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The commercial. (Union City, Tenn.) 190?-193?, September 12, 1913, Image 4

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THE COMMERCIAL
Manhall & Balrd, Union City, Tenn
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1913.
Entered at the post office at Uaioa City, Ten
eee. as second-cuus man matter.
Announcements.
For County Judge.
HKFLEY. We are authorized to announce J. A,
Heflevas a candidate for County Judge of Obion
County, subject to the Democratic primary
election Dec. 6. mi.
For Register.
MTT.VRH. We are authorised to announce R. B
(Bob) Milner M a candidate for Keifint.Tr of
Obiou County, subject to the action of the
Democratic primary election Saturday, Decem
ber 6, 1913.
WItKERSOV We are authorized to announce
W. T. Wilkerson a candidal.- for Register of
Obion County, subject to the action of the
Democratic primary election Saturday, Decem
ber 6, 1913.
MOFFETT. We are authorized to announce
Henry Moffett a candidate for Reuisterof Obion
County, subject to the action cf the Democratic
primary election Dec. 6. ivu.
For Sheriff,
NOAH. We are authorized to announce T. P.
Nonh as a candidate for Sheriff of Obion County.
subject to the action of the Democratic primary
election Dec. 6, 1913.
HICKMAN. We are authorised to announce I
M. (Jim) Hickman a candidate for Sheriff of
Obion County, subject to tne action ot tne
Democratic primary election, Saturday, Dec.
6, 1913.
For County Court Clerk,
TAWjEV We are authorized to announce C. S.
Tnlley a candidate Cor re-election to the office
inf Comity Court Clerk, subject to the action of
the Democratic primary election, Saturday,
Dec. 6, 1913.
For Clerk of Circuit Court.
GOLDEN. We are authorized to announce H.
M. (Monroe) Golden a candidate for re-election
to the office of Clerk of Circuit Court of Obion
County, subject to the action of the Democratic
primary election Saturday, Dec. 6, 1913. .
s For Trustee.
SANDERS. We are authorized to announce J.
II. Oohnsy) Sanders a candidate for re-election
to the office of Trustee of Obion County .subject
to the action of the Democratic primary elec
tion Dec. 6. 1913.
MORRIS. We are authorized to announce W. C.
Morris as a candidate for Trustee of Obion
County, subject to the action of the Democratic
primary election Dec. 6, 1913.
Welcome to Union City.
It may seem to some extent like a
matter of commercialized public spirit,
but we are, indeed, genuinely glad to
welcome the home-comers to Union
City. We are glad from a disinterested
point of view. Of course the- idea of
inducing the wanderers home was first
prompted by n effort to stimulate the
fair. But far more deeply interested
are we in the old associations after all,
and this we believe is the true spirit of
the occasion. Welcome, home-comers,
o Union City; welcome in the name of
home, hallowed with memories: wel
come to the scenes of childhood,
schooldays, manhood and woman
hood; welcome home again for a grand
reunion, and may this be one of the de
lightful periods in the oases of a life
time.
Welcome!
(By Mrs. Geo. A. Gibbs in the Woman's
Edition of the News-Banner.)
You wanderers, who forth have fared
Upon your various quests,
By memories of by-gone days
Now lured to be our guests,
How joyfully we press your hands!
How gaze into your eyes
While hopefully we search their depths
Where recognition lies.
A welcome waits in every home,
All latch-strings hang without;
We hope to make you feel with us
That time has faced about.
Again, as in our childhood days,
We'll fish in Woodland creek,
We'll rob the orchard, as of yore;
The cider mill we'll seek.
We'll visit all the neighbors 'round,
Take dinner, stay all night,
Look up the girls we used to court,
The boys we used to fight;
A Government By Conscience.
There is a bit of moral history bound
up with the progress of the present
Tariff Bill through Congress which
patriotic Americans cannot afford to
overlook.
The movement in favor of tariff re
form is no new thing. One of the great
est tariff debates in history was that of
1S87, in which Roger Q. Mills led, and
Benton McMillin, Sunset" Cox and
William McKinley took part Nothing
has been added to tariff reform argu
ments since that day, except that the
discussion of wages has been shifted by
the Democrats from the question of
wages per day to that of the labor-cost
of products obviously the only rele
vant consideration. This accepted, the
question rests now where it was in 1887.
It is the people that have changed
The national conscience has gained in
sensitiveness. The tremendous impera
tive of the word ought" in modern
And tired, at night, we'll dream of her politics was undreamed of by the men
We regret exceedingly that Senators
Shields and Lea and Congressman Gar
rett could not be with us at the fair and
home-coming. Each one of these gen
tlemen mailed personal letters, saying
that it was altogether impossible for
them to be here for the reason that im
perative duties held them at the Cap
ital. Every vote is nooded to pass Dem
ocratic measures, eHpecially the tariff
and the banking bills, and while we
had built up high hopes of their pres
ence in Union City, the fair is a very
small matter compared to the work that
devolves upon the Democratic Congress.
A few weeks ago when the invitations
to be here were accepted, there was no
thought of the present length of the
session of Congress, and should ad
journment have taken place these gen
tlemen would most assuredly have been
with us. Home-comers send greetings
4o them with the kindost regards.
The Woman's Home-coming edition
of the News-Banner contained some
very fine historical and editorial mat
ter. It was altogether an interesting
paper, embracing topics by the ladies
cf the staff discussed and related in an
attractive way. We are reproducing
the lines by Mrs. Gibbs to home-comers.
This is an exceptionally fine con
tribution to the occasion, and one of
the best efforts from the pen of local
talent we have seen. The paper has
been read largely and it deserves the
highest encomiums.
Col. Ii. T. Whitesell had a persona
letter this week from Congressman
Finis J. Garrett expressing regrets that
he could not be with us at the home
coming. Mr. Garrett, as well as the
Senators, fully expected to be here after
the adjournment of Congress, but that
body is yet in session and they were
compelled to remain. It is to be re
gretted, but the duties of these gentle
men are at present in Washington.
of 1887. Here and there was one who
saw clearly the moral issue bound up in
extricably with a policy which involved
taxing one man for the pecuniary profit
of another. In some instances Sun
set" Cox is the most conspicuous ex
ample he drove his message home
with brilliancy and power. But for the
most part the moral side of politics was
considered "bad form." Grover Cleve
land seemed to the politicians as one
crying in the wilderness. The question
was discussed on the grounds of eco
nomic expediency. Unimaginative gen
tlemen, genial, statistical and essentially
superficial from the standpoint of scien
tific economics like William McKinley,
were the favorites.
To-day, the tariff appeals of McKin
ley would fail upon deaf ears, it is
but just to his memory to add that the
change began in his day, and that he
himself had part in it. The last three
years of his life shook him out of his
smug and narrow philosophy. On the
business side, McKinley had begun to
Should we forget, should we forget Jsee that the tariff policy of high pro-
The staunch, true friends of long ago? tection was too narrow for the markets
Who, in the. dear old days,
Lulled all -our night-born fears to rest
By knowing mother-ways.
Already country hams are on,
Fat fowls in "durance vile,"
While pies and cakes, those crispy sweets,
We're baking all "old style."
You see you're mighty welcome here
At home in this old town;
We're glad when you succeed in life
And sorry when you're down.
Now in the many coming years
We hope are yours to live,
To you, your wife, and all your folks,
A welcome we would give.
As all in ancient times well knew
That "all roads lead to Rome,"
We hope for you at autumn time
All roads will lead back home.
Friends of Other Days.
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should old acquaintance be forgot,'
. And days o' auld tang syne?
Burns.
Should not the same tie bind us yet,
That bound us yet for weal or woe?
Should we forget, should we forget
The strolls beneath the listening moon
With jocund friends, before regret
gloom?
Should we forget, should we forget
"The tender grace" of other days,
The beaming eyes, which our own lit,
Eloquent of the warmth of praise?
Should we forget, should we forget
of the world. But there was moral
change within. him also. He talked
more of duty and destiny, and less of
dollars. Never a man in advance of
his time, he felt the change which came
Or grief had dropt their shades of over American politics.
Twenty years ago tann aeoate con
cerned itself chiefly with prosperity;
to-day it concerns itself chiefly with
justice. From tne material point of
view, the country is doing better than
ever before, in spite of its silly and
hampering tariff laws. (This proves
The old school boys, and friendships nothing, of pourse; we are richer than
dear, - ever before in spite of our silly and
The mirthful girls, who always met hampering currency laws.) But the m-
Us with frank smiles of goodly cheer? justice of the tariff, the special advan
tages given the few by legislation inim-
A Woman Trial.
"Then your husband was all right
at first?"
"Yes sir."
"Later lie become morose and irrita
bly To what do you attribute the
cb-'nge?'?- ,
"The home toam took a slump."
Should we forget, should we forget
The sweet love story we have heard,
From fairest lips when eyes were wet,
And hope and fear our young hearts
stirred?
Should we forget, should we forget
The lovely form that walked with us.
But which long since with deep regret
We laid low in the silent dust?
Should we forget, should we forget
The old hearth stone of bygone years,
Round which our family band oft sat,
And where we said our evening pray
ers? .
Should we forget, should we forget
The soft white hand that stroked our
head
Long, long ago as fond lips met
Our own, and we were tucked in bod?
If I forget, if I forget i
The holy past and each dear friend
I loved so truly, oh then let , ' 1
Me go 'twere time my lifo should
end!
Eugene F. McSfeddek.
Financial Statement of Obion Coun
ty Sept. 1,191 3.
Money on hand, $G0,155.50; appor
tioned and unapportioned, $58,027.13;
county funds, $6,714.30; unapportioned
school fund, $8,903.19; unapportioned
fund, $494.10; apportioned school fund,
$46,903.50; apportioned road fund,
$18,380.80. '
The above shows the county to be out
of debt. One year ago it was in debt
and the Court borrowed $9,000, and
later tle quarantine and smallpox epi
demic cost $3,000, which made $12,000
extra expense. This has bcerf paid, and
all other expenses of the county, and
still we have $6,714.30 on hand. This
makes the county $18,714.80 better off
than it was one year ago.
Geo. R. Kexnky,
County Judge.
When the bowels feel uncomfortable
and you miss the exhilerating feeling
that always follows a copious morning
operation, a dose of HEKBINE will
set you right in a couple of hours. If
taken at bedtimo you get its beneficial
effect after breakfast next day. Trice
50c. Sold by Oliver's Red Cross Drug
Store. " dvt
ical to the interests of the many, the
degrading effect on our political life of
the interference of big business in gov
ernment these things have revolted
the American people.
A govern raent by popular intelligence
is an old ideal, and a high one. But a
people may be brilliant in mind and
quick of perception, yet selfish and
eold, perpetuating injustices, deaf to
tho voice of the weak and oppressed.
The highest ideal is government by
popular conscience. Democracy must
come closer and closer to the ideal of
the new earth, wherein dwelleth right
eousness. The Underwood Tariff Bill is
significant as a Btep toward the ideal.
St. Louis Republic.
WHY IT SUCCEEDS.
Bkcaie It's For One Thing Only, and
Union City People Appreciate It.
Nothing can be good for everything.
Doing one thing well brings success.
Doan's Kidney Tills are- for one thing
only.
For weak or disordered kidneys.
Here is Union City evidence to prove
their worth.
T. L. Lancaster, Deputy Circuit Court
Clerk, Union City, Tenn., says: "When
I usod Doan's Kidney Tills some time
ago, they gave me relief from kidney
trouble and I publicly recommended
them. I feel justified in confirming
that statement."
Lancaster is only one of many Union
City people who have gratefully indorsed
Doan's Kidney Pills. If your back
aches if your kidneys bother you,
don't simply ask for a kidney remedy
ask DISTINCTLY FOR DOAN'S KtDNEY
Pills, the same that Mr. Lapcaster had
the - remedy backed by home testi
mony. 50c all stores. Foster-Milburn
Co., Trops., Buffalo, N. Y. "Whea
Your Back is Lame Remember , the
Name." .
Maritime Maxim. '
There's many a slip 'twixt the cup
and the end of the yacht race.
Bon Air Coal, best and cheapest, at
Union City Ice & Coal Co.
p
fS)
Chas. Williams
Frank W. Adams
T R Y
O U R
W. & A. Special Coffee
AND OUR
Deer-Head Tea
"The 20-Gallons-to-the-Pound Tea" .
These will please anybody, no matter how particular
in taste.
Williams (Si Adams
" Special Agents
"WE DELIVER THE GOODS"
Telephone 421 306 East Main Street
DAVIS
BROS.
INSURANCE
Fire, Accident ALL KINDS Life, Tornado
Representing the Best Companies
We write Both City and Farm Policies
Your business solicited and will be appreciated. Office over
Oliver's Drug Store. Call on us.
Office Phone 261, Residence Phone 8. . Union City, Tenn.
mMM
m
AVE YOU TRIED
EY
m
fJ5
JERS
CREAM
FLOUR.
Ask Your Grocer for
NONE BETTER
lahniie-Wab Milling
C: Ask us for prices when selling your grain,
P. - ? '
P.:::::: ,::::::::::
IPSaiiriL'
From the Manufacturer to Your Home
No dealers. No commission men.
The oldest manufacturers in the Southwest.
Endorsed by the best musicians
A. N, S2BCKSON
With The STARR PIANO Manufacturing Co.
TELEPHONE 505
STRAY MULE. Strayed from ray
stable Aug. 7 a blue Lorse mule about
15 hands high, with crop off one of the
ears, and white place on tho back about
the she of a hand under ths saddle.
Mule is about 15 years old. Any infor
mation concerning the whereabouts of
the mule will bo paid for. Rural phone
Clavton No. 7. V, B. Cole,
28-4t Hickman. Ky., R.F.P. No. 2.
3. C. BURDICK
Wholesale and Retail
Rcelfoot Lake and
Mississippi River
Fish Game
Oysters in Season.
New location, East Main Street
rhone 185. UNION CITY, TENN
Union city fair
Osic!) County eni Huss-Ceasis' Day, Ttosday, Septer 1 1
To Jack Morris.
Sallie Bird Morris vs. Jack Morris.
In Chancery at Union City.
In this cause, it appearing from the
bill, which is sworn to, that Jack Mor
ris, the defendant, is a non-resident of
the State, he is, thereforo required to
appear, on or before the first Monday
of October, 1913, before the Chancery
Court of Obion County, Tennessee, at
the courthouso, and make defense to
the bill hied against him in said court
by Sallie Bird Morris, or otherwise the
bill will be taken for confessed and set
for hearing ex-parte.
It is further ordered that this notice
be published for four consecutive weeks
in the Uniou City Commercial.
This September 2, 1913.
GEO. A. GIBBS, JR.,
23-4t Clerk and Master.
W. M. Miles, Solicitor for Compl't.
To Morris Whitsey.
Morris Whitsev vs. Mattie Whitsev.
Chancery Court, Obion County, Ten-
nessee.
In the above etyled cause it appearing
to the Clerk and Master from the bill of
complaint, which is sworn to, that the
defendant, Mattie Whitsey, is a non
resident of the State of Tennessee and a
resident of the State of Kentucky, so
that ordinary process of law cannot bo
served upon her. It is therefore heroby
ordered that the said above named de
fendant appear before the Chancery
Court of Obion County, Tennessee, on
or before the First Monday of October,
1913, that being the first day of the
regular October term of said Chancery
Court, and make defense to the sai.i
bill, or the same will be taken" & con
fessed by her, and the said cause set for
hearing ex parte as to her. It is further
ordered that publication of this notice
be made for four consecutive weeks in
The Commercial, a weekly newspaper
published in Obion County, Tenn.
This Sept. 1, 1913.
GEO. A. GIBBS, JR.,
23-4t Clerk and Master.
W. M. Miles, Sol. for Compl't.
Non-Resident Notice.
S. F. Howard vs. Mrs. C. F. Barry ct al.
Chancery Court, Obion County, Ten
nessee.
In the above styled cause it appear
ing to the Clerk and Master from tho
bill of complaint, which is sworn to,
that the defendants, Mrs. Georgia Barry,
Frances Barry and Margaret Barry, are
non-residents of the State of Tennessee
and are resident's of the State of Ala
bama, so that ordinary process of
law cannot be served on them. It is
therefore hereby ordered that the said
above Darned defendants appear before
the Clerk and Master of the Chancery
Court of Obion County, Tennessee, on or
before the
FIRST MONDAY OF OCTOBER, 1913,
that boing a rule day of said Chancery
Court, and. , make defense to the
said bill, or the same will bo taken as
confessed by them, and the said cause
set for hearing ex parte as to them. It
is further ordered that publication of
this notice be made for four consecutive
weeks in The Union City Commercial,
a weekly newspaper published in Obion
County, Tenn. 22-4t
This August 25, 1913.
GEO. A. GIBBS, JR.,
Clerk and Mastcri
Swiggart & Swiggart, Sol. for Compl't.
Land Sale.
G. Robinson vs. Andrew Tottenct als.
Chancery Court, Obion County, Ten
nessee. '
By virtue of an interlocutory decree
of the Chancery Court of Obion County,
Tenn., made at its April term, 1913, I
will on
Saturday, September 27, 1913,
at about 2 o'clock p. m. at the eatf
door of the courthouse in Union City,
Tenn., sell to the highest and best bid-
dor the following described property,
to-wit: That property known as the
Salem Colored Baptist Church, and be
ginning at a stake, the southwest corner
of said lot or tract and in the north side
or boundary line of Vine' street, runs
thence east 103 feet to a stake; thence
north 65 feet to a stake; thence west 108
feet to a stake in the east boundary line
of Dobbins street, formerly known as.
Braes? street; thAwe south wih aid
Dobbins street 65 feet to the beginning.
Said sale will be on a credit of seven
months, and in bar of the equity of re
demption.. A note drawing interest
from the day of sale with good personal
tecurity will bo required of the pur
chaser, and a lien will bo retained on
the property as further security.
This September 2, 1913.
GEO. A. GIBBS, JR.,
3-3t . Clerk and Master.
You want CLEAN brez-i. Then ask
for DAHNKE'S wrapped in GERM and
DUST-PROOF WRAPPERS.

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