the Llewellyn Iron Works, in which
no fatalitcs occurred.
The thirty-three subsidiary companies
into which the Standnrd Oil Company
divided began their separate, individual
existence when 200,000 new stock certifi
cates containing proportionate shares in
the new companies wore mailed to the
old 6,000 stockholders of the old com
pany. .
The finding of twelve loaded revolvers
and four sticks of dynamite in the Feder
al penitentiary yard at Fort Leaven
worth, Kan., probably prevented a
wholesale outbreak of Government pris
oners.
McLean County poolers in the Homo
Warehouso Company and the American
Society of Equity reconsidered their re
jection of the salo of 12,000,000 pounds
of tobacco. " 1 ' .
One-siory house, five rooms and
hall, city water and all necessary
out buildings; lot 108x200 feet;
East Waddell street
One-story house, five rooms,
good bam and out buildings; lot
85x 1 32; South Home Street.
Two-story house, all necessary
out buildings; lot 220x192; corner
Home and Vine streets. "
85 acres five miles east of Union
City, in 11-2 miles of shipping
point; good five-room house, barns
and out buildings, fine well and
pond; under good fence.
72 acres four miles north of Un
ion City, 8-room house with fine
cellar, good well, ' cistern, ponds.
and under good fence.
76 acres, northae stof Union'City,
one and one-halt-story dwelling,
fair barn, fine well, pond and or.
chard; under good fence.
Also other desirable
country property.
city anc
We have some bargains in Miss-
issippi lands.
Let us insure your property..
m
For prices and terms
SEE
It is reported upon authority that has
reputation for reliable information
that the German Government will spend
$90,000,000 on its navy during the next
six years. ,
It is stated on the authority of an
official of the Steel Trust that it will
co-operate with the Government in se
curing an early trial of the latter 's dis
solution suit.
I
REAL ESTATE
INSURANCE
The international opium conference
which opened at The Hague will extend
the scope of its operations so as to in-
lude morphine and cocaine.
Secretary of the Navy Meyer, in his
annual report, makes a plea that there
shall be no decrease in the effective j
strength of the United States navy.
Red Cross Seal. ,
This year in Tennessee the first State
campaign has been inaugurated. It is
hoped that 1,000,000 seals will bo sold
in Tennessee. This is possiblo.and will
make possible a future permanent fund
to fight tuberculosis in Tennessee. If
everyone will co-operate in the purchase
i lie Cook
always feels
confident of 1
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pure anawnolesome
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A Pure,Grape Cream 'FTsrter
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of these seals and lend Uieir influonco
to the wholo work, tuberculosis will bo
stamped out of the State in five years.
If seals" are not on sale in your town,
yille, Tenn.
I every penny
Stamp
propose is
To summon wealth and fight for health
And beat tuberculosis:
Beat the greatest plague of all;
Oust a pall of sadness;
To treat dispairwith light and air
Aoa Jilt it into gladness.
The Elks.
Portland, Ore.,' Dec. 1. (Special.)
A commission form of government sim
ilar in many respects to that now in uso
by many of the leading cities of the
country has been adopted by tho Elks
of Portland for handling the business
of the Grand Lodge Convention to bo
held in that city next July.
iliero are ton commissioners whose
work is divided under the following
heads: General arrangements, recep
tion, grand lodge, decorations, finance,
entertainment, parades and music, ho
tels, publicity, treasurer. K. K. Kubli,
Exalted Kulvr of the Lodge, occupies
the position of chairman, correspond
ing to tho office of Mayor. Harry C.
McAllister, former State Fish and damn
Commissioner of Oregon, has been elect
ed secretary of tho coniininsion and is"
general manager of the convention.
The bian is proving verv suenesHful
I In view of tho fact that the city of
Portland w now engaged in a camnaifti
for the adoption of the com mission plan
in the government of its municinal
affairs, the progress of the Elks iiU.
iug watched with interest.

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