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The commercial. (Union City, Tenn.) 190?-193?, May 24, 1918, Image 4

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THE COMMERCIAL
Marshall & Baird, Union City, Tenn.
Entered at the post office at Unioa City. Teo-
euee. u aecond-elaas mail matter.
FRIDAY, MAY 24. 1918.
Democratic Ticket
Chancellor V. H. HOUfKS
Circuit Judge R. A. EcKINS
County Judse JOEL B. WADDRIX
Attorney General THOS. O. MORRIS
County Coart Clerk R. H. BOND
Circuit Court Clerk THORMAN TALI BY
County Trustee T. J. KASTERWOOD
County Register R. B. MII.NER
Sheriff J. U. HICKMAN
ANNOUNCEMENTS.
For State Senate.
CALDWELL. We are authorised to announce
D. P. Caldwell a candidate for the Senate
branch of the Tennessee General Assembly, to
represent the counties of Weakley, Obion and
Lake, subject to the action of the Democratic
Party..
rorKepreaentative.
B R ATTON. We are authorized to announce S,
R. Bratton. Esa . as a candidate for represen
tative from Obion County in the Tennessee
General Assembly, subject to the action of the
Democratic party.
For Floater.
GRIFFIN. We are authorized to announce Dr.
J. Frank Griffin as a candidate for Floterial
.Representative in the Tennessee General As
sembly, to represent the counties of Dyer,
Lake and Obion, subject to the action of the
Democratic party.
DR. I. GLOSSON
VETERINARIAN
Phone 12. Main and Third Sts.
UNION CITY. TENN.
DR. A. J. TAYLOR
Veterinary Surgeon
Cumberland Phone 544, Rural Phone 240
Office at Houaer'a Stable
UNION CITY. TENN.
THE MILLING HOSPITAL
THIRD YEAR
A Modern Surgical Institution.
Graduate Nurses in Attendance.
DR. W. A. NAILLING Surgeon.
MRS. L. E. RODECKER R. N Supt.
Union City, Tenn. Phone41.
DR. JAKE H. PARK
DENTIST .;'
Office: Room I , Naillinp Building
TELEPHONE 136
UNION CITY, TENNESSEE
d. C. BURDICK
Wholesale and Retail
Reelfoot Lake and
Mississippi River
Fish Game
Oysters in Season.
New location, East Main Street
Phone 185 UNION CITY. TENN
MOVED!
Morris Shoe Shop,
Now in the Marshall Build
ing, upstairs, next door to The
Commercial office. Machinery
and equipment for first-class
work.
We solicit your patronage.
W. H. MORRIS. Mgr.
Isnt It True After All?
Comparatively few dogs are really
valuable. Most of them are roving,
Insanitary, voracious, disease-breeding
animals, dangerous to human life
and a constant menace to vested
rights. Any condition which com
pels the abandonment of one of the
most ancient and profitable agricul
tural avocations, that of sheep rais
ing, Is not only a hardship to the
entire farming interest, but a genu
ine calamity .to the country as a
whole. The sheep is an invaluable
animal becoming extinct, whereas
the dog is a worthless animal, in the
main, which is endured and defended
purely upon shallow sentimental
grounds.
Whoever allows his dog to run at
large, especially at night, fails in his
duty to his neighbor and to the
country. .
Surgeons agree thkt in cases of
Cuts, Burna, Bruises and Wounds,
tho FIRST TREATMENT is most im
portant. When an EFFICIENT an
tiseptic is applied promptly, there is
no danger of infection and the
wound beglrs to hoal at once. For
use on man or beast, BOROZONE is
the IDEAL ANTISEPTIC and HEAL
ING AGENT. Buy It now and be
ready for an emergency. Price 25c,
60c, $1.00 and $.1.50. Sold by Oliver
Drug Co. , I
Dr. Witherspoon in Union City.
Dr. J. A. Witherspoon, of Nash
ville, a guest of Dr. Turner, chair
man of the county Red Cross War
Fund, was one of the Red Cross
speakers of the week, appearing at
the Methodist Church Monday even
ing. He was greeted by a mammoth
audience, filling the large auditori
um, and he made a fine impression,
Dr. Witherspoon many years ago
was a pupil of W. R, Moore, the
famous teacher at Glass in Number
Fourteen. He was related there. He
is a native of Maury County, locating
and beginning the practice of medi
cine and surgery in Nashville thirty
five years ago.
Dr. Witherspoon said he was very
glad to meet the people of this
county. He had known many of
them, and it was a pleasure to get
back again.
The American Red Cross is a body
of 22.000.000. growing from an
organization of 25,000. He review
cd the history of the work and its
extensions since the present war,
The service is extended to the
trenches and everywhere there is an
American soldier or his ally. The
rolling canteen is an example of the
work, which is carried by the Red
Cross mother to the trenches, with
hot drinks or refreshments, there
ready when a lull takes place and
the soldier is almost famished and
exhausted. It was the Red Cross
mothers who aided the suffering
Italians when the Germans had de
moralized their ranks with false
propaganda of American treachery.
This was an act which practically
alone restored the morale of the
Italian Army and is holding them in
vincible to-day against the Germans
and Austrians.
Speaking of the relationship be
tween the French and American na
tions, Dr. Witherspoon referred to
the War of American Revolution,
when LaFayette and Rochambeau
and their French soldiers came to
the aid of General Washington. After
one hundred years the Americans are
in France to pay this debt of gratitude.
German cruelty and the abject
horrors of. German warfare have
made it impossible to enter into
peace terms. There is no record in
the, history of the world of such
fiendish and brutal methods of war.
This is the way the Kaiser has un
dertaken to terrorize and bring the
world to its knees with fear.
There is no such thing, says' Dr.
Witherspoon, as a German-Anferi-
can. He is either German or Amer
lean. Many Germans left their na
tive land because of military and
political oppression. They came to
America which sheltered them and
showered luxuries upon them. They
should be taught that they owe their
loyalty to America, but if they re
fuse to be taught then they should
be made to understand the code of
American honor.
Dr. Witherspoon paid a very high
tribute to the Red Cros3 mother and
said that it was a privilege to give
to that great organization of angels
of mercy. Ho met a very cordial re
ception and his address was warmly
applauded.
DE. BOND EESIGNS.
Seven Connection With Hospital at
Bolivar After 18 Months Service.
Bolivar, Tenn., May 16. Dr. J. B
Bond has resigned as superintendent
of the Western Hospital, to take
effect on the 19th. It is understood
that hU resignation was brought on
account of friction with the board
Of control. Dr. Bond has served
faithfully as superintendent of the
institution for the past 'it months,
succeeding Dr. Walter Stewart. Dr.
Bond will return to hit home In Un
ion City and resume tho practice of
his profession.
Killed in Auto Accident
Gilbert Brooks, about twenty-one
years of age, whose home is in the
vicinity between Limbs and Sharon,
was killed Sunday afternoon between
four and five o'clock in attempting to
cross the I. C. R. R. track at Rives.
Young Brooks and his father, Chas.
Brooks, sisters, Misses Irene and Mil
dred, and friend, Luther McWright,
were in a new Ford car. They were
in Union City for the Rod Crocs ex
ercises and were returning home.
Arriving at Rives ttyey drove south
to the I. C. grade crossing and start
ed over. A train going south was
overtaking them, and Gilbert did not
stop his car until it was on the rail
road track. Then he killed his en
gine. The other occupants of the
car Jumped and Gilbert got out on
the running board of his car prob
ably to push it off the track, but the
locomotive caught him and threw
him against a railroad sign post, and
when he was picked up the skull of
his forehead was crushed. He
breathed for a while but never
spoke. The others were shook up
but not badly hurt. Gilbert was tak
en to the office of Dr. White, and
then his remains were removed
home.
The accident is indeed the cause of
general regret and sympathy by the
friends of the family and by others
who are interested in the work of
the Red Cross, and in charge of the
exercises in Union City.
The kindest condolences are ex
tended.
The Soldier on Crutches.
Good for Obion.
At the Red Cross speaking at
Obion last Sunday afternoon, con
ducted by Hons. R. A. Pierce and J.
L. Cochran, a voluntary subscrip
tion to the Red Cross of $1,387 was
donated by the liberal and patriotic
citizens of that place. When the
speakers had finished they were not
expected to call for a collection, but
the well known merchant, Mr. Luth
er Moffatt, proposed, as long as the
crowd .was present and It was con
venient to do so, a subscription be
offered. He offered to head the list
with $100. There was no second,
but when subscriptions of $50 were
proposed several responded, and then
$25 and down the line to one dollar.
Several children subscribed and said
they would pick strawberries to pay
the amount. A fine spirit, this; but
they are awake everywhere now.
Kaiserism is to be stamped out and!
America is the boy who Is going to
do his part.
School Teachers, Take Notice.
My Dear Superintendent: The
next State examination for teachers
will be held July 19 and 20. Please
encourage all for whom there Is any
chance to-pass to tako the examina
tion, but discourage others from tak
ing it. The standard for school
teaching 13 too low in the minds of
many. This is shown by those who
take the examination. It is not the
work of boys and girls but is a man's
and woman's work.
It is costing the State too much to
employ a grading committee to read
the papers of manyhundreds of'ap
plicants who, judging from their
papers, should know before they take
the examination that they cannot
pass it.
Permit only those who will be
eighteen years of age by September
1 to take the examination. Do every
thing you can to raise the standard
of school teaching in your county go
that to be a teacher means to be a
person of some ability. Your schools
had better not run at all than to be
taught by inefficient teachers.
Very truly yours,
S. W. SHERIfILL, State Supt.
May 15, 1918.
Rationing of Manufacturers.
No manufacturer using sugar for
manufacturing will be permitted
after May 15 to purchase sugar with
out the surrender of authorized sugar
distribution certificatea lasued by the
State Food Administrator' and en
dorsed on the back by the buyer.
This rule applies to manufacturers
of candy, soda water, beverage syr
ups, ice cream, soft drinks, and
others.
Full list with percentage allow
ance for each, blank forms, and in
structions for obtaining certificates
may be found at office of County
Food Administrator.
Yours truly,
. .. G. C. CLOYS.
"My Four Years in Germany."
Ambassador James W. Gerard's
widely read book, "My Four Years
in Germany," relating his expert
ences as representative of the United
States Government in the center of
Prussianism, makes a stirring patrl
otic propaganda as rendered into film
form by Charles A. Logue, who pre
pared a scenario, and by William
Nigh, who directed last Sunday
night at the Knickerbocker Theatre
when the film received its premiere
presentation, there was hardly a
minute when the house did not ring
with applause that turned into
cheers. All the wily diplomacy
with which the heads of the German
nation sought to deceivo the United
States thru its presentation, all the
atrocities witnessed by Mr. Gerard,
such as the mistreatment of the Eng
lish prisoners, the deportation of
helpless Belgian women, perpetrated
without regard for any sense of in
ternational law these and a large
assortment of vlew3 of Allied troops
on the march make capital seeing for
the man who goes into the theatre
ready to have his emotions stirred
against the common enemy. Motion
Picture News.
Reynolds Theatre Monday and
Tuesday, May 27 and 28. Matinee
daily at 2:30.
For -the stomach and bowel dis
orders of babies McGEE'S BABY
ELIXIR is a remedy of genuine mer
it. It acts quickly, is pure, whole
some and pleasant to take. Price
25c and 50c per bottle. Sold by
Oliver Drug Co.
He came down the stairs of the
laughter-filled grill
Where patriots were eating and
drinking their fill;
The tap of his crutch on the marble
of white
Caught my ear as I sat all alone
there that night.
I turned and a soldier my eyes fell
upon.
He had fought for his country and
one leg was gone!
As be entered silence fell over the
place:
Every eye in the room was turned up
to his face,
His head was up high and his eyes
seemed aflame
With a wonderful light, and he
laughed as he came.
He was young not yet thirty yet
never he made
One sign of regret for the price, he
had paid.
One moment before this young sol
dier came in
I had caught bits of speech in the
clatter and din
From the fine men about me in life's
dress parade
Who were boasting the cash sacri
fices they'd made;
And I thought of my own paltry
service with pride,
When I turned and that hero of bat
tle I spied.
I'll never forget the hot flushes of
shame
That rushed to my cheeks as that
fellow came.
He was cheerful and smiling and
clear-eyed and fine
And out of his face a white light
seemed to shine,
And I thought as he passed me on
crutches: "How small
Are the gifts that I make if I don't
give my all."
Some day in the future in many a
place
More soldiers just like him we'll all
have to face,
We must sit with them, talk with
them, laugh with them, too,
With the signs of their service for-
eve.' in view,
And this was my thought, as I look
ed at him then:
Oh, God, Make me worthy to stand
with such men.
Edgar A. Guest.
Judge B. L. Matthews.
Mr. J. B. Brown, of the vicinity
of Glbbs, hands us the following no
tlce of death of a former Obion Coun
ty citizen:
Judgde R. L. Matthews peacefully
entered into rest about midnight,
Saturday, March 23, 1918, after suf
fering more than ten years with
paralysis.
He started building his Christian
monument when he was a young
man eighteen years of age and he
builded it upon the solid rock of
Jesus, for he entered tho Civil War
as a nurse about the time of his con
version, and he has often said he
lived a more devoted Christian man
ip every way. As he started his
monument he continued to build on
to the end of his life, for he was a
true Christian man in every way.
Robert Layton Matthews was born
in Obion County, Tenn., May 25,
1843; departed this lifo Saturday,
March 23, age 74 years and 10
months. ,
He was married Jan. 7, 1868, to
Sarah J. Bynum. To this union was
born three children, Mrs. J. D. Thom
as and Mrs. Leila Cootley, north of
Monett, and O. D. Matthews, of Webb
City. Death claimed his first com
panion.
On Nov. 24, 1880, he was married
to Miss Bettie Jenkins. To this un
ion was born ten children, Mrs. J.
H. Peddy, of Muscogee, Okla. ; Dr.
Arnett, of Hawaiian Island; Roger,
of Monett; Mrs. Orvall Hemphill,
north of Pierce City; Archie, Bculah,
Radah, Lloyd and Floyd, who made
up the home circle, and Robert
Loren, who died in infancy.
Mr. Matthews moved to Lawrence
County in 1881 and bought a farm
five miles northeast of Monett, where
he lived until a year ago, when that
farm was traded for another. He
was a successful farmer and accumu
lated much of this world's goods.
Was elected to the office of Judge of
Lawrence County Court and in this
as In other things in life he was a
success, for he served his county
honestly and Impartially.
Funeral services were held at Lib
erty church Monday, March 25, con
ducted by Rev. L. A. Smith and Pas
tor E. R. Stribling to tho largest
crowd that ever assembled at that
place.
Besides his companion and chil
dren he leaves fifteen grandchildren,
five great grandchildren, a number
of relatives and a host of friends to
cherish the memory of a noblo and
Just man. MRS. W. M. D.
You've tried the rest, now try the
best Jersey Cream Flour.
GOVERNMENT REPORT
OLD NATIONAL BANK
UNON CITY, TENN., MAY 10, 1918
RESOURCES
Loans and Discounts.
United States Bonds.
Stock in Federal Reserve Bank
Banking House, Furniture and Fixtures
Due from U. S. Treasury.... -
CASH AND SIGHT EXCHANGE
Liberty Loan Bonds
War Saving Stamps
Claims, etc "..
TOTAL
LIABILITIES.
Capital Stock
Surplus and Profits
Circulation .....
DEPOSITS
$409,760.83
50,000.00
2.700.00
5.500.00
2.500.00
144,706.59
29,925.00
52.87
21.00
.. $645,166.29
$75,000.00
33,664.21
49.300.00
487.202.08
TOTAL .V.: $645,166.29
OFFICERS
R. P. WHITESELL. President. S. WADDELL, Vice Pres. A. J. CORUM, Vice Pres.
J. S. ROBERTS., Vice President. A. L. GARTH, Cashier.
DIRECTORS.
i ; Pol. ; WoJJ.ii a i rr.,m h a fwk r h rkk a 1 r.artk
E. A. Glover, G. B. DriskiVj. P.Verhine, J. S. Roberts, R. P.Whitesell
WE WANT YOUR BUSINESS
Why Not Feed DAMCO?
Danco Feed is 1 5 per cent of the richest part of the corn.
ITS ANALYSIS:
Fat - f 7.00
Protein ,--! J - 10.00
Sugar and Starch 65.00
Crude Fibre - 7.00
This is cheaper than corn and on the present market
it will feed out at least 25 per cent more than
straight corn, pound for pound. At the present prices,
you can put 1 00 pounds of flesh on growing hogs run
ning on clover at $10.00. Several progressive feeders
have used it and all have made big profits in feeding it.
This is a by-product of our Jersey Cream Meal.
Dahnke-Walker Milling Go.
We hope May brings sunshine, joy and happiness to
all. If not, why not? Even the birds come forth every
morning singing, rejoicing and praising God. And yet
they know not how they will be fed. But you do. You
know you can call Grissom and get all you want to eat.
We have everything in Groceries and everything in Fresh
Meats. All the home-grown Vegetables; also New Beans,
Potatoes, Strawberries, Oranges, Apples, Bananas, Grape
fruit Also everything in lunch goods for picnics.
So don't go hungry but eat, eat, eat
E. IP. GRISSOIVII
Three Phones
Union City.
Two Fords
-f EGGS ORN?
-A MONEY V 1
BACK j . 1
uirwm.iMK, jji run na ft
PICKEti M SCRATCH j
POVDERi feed M
Tl Lllrr. unrt t IjtV MAKES HENS 3J
-COL PURINA rM MY" lay LH
'If Chicken Chowder
won t make your hens
lay. they must be
roosters
If you want more eggs,
otder today.from .
Sold by the Cash Grocery Company, Union City, Tenn.

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