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The commercial. (Union City, Tenn.) 190?-193?, January 29, 1915, Image 4

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THE COMMERCIAL
. Entered at the post office at Onion City. Ten
nessee, as second-class mail matter.
Marshall & Baird, Union City, Tenn.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 1915.
Announcements.
For Trustee.
BRATTON We are authorized to announce S.
R. Br.itton as a candidate for Trustee of Obion
County, subject to the action of the Democratic
party. Election August. 1916.
JACKSON. We are nuthorized to announce W.
B. (Ellis) Jackson a candidate for Trustee of
Obion County, subject to the action of the
Democratic party. Election 6rst Thursday in
August, 1916.
the strawberry Industry here this
year on the Herring farm near
Union City. He has one 'hundred
acres and will probably have more.
There will be a home market and
shipping' advantages which we have
not before enjoyed at this point.
Therefore there is every inducement
under the sun for strawberry raising
in the county, and our people will do
well to investigate the matter thor
oughly and if interested, place your
orders for plants in time for the
present season.
Improving the Corn Yield.
Edward Gallrein. a Jefferson
County boy, 14 years bid, won the
Boys' Corn Club championship for
1914. He raised 144 bushels of
corn on an acre of ground at Valley
Station at a cost of 14 cents a
bushel.
Other good records were made by
boys who belonged to the JeOison
County Corn Club. A 13-year-old
boy at Crestwood produce! 177
bushels on an acre of poor hill laini
at a cost of 16 cents a bushel. A
Seatonville boy of the same age grew
ninety bushels at a cost of 11 conts
a bushel and a 12-yer-old boy at
Valley Station made a record of 10.r.
bushels at an expense of 17 cents a
bushel.
Young Gallrein. who niad- the
hest record in the Jefferson County
Corn Club, also made the highest
yield of corn at the lowest cusi per
bushel in the State. Ten ears of i
corn sent by him to the State Corn !
Show- won the gTand sweepstakes j
in the adult and boys" classes, a !
notable distinction. I
The boys of the State are going
right ahead in the laudable enter-:
prise of showing the adult farmers i
how to increase the yield of corn.
j
There is much encouragement for j
those who expect to enhance the
quality and quanity of their corn j
crops during the year 1915. There
never has been any overproduction j
or corn in nentucy. The coming
crop should be a large one. If it
cannot all be used at home there
will be plenty of customers for it at
prices that will pay for raising it.
The above is from the Louisville
Courier Journal and shows what in
terest is being taken by the boys of
Kentucky in corn growing.
The Commercial is not informed as
to what the boys are doing in Ten
nessee. Several exhibits have been
made and very fines ones, too. But
Obion County, which should get in
the competition has done very little
yet. And this brings us to the prop
osition made at the last meeting of
the Union City Business Men's Club
to offer prizes to the boys of Obion
County for the best corn product on
a given amount of ground. The club
should get together on this proposi
tion at once so as to give the boys
time to get their seed and prepare
the ground.
ine Dest results, we gather, can
not be obtained this year for several
reasons, but the work should start
now nevertheless. Obion County
is one of the richest corn countries
It is the principal crop, and while
much has been done to develop the
culture there is much yet to be done,
and it may be that the secret of the
best results lie3 with the boys of the
county. The prize crops should be
jgin this year, and then when the
crop is made the seed for the next
crop should be selected. and the
prize arrangements should continue
indefinitely until the county is
brought up to the test of its possi
bilities in corn raising.
The club couldn't get into a better
business thaa to encourage better
farming methods and co-operation
with the farmer in this movement.
The Ouster Bill.
The Shelby and Davidson delegates
in the Legislature have joined hands,
it is said, to fight the Elkins ouster bill
after the recess. Tbe fight was a fail
ure in the Senate by a vote of 28 to 8,
and no doubt will be tbe same in tbe
House. Shelby and Davidson together,
however, may be able to summons a
larger vote, but bardly strong enough
to defeat the bill, we are led to believe.
Mr. Elkins is one of the ablest mem
bers of the Legislature. He is honored
Luke's Philosophy.
(By' Luke McLuke in Cincinnati En
quirer.)
It takes a woman with four closets
filled with clothes to keep on indignat
mg because she has nothing to wear.
Bundle day was sucb a success that
we should have a Ragman 's. day and
get rid of tbe scarecrow skirts and
waists and greasy wrappers that tbe
women wear around tbe kitchen.
One man sits around and talks about
what he is going to do while the other
man goes ahead and does it. Then the
first man will begin knocking tbe sec
ond man because the latter is so pros
perous. "
A city man sees so much silk and
plush and paint that it would be good
for sore eyes to get a look at a rosy
ckeeked country girl wearing a calico
dress.
Once upon a time a man got a change
of heart and he decided that he would
never again lie to his wife, and that he
would tell her the truth about every
thing. He got home at 6 p. m., and at
with more committee appointments ? tf:i5 p. m. tbe ambulance was hauling
than usually falls to the lot of one j him to the morgue.
member, besides the chairmanship of The old-fashioned man who used to
a most important committee. He has 'come home loaded down with groceries
prepared this bill very carefully andjanj bundles now has a son who is too
with very good authority, no doubt. ' high toned to carry a bundle, but who
TI,.- r.oi ! ...
.luc iuuuw.ng ic suiuc vi we - brings home a package almost every
night.
visions of the bill:
(1) Tbe complaint or peiition for
writ of ouster may be filed upon the
relation of citizens and freeholder
without the concurrent of any law
officer.
i'2) It is made the duty of the Gov
ernor to direct the law orikrs, when
ever knowledge comes to him that tbe
provisions of the act are beiLg violated,
to file a complaint or petition for writ
of ouster against tbe offendicg oScial.
and it is made tbe duty of tbe iaw on
cers to obey tbe instructions of the.
Governor.
Another reason for the high cost of
living is because every woman wants to
be dressed better than other women.
It is strange how foud of bathing a
boy is in summer and how much be
dtrtests bathing in winter.
A woman is as certain that her brand
is the best brand of baking powder as
a man is that bis brand is the best brand
of booze.
When a woman is around SO and still
unmarried she does an awful lot of talk-
us girls."
he : Maybe you can't blame the fellow
f who is engaged to a girl for six or seven
j years before he marries her. Maybe
;:::::::::o::o:::::.:g
HAVE YQU TRIED ft
JERSEY
CREAM
FLOUR
Ask Your Grocer Tor it
7
NONE BETTER
aliiike-Walker Milling Co.
Ask us for prices when selling your grain.
?:: :: w:: :::: ::s :;:: ;;
ft
ft
ft
CHARLES WARD
UPHOLSTERER
High-Class work in Furniture
Repairing and Refinishing.
First-Class Work Guaranteed.
Prompt Service.
Leather Work a Specialty
Box Couches Made to Order.
Concrete Block, Church Street, first do&r
west of Metcalfe's Laundry
Telephone 438.
TAXICAB
$1 Pays for The Commercial 1 Year
(3) It is m&p thp ,1nrv r,f lw r.
cm upoD the request of relator chiircs 'Dg about
and freeholders to aid and assist in :
prosecution of ouster suits.
(4) Tbe Governor may, with the
employ additional counsel to aid aDdihefigures that be is getting the best of
assist in the prosecution of ouster suits. ? 11 because the longer he is engaged the
o) An appeal to the Supreme Court ' shorter he will be married..
does not suspend or vacate the judgment
or decree of the lower court, but the
same remains in full force and effect
until reversed by the Supreme Court.
Strawberry Industry.
Mr. Ed Dietziel, chairman of the
strawberry committee of the Busi
ness Men's Club, and who is vitally
interested in the culture in Obion
County, calls attention to the fact
that he is now arranging to secure
plants for those who anticipate the
cultivation of strawberries, or who
want to make an experiment in the
culture. Mr. Dietzel wants us to an
nounce that plants for the present
crop can be secured for $1.75 per
thousand. This is the Klondike va-
xiety and should be set out 7,000 to
the acre. The ground should be
prepared before hand and plants
should be put out the first of March.
Therefore there is not much time to
lose if you want plants. The order
should be placed with Mr. Dietzel so
that he can supply everybody in
time for planting.
independent the farmers of the low
er part of the county and over in
Gibson. On lands that were never
as fertile as those in Obion farmers
have made many times the money
that Obion County farmers have in
orn and wheat growing.
JVIr. Wade, of Kenton, will start
Savagery Up-To-Date.
Formerly men were divided into en
lightened, civilized, barbarous and sav
age classes. JSowadays great nations
combine the characteristics of the four
classes.
Naked American Indians killed women
and children and rated as savages.
German air raid results in the murder
of children and women in an English
town and an official bulletin boasts of
an achievement that is limited, pretty
nearly, to that kind of murder. Civil
ized and enlightened, yet proud of acts
which would have delighted the soul of
a raiding Sioux or Apache in the period
of border warfare, modern warriors pre
sent a spectacle somewhat discouraging
to students of the progress of the hu
man race.
The Baltimore Sun makes the point
that although civilians are punished
severely if they make war upon the
armed forces of an enemy, "aerial sol
diers may attack women and children
without loss of military honor." The
Sun is officially lacking in the spirit of
uncritical neutrality to say that, so far
as the world has learned, the Allies
have confined their air attacks to forti
fied towns and armament depots, while
the Germans have thrown bombs indis
criminately into unfortified towns. Be
that as it may, civilization and enlight
enment have much for which to answer
when any nation considers the wanton
destruction of tbe life and property of
non-combatants, without a sufficient
military purpose, a warrantable feature
of warfare.
lhe aboriginal Americans toma
hawked individuals at arm's length
and could not plead ' the natural and
inevitable consequences of war" in de
feuse. But when air raids which could
not possibly result in anything more
than desultory killing and crippling of
civilians are planned by military officers,
and boasted of afterward by official press
bureaus, "the natural and inevitable
consequences of war" will not do as
an answer to the charge of savagery.
Louisville Courier-Journal.
It may sound good to the orator. But
I doubt if a $10 a week garbage wagon
chauffer ever swells up with pride when
he hears the orator about the dignity
of labor.
Every married woman wonders why
her husband can't keep up his life insur
ance without paying the premiums.
You may imagine that the war in
Europe is a calamity, .But a real ca
lamity is when the mother of five small
children in a poor family is so sick that
she can't get up and work.
We notice that the Union City Com
mercial, one of the best printed and
best edited weekly newspapers in the
South, has recently installed a Linotype
machine, model 15, Mergenthaler. This
paper is not only a credit to Union City,
but it is a credit to tbe State, and the
citizens of Union City should be both
proud of the paper and its editors,
Messrs. Marshall and Baird. Kenton
Herald. -
Read Frank W. Adams' Saturday
special in this Issue.
Fine Feathers.
No play of our times has won greater
applause or become more a part of our
native drama than "Fine Feathers,"
the humanly gripping drama by Eugene
Walter, which H. H. Frazee will present
here on Tuesday, Feb. 2, at the Rey
nolds Opera House.
It delighted thousands of playgoers
iu the Cort Theatre, Chicago, where it
was first produced by Mr. Frazee on
Aug. 12, 1912, and when presented last
season in the Astor Theatre, New York,
ran the season out, following which it
continued to play during the summer
on a special trans-continental tour to
the Pacific Coast.
"Fine Feathers," which runs four
pets, comes direct from its triumphs in
New York and will be presented here
by a specially selected company. Tbe
story deals with the struggles of a young
married couple, Mr. and Mrs. Bob Rey
nolds, who are endeavoring to maintain
a Staten Island establishment on the in
stallment plan with a salary of $25 per
week. Bob is a chemist in the munic
ipal government of New York, his im
meuiate uuties comprising the testins
of a certain brand of cement required
for the construction of a dam. His wife
has become weary of the arduous house
hold duties on his small salary, and
when Bob's old school chum, John
Brand, now the head of the big cement
company, offers him a bribe of $40,000
to pass a grade of cement slightly in
ferior to the sample offered for the test,
tbe young man is confronted with his
wife's demand that he accept the money
which will provide luxuries, or live with
out her.
He finally agreed to become a party
to the graft, and it is upon this premise
that Mr. Walter has built up what is
claimed to be tbe most virile and talked
of drama of his entire career. And bis
career includes such sterling successes
as "Paid In Full," "The Easiest Way,"
"The Wolf," and "The Trail of the
Lonesome Pine." .
A Long Jump.
From a place on a big detective force
to the.pastorate of a down-town church
is the long jump Lincoln McConoell
made in a very short time. Hear him
at the opera house Feb. 1.
P. GRISSOM
THE OLD
RELIABLE
GROCER
-TWO GOOD LINES.
Golden Gate
Teas and Coffees
Chase & Sanborn's
Teas and Coffees
THE VERY BEST THE WORLD AFFORDS
FRESH MEAT MARKET THE (BEST
Meat, Flour, Sugar, Coffee
Everything!
All handled in an up-to-date, sanitary manner.'
No order too large. No order too small.
E. P. GRISSOM
Phones 204-230 Washington Ave.
To any part O
of. City for &DC
CLAUD ANDREWS
Phones 79 and 100
TAKE LIV-VER-LAX AND
FEEL WELL.
Don't suffer from the ill effects of an
inactive liver, such as headache, indi
gestion, constipation, lack of energy
and low spirits, when for a little money
you can get a remedy of proved merit.
GRIGSBY'S LIV-VER-LAX will get
your liver right and let you enjoy bet-:
ter health and brighter spirits. LIV-
VER-LAX acts naturally and effective
ly. Has none of the dangers and bad
after effects of calomel. Sold under an
absolute money refund guarantee at 50c
and $1 a bottle. Each bottle is protect
ed by the likeness of L. K. Grigsby. .
For sale by Oliver's Red Cross Drug
Store. advt
J. C. BURDICK
Wholesale and Retail
Reelfoot Lake and
Mississippi River
Fish Game
Oysters in Season.
New location, East Main Street
Phone 185. UNION CITY, TENN
Good Job Printing a Specialty Here
(MILLING HOSPITAL
A Modern Surgical Institution
Graduate nurses in attendance.
Rates reasonable.
Dr. W. A. Nailling, Surgeon
Mrs. L. E. Rodecker, Supt.
Phone 41. UNION CITY. TENN.
.
j .EAT. OU R jl-
nnAVIIPIlA fffe n wm n 1 1 1 1 1 1
mUlntno ontAU
"
ITT'L orJnrfc llllll
i ii 1 1 u wi ir u mm u unit
- '
MADE BY
1J irH hi lf
Cafe 1
CALL YOUR GROCER OR
I II II If I I IH No
.
Offic
DR. JAKE H. PARK
DENTIST
Room 1, Nailling Building
TELEPHONE 136
UNION CITY, TENNESSEE
Y0UNGBL00D
VETERINARY
HOSPITAL
Y0UNGBL00D & Y0UNGBL00D
GRADUATE VETERINARIANS
All calls answered day or night.'
Ivocation Office and Hospital opposite Hou
ser's Livery Stable.
Telephones Office 428; Residence 207
Union Gty, Tenn.
NN3X 'AID NOINH
a!Pl!na 2n!in.l!l 'SI 01003 fiWO
1D3JJHDHV
0 1AV1 d H
N.,C.&St.L.Ry.
N.. C & St. L. TIME TABLE
lave Union City. ,
EAST BOUND
5 ..7.45 a.m. No. 8 8.05 p. n
No. 93..9.S5 p.m.
WEST BOUITD.
No. 526.47a.m. No. 4 12.50 p.m
no. ya.7.10 p.m.

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