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The citizen. (Frederick City, Md.) 1895-1923, March 01, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89060092/1912-03-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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i Vol 90
’ I BALTIMORE & OHIO
THE SHORTEST ROUTE
*4l via
j WASHINGTON
TO
■ FLORIDA
All Tickets Permit Stop over at
the national capital
4 Ask Ticket Agent For Full Informa
tion regarding
:j special tours
jKpfi JANUARY 30,
FEBRUARY 13 and 27, 1912
I dec. 8-tf.
J. E. SCHELL & CO.
(Successors to Wallis & Schell),
manufacturers OF
Light and Heavy Harness,
■ COLLARS, SADDLES,
I BRIDLES AND TRUNKS,
4< North flarket Street, next door to John
Klsenhauer,
Frkdbkick, Md.
W*hn ve constantly on hand all goods from
thecher.pest to the best, and will always sell
!Mtitan city prices. Afuillineof
* BAENI I. SADDLES. BRIDLES, COLLAR?
!'*, BRUSHES, BITS. LAP ROBES
# Kioßsk ULANKKTA FLY NETS,
HM everything kept to a flrst-class Harness
Store. KE'AIRINO neatly done at short
notioe and low prices. AS-Cal I and see us.
THE NEW
PEARRF
DRUG STORE!
I ® 18 SOUTH MARKET STREET
i:re you will find
rything a complete
ig Store should have
ONES. [july 24-tf.
Hermann]
& SON j
WER AND DEALER IN jj
ALL KINDS OF /
its & Cut Flowers |
SIGN WORK, Etc. i
16 West South Street |
BOTH PHONES.
S EXAMINED FREE f
rt Optician permanently em- Y
ii at ottr store to examine ♦
yes and properly adjust the J
s. Save your broken lease, Y
an match it. Satisfaction Y
nteed. . . Y
GLASSES, X
SPECTACLES, £
FRAMES, %
MOUNTINGS &c. |
LANDIS’ I
ng Jeweler of Frederick. X
Look for the name
BIG WATCH. j
THE CITIZEN.
FREDERICK, MARYLANJ), JTRII3A.Y MORN L>s T GE MAIITCH 1, 1912
| M. L. Etchison ||
II The Store of Careful Service, ii
(i
11 _____________ 11
SHOWING NEW FALL STOCK
BED ROOM FURNITURE 1!
DINING ROOM FURNITURE ii
| PARLOR FURNITURE j!
LIBRARY FURNITUNE
DEN FURNITURE ii
( > 1
J | j
ii Everything for the Home ||j
In Good Furniture and Good Bedding I
II PICTURES. PICTURE FRAMING. |i
MOST COMPLETE STOCK MOULDINGS I i
I! IN THE CITY. S
iii Z
j | .. T PI E .. .
X
i| Etchison Furniture Store j
Ij | M. L. ETCHISON. j
! i Undertaking a Specialty Service and Equipment Unequalled X
■ I I Store Phone 355 House Phone 425 2
| | oct. 1 ’O7 t-f.

t TTT i
1 THE MODEL! j
I TELEPHONE No. 272. !!
• o o <!
| ECLIPSE SHIRTS. THE BEST IN THE WORLD. st.oo and $1.50. J|
J See South Window for the latest ideas in shirts for men. This is the well- J |
♦ known Eclipse Shirt and you cannot find anv better shirt for the money or < >
f any money in these United States. ~
I The Eclipse is made right, fits right, and wears right, it is of the best ma- J J
terials possible to get for shirts and they are put together to stay. J J
MEN’S TIES AT 25c and 50c. 1 |
The entire new line of Easterlies are ready for your selection and you will * J
find here only the kind that wear well, slip well, and tie well. A large <>
variety of exclusive styles in either stripes, figures or plain colors. ~
ODDS AND ENDS THAT YOU CAN GET FOR ALMOST X
j l NOTHING. i
j X Corsets that are only one of a kind in nearly every size from 18 to 30 are
) J reduced to 25c to 48c, formerly jti.oo to {2 00. ' J
Hosiery for Men, Women and Children is now only 10c, 15c and 23c, for. j|
• merly selling at 25c to 30c. •
| Blankets that sold for $2.98 are now ir.gS. 1 t
Muslin Underwear is marked to half price for regular stock the only one of 11
f a garment. Oj J J
Curtains either swiss or lace are marked at less than half for samples that
♦ are slightly soiled. 1 >
Children’s Coats are going at hall price and less lor good sensible all wool 1 >
4 garments. < 1
Remnants and Remnants all over the store give you a chance to save •| \
good money and get reliable fabrics ot cotton, silk or wool. j j
} JOH& D. HENDRICKSON.
• jau 80. tf 1902 ;;
~ ' I
The cliance to look over oar UKOCKKIKS
because its the very bestof Its kind; because ;
t eclipse auy other within a radius or many
a mile, and because Its your chance to catch !
"on the tty” many a satlslaclory purchase.
To buy wnat you want, at the price y uu want
to pay. means Success for you and also, lor
us because it is likely to secure for us your
future trade.
THE BEST ALWAYS
F. COLUMBUS KNOTT,
Successor to liesant A Knott
Next to City Hotel.
oct. l’tl-tW
REMOVAL NOTICE.
THU HUM OK
J. E. R. Wood Alban M. Wood
WOOD & WOOD
Attorneys-at-Law
FREDERICK. MARYLAND.
Wishes to announce that they have remov
ed their olllces from suile No. 12, Old Central
Bank Building to
SDITS No. 1
THE PEOPLE’S FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY’S ANNEX
No. 23 COURT STREET
(Opposite the Post Building)
’ and will occupy them on and after April 1,11111
i mar. 31 tf.]
COAL! COAL!
- All Coal Under Cover.
’ NO WATER, NO SNOW. NO DIRT,
EVERY POUND IN THE TON COAL,
ALL SIZES, ALL KINDS.
Ami only the best qualities coal, possible
i prices. Give us a call.
Seasoned Wood taken in exchange for
| Coal
We always pav the highest market
price for Hay and Straw either bailed or
1 loose. Get our prices before you sell.
J. M. NEWMAN & CO.,
22 East Patrick Street,
i nov. 2i i9c2-tf Frederick, Md.
feb. 24-tf.
I
Working in the Dark.
Secretary MacVeagh, at a dinner in
Washington, was urging the need of
scientific financial laws.
- “But let us make these laws scien
tifically," he said. “We must let in the
light. We must work in the light. If
1 we work in the dark, you know, we
will go wrong—like young Cornelius
, Husk.
“Cornelius Husk was called one win
! ter morning before dawn, and told to
| go and harness the mule to the dear
| born.
j “The lad was too lazy to light a lan
tern, and in the dark he didn’t notice
that one of the cows was in the stable
with the mule.
“As he tried to harness the cow his
father, impatient at the long delay,
shouted from the house:
“‘Corney! Corney! what ye doin'?’
“‘I can’t get the collar over the
mule’s head,’ the boy replied. ‘His
' ears are frozen.’ ’’
WHY NEIGHBORS FALL OUT
Here Are Some of the Remarks That
Often Start the Clothesline
Quarrels.
“Yes, I’m going to bring your lawn
' mower home tomorrow, sure. The
| blamed old rattletrap is no good, any
j way.”
“Ma wants to know if she can bor*
! row another cup o' sugar of you to
day? She’s keepin’ track of all of it.”
"I wish you’d keep your chickens in
I your own yard. This is the sixth
I time I’ve planted corn in my garden,
I and I’m getting sick of seeing your
I hens get it all.”
“Say, that kid of your wants to quit
his heaving rocks against my barn;
j or, by heavens, I’ll get after him good
i and plenty.”
“Why in thunder don't you keep
your dog at home? He’s chased our
cat upon the house three times this
morning. I’ll shoot the critter sure it
you don’t keep him tied up.”
“Your boy busted my boy’s coaster
last night, and I’ve come over to see
what you propose to do about it.”
“Can’t you put some kind of a
muzzle on that blamed old rooster you i
are harboring? He’s the pest of the
neighborhood. Nobody can get a de
cent night’s rest around here.”
“Yes, I ought to have sent your pa
per right back; but I’ll have Johnnie
bring it over in a few minutes, as
soon as I read the sports page.”—Los
Angeles Express.
CONSCIENCE OF THE SCOTCH
Tourists Who Wanted a Boat Ride
on Sunday Finally Overcame
Sandy’s Scruples.
A couple of tourists staying at a
! village which is in close proximity to
| a well known Scottish loch had a fancy
j one fine Sunday to go for a row on the
j loch. They accordingly sallied forth
in search of the boatman, whom they
; met just leaving his house dressed in
his Sunday best and carrying a Bible
under his arm.
“We want to go for a row,” said one
of the tourists.
“Dae ye no’ ken it’s the Sawbath?”
answered Sandy; “ye’ll no’ get a boat
frae me the day, forbye I’ll hae ye tae
ken that I am an elder o’ the kirk.”
“Yes, yes,” expostulated the tour
ists, “that’s all very well for you, but
we don’t require you with us. You
can go to church; we can row our
selves.”
“Ay, ay,” said the elder, “but jist
think whit the meenister’li say.”
“Never mind the minister,” was
the reply; “he will know nothing about
it. We will pay you well.”
“Ah, weel,” said Sandy, “I'll no’ let
ye the boat, bit I’ll tell ye whit i'll
dae. Dae ye see yon wee boatie doon
among the rushes? Weel, she’s ready
wi’ the oars inside. Jist ye gang
down there an’ row oot tae the middle
o’ the loch, an’ I’ll come doon tae the
| bank an’ swear at ye; bit never ye
| mind, ye jist row on an’ I’ll call for
the money Monday.”—ldeas.
Graceful East Indians.
Describing the women of India, a
writer says: “Even the most withered
toil-worn hag has a dignity of carriage
and a grace of motion that the west
ern woman might envy. The ‘sari’ is
draped in an easy flowing style and
adjusted as it slips back with a grace
ful turn of the silver bangled arm,
the skinny legs move rythmicallj', and
the small feet fall with a silent and
pantherlike tread. It is the beauty
of natural and untrammeled motion,
and says much in favor of the aboli
tion of the corset, for the Indian wo
men retain their uprightness and sup
pleness of figure till bowed with age.
“The commonest type is the coolie
woman, who undertakes all sorts ol
rough work, carrying heavy burdens
on her head, and she is, perhaps, the
least attractive, for her workaday
garments are usually faded and dirty;
yet, even among this poor class of
burden bearers, we see many with
handsome straight, features and supple
well proportioned figures.
“No matter how poor their gar
ments, jewelry of some sort is worn;
necklaces of gold or beads, colored
glass or silver bangles and heavy sil
ver anklets.”
Gray Leaved Plants.
Next to green, gray is the restfulest j
and most satisfactory color to be had
in foliage. We now have so many
hardy plants with gray foliage that we
can choose one for each month of
bloom and color of flower.
Among them are the silvery milfoil,
golddust, the white and purple rock
cress, the woolly leaved chickweed,
many hardy pinks, Siebold’s day lily,
Fischer's horned poppy, lavender cot
ton, woundwort and woolly thyme.
Some of these are decidedly silvery.
1 Others incline to a blue cast which is
' most pronounced in the globe thistles
and sea hollies. Such colors are so
unusual in nature that it is easy to
overdo them in gardens.—Country
Life in America.
Haste to Reimburse.
While carrying a ladder through
the crowded streets of Philadelphia
the other day a big Irishman was so
unfortunate as to break, a plate glass
j window in a shop. Immediately drop
t ping his ladder, the Celt broke iuto a
i run. But he had been seen by the
I shopkeeper, who dashed after him and
| caught him by the collar.
“See here!” angrily exclaimed the
shopkeeper when he had regained his
breath, “you have brokn my window!”
“Sure I have,” assented the Celt,
| “and didn't you see me running home
1 to get the money to pay for it?”
1 I
I
HAD NOTHING MORE TO SAY
How the Lady’s Complaints Were Si
lenced by the Fluent Dairy
Wagon Driver.
Fault-finding may be met in any one
of several ways. The method em
ployed by the dairymen of whom the
ltehoboth Herald tells would not serve
with some people; but apparently it
served with the lady at No. 75.
He had been told on starting out
on the route that No. 75 was inclined
to find fault, but that she was a good
customer, and he was on no account
to be rude to her.
“Those eggs you left here yester
day were stale!” grunted Mrs. 75, on
the dairyman's second visit.
“Those eggs.” responded the dairy
man, blandly, “was laid half an hour
before you had ’em, by special quick
laying birds imported from the Mooly
Yomps isles, ma'am, and they came
down to this very house by marconl
gram, so you should have 'em fresh.
A bit of twangy flavor they may have,
but you can rest assured, ma'am, they
weren’t stale.”
Mrs. 75 gasped.
, “Well, the milk didn’t seem as good
as usual yesterday, either,” she pur
sued.
“Well, the boss will be cut up when
he bears that!” continued the dairy
man. “He sent down to Alderney a
purpose for a cow that eats nothing
but peaches and pineapples. ‘Never
mind the expense,’ sezee. ‘This cow
we shall keep a-purpose for the lady
at 75, and mind it sleeps on a feath
er bed at night,’ he sez, ‘.and don’t
forget the eider-down quilt and the
bed socks.’ Was there anything
wrong with the butter, ma’am?”
But Mrs. 75 shook her head, speech
less. —Youth’s Companion.
MATERNITY IS A PRIVILEGE
Little Lecture on Marriage and Di
vorce That May Interest Some
Modern Parents.
“Some folks wonder at the miracles
1 in the Good Book, but God did the big
gest and most unexplainable thing
when he gave woman the privilege of
being a mother. You might marry an
-1 other man some time, but there’s
something you’d never forget, and that
’ is that Perk is the father of Lucille
and Mary Jane. It’s somethin’ that
demands from you a lot of forgive
ness, if-need be, for whatever he do
I don’t think there’s any divorce that
God’s a-goin’ to recognize which sepa
rathes fathers and mothers. He might
1 overlook their livin’ apart from each
other if things went too far cross
wise. but I doubt if he’s goin’ to fix
affairs up in heaven after the judg
ment day by sayin’ ‘Mr. Smith, the
courts down there in the U. S. A. says
you ain’t got no right to call this wom
an your wife and so I’m givin’ her
to Mr. Jones, who married her three
years after she got her decree. He'll
take care of your angel children and
you’ll have to go way back and sit
down.’ I say I don’t think he’s goin’
to do it that way.”—“Mary Jane’s Pa,”
in. the Novelization by. Norman Way.
Music as a Municipal Asset.
The deep wave of enthusiasm for
music is in the country; the crest ol
the wave is in the cities. Every me
tropolis—w r e have more than one—is
a mammoth conservatory. Six cities
support symphony orchestras of the
first rank. They are Chicago, St.
Louis, Cincinnati, Kansas City, St
Paul, and Minneapolis. A symphony
orchestra, be it known, is the ne plus
ultra of a music-center. To support
such a luxury is impossible save with
the help of many well-to-do John
Stones. It is also impossible without
a solid foundation of music-lovers —
enough to fill the hall nearly every
time. The city that has one has some
thing that its commercial association
can use with large effect in advertis
ing literature. For it has come to be
recognized in the west that musical
achievement is a municipal asset. The
“boosters” of a city now call atten
tion to its banks, its newspapers, its
wharves, its factories —and its sym
phony orchestra.—Metropolitan Mag
azine.
Tactful Request.
Dobbleigh was & confirmed borrow
er, and, what was worse, he seldom
) returned the borrowed articles. He
had held on to Whibley’s umbrella,
for instance, for nearly a year.
“And I’m blest if I know how I am
ever going to get it back,” said Whib
ley. ,
“Easy,” said Hickenlooper. “Call a
messenger and send Dobbleigh this
note.”
And he scribbled off the following;
“Dear Dobbleigh: If you can spare it
I’d like to borrow that umbrella of
; mine for a couple of days. Can you
i oblige me?” —Harper’s Weekly.
Out of Mouths of Babes.
Little Harold, aged five, helped his
! grandfather last summer setting out
fruit trees, and was telling his father
; about it the other night.
: Thinking to improve the oppor
tunity of pointing a moral, father
asked:
j “Who made the trees, son?”
The kid thought for a moment, then
I his face lit up with a knowing smile.
“1 guess God made the trees,” he
said. “But grandpa stood ’em up.”—
Milwaukee Free Press.
I |
D- ■’ ■’■'’oughts.
I ' . - i i ud. I see there
i
| when we
I
r | ALL AUTHORS ARE TALKATIVE
■ If You Know One, Be Tactful and Let
Him Converse About His
Work.
' I I know nothing about really great
authors, but 1 think I speak for a
' large number of the followers of the
1 trade when I say that they like to
■ | talk about their work, one great rea-
I son being that writing is a lonely pro
■ | fession. If you write, as a rule you
: must do it by yourself; or if you do
attempt it in company, you or the
i company will be sorry. Therefore,
when the writing is done, and a sym
pathetic listener offers, the writer is
glad to wipe out some of the lonely
hours with a little conversation.
So, if you know an author, don't be
; too breathless about, his calling; treat
him like a human being. I.et him talk
a little, and do not be shocked if he
manages to keep the tears back when
ihe tells you about his last short
j story. Only, be tactful,
i Do not say, as an eager acquaint
i ance once said to me: “Oh, I do think
it is so interesting to write. It must
! be just fascinating when your manu
j scripts come back!” I discovered af-
I terward that she meant proofs in
i stead of manuscripts, but the mistake
| of just that single word made me,
; who am usually so garrulous about
my trade, feel for the time being that
I really did not care ever to speak
; of it again. So I repeat, let the poor
author talk, but be tactful. —Atlantic
I Monthly.
: R. L. S. IN THE ADIRONDACK
Stevenson, Whiie Fighting Off Dis
ease There, Seemed Indifferent
to the Laws of Health.
; Robert I.ouis Stevenson, for so wise
a man, seems to have been singularly
unaware of, or indifferent to, the laws
of health, but that, too, may have
been part of his wisdom. He spent
the winter of ISS7 in the Adirondacks
struggling against the disease which
was not to subdue him for seven
years. He lived in a little cottage that
; was much overheated and from which
all ventilation was carefully excluded.
The smoke of his incessant cigarettes
’ obscured the atmosphere and perhaps
helped to drive away the visitors who
came to gaze upon him as one gazes
at a lion in a den. Fashionable call
ers were specially unwelcome and
Stevenson once remarked, according
to an account in the Medical Record,
that "it isn’t the great unwashed
which I dread, but the great washed.”
But whoever else was unwelcome
there was always a greeting for Rich
ard Mansfield. It is an impressive, al
most a tremendous picture, that of the
' | clouded room fitfully lit by the flames
j of the log fire and Stevenson huddled
' I close to the warmth while Mansfield
! at the other end of the rooom gave his
weird impersonation of Dr. Jekyll
and Mr. Hyde. It must have been like
God looking upon his handiwork and
finding it good.
King’s Watch in Pawn.
A time-honored London tavern, the
Castle, at the corner of Cowcross
street, facing Farringdon street, en
joys the unique distinction of being
also a fully-licensed pledge shop.
Over a door in the bar, which gives
i J access to the landlord’s private room,
i ! and thrown into bold relief by the
J official document behind it, the his
' toric three-sphered symbol is dis
j cernible. Anyone may here negotiate
| a loan upon his personal belongings
| without being under the necessity of
j first calling for refreshment.
This strange combination of busi
| ness dates lrom the reign of George
! IV., who, after attending a cock fight
at Hockley-in-the-Hole, applied to the
landlord of the castle for a temporary
accommodation on the security of his
watch and chain.
By royal warrant a few days later
he invested that obliging boniface
with the right of advancing money on
j pledges, and from that time down to
the present a pawnbroker’s license
has been annually granted to the
Castle. This hdstelry is mentioned
once or twice by Dickens.—Stray
Stories.
In Classic Boston.
Signs seen in Boston, according to
the Transcript: Placard at a moving
picture show: “Young children must
have parents.” In a barber shop win
dow: “During alterations patrons will
be shaved in the back.” Sign in a
Tremont street store: “Empty boxes —
suitable for Christmas gifts." In a
tailor's shop: “We dye for others, why
not let us dye for you?” In a cloth
ing store: “These pants will look bet
ter on your legs than on our hands.”
A silversmith has a place next door to
a restaurant. The former having put
up a placard: "Jewelry of all kinds
plated.” The restaurant keeper fol
lowed with this: “Oysters and little
neck clams plated.”
Dress for an Earthquake.
An old lady was staying at a hotel
at Nice at the time of the earthquake.
“My dear,” she was wont to say, “I
was simlpy tumbled out of bed and
the ceiling cracked. I threw on a fur
cloak and unconsciously pulled on one
long black suede glove, and when I
got down to the hall and found all
| the other guests —my dear, 1 was the
best dressed woman there!”
Not as Sad as He Feared.
“I will b" ••!" she
hissed.
’ "All right," be
afraid v:
> <>, <■
, Crude TT A Column
Thoughts HlllllP Dedicated
I An They lIVIUC to Tired
Fall Mothers
Krom the \jll CIC As They
Edi.oria) join the
Pleasant Depart- & e .
Evening . Evening
Revrries HUMlfi, Tide
You look at tile housewife who has s
place for all of her things, and thest
things in their proper places, and you
find a woman who is systematic in hei
work, and when she needs anything sh<
ran put her hands on it in a moment.
She plans and calculates whenever there
is to be extra work, extra cooking, extra
washing, etc., and she knows befori
hand just what there is to do, and whaj
she wants to do it with. And this sanisi
woman, who is so exact in her doings
gets more time to rest and read and ti
instruct her children in the paths of righl
and the social duties that they owe to all
Ladies, we hope that you are all ol till
class, receiving the blessings of your hit*
hand, and the praise of all who knoß
you. I
* *
I
As we stood in front of the postoffiefl
some time ago, we were forced to heH
a part of a conversation between twß
young ladies. They were talking a bog
a third party and christened her an ‘'oil
maid ” We came as near getting mafl
as an editor ever does. You know thfl
an editor never loses his temper. Ffl
si ill has it all. In almost every circle I
our kindred there has been some queH
of self sacrifice to whom a jeweled liatH
was ull'ercd in marriage, but who stayH
on the old place because of*the sense H
filial obligation until the health was goH
and the attractiveness of personal
encr had vanished. Brutal society
call such a one by a nickname. God
her a daughter, and heaven calls her^H
* * * HB
lie who loves beauty and is
for it will find it everywhere. And
niothn who keeps her enthusiasm
bv w uking with her children.
ing their perception of beauty and
lot the beautiful truths divine, will
them a blessed inheritance which
lighten their burden as they grow
her si-,, It,-ring care, and bring
• hopefulness, and yot^H
fulness into their lives.
BH
The habit of treating those who
and dearest to us with
••sy and distegatd, is on,- that clouds^H
sunshine ol too mam homes. HH
* * *
I’rohahlv nineteen-twentieth of
happiness that von util ever have
■a ill get at I mu -. The huh-pendenceHH
when Ins work is
•md he In I, ih it he has run out
into the quiet harbor ol'
u he!e In- rest in peace uithHH
something real It iloesHH
make niiii'li dilleretire whether H|H
own oi have little
m di.,i veil make that
* * *
Nothing so help- woman tki.mgHßn
long ill ;^B^S
she i i s ,|HH
au^^H
w in n: Think ol this luisi^HH
and 1.11 and i, uieinbei that ,iHh
wold is a!waxs in season. H9BH
'The old u email.' A nice phrHH|
w llo^^H
. HH
ihl id I loot! ai^HH
ni.ll;i< (I \■ -ted tio in m itHBB
have I^^H
■i^HH
scotching I I iw ail through the HH
■ I >b s - when^HH
nni”
can iMBS
whose el.. m , d \ on
iff I las met In i. lluoiigli
\eais la 1 watching and w^HjH
ii . on a aoHH
1" i;nlt el I1 ' \ u lie, 11: Ihe rosy
11-1 i I tel 111 more
wi^^H
aid ;e ei sp’-ak ,n i mother? HH
HH
is. ii.l ia nil ( 111 have good HHH
tin '-llee Is
ml Will .< .tnlioljsMHH
on^HH
Is dehcit^^HH
wHHH
it v. an codec and HHH
I" voiii much
tin- on^^HH
von In si the s^H|H
I liev do^^HH
ih -md giving sati,|,inonHHH
dH|
!■> -piling lln-m with rH|
lor the merited
ol kind, appiei i.itive words. HHmg|
ol peace
ionics lo
hoi n and
I • -li ein’. .i”i .nit Moss. iming |HH|
kind and deeds. |^^HH
* *
In main families the
i ol ev.-rvthing. sHHH
Inti tin- genteel
household. Tin-
' ' • a . and so <|iiirklv^|H|
tIIHH
- -v i', !by heavy burdH|H|
HH
lor vour H^Ha
If
. 1111.1 < .to you fl^H|
ni clviceHH[H
1 < .max. don’t botheiH^BH
-iirl'HH
'' -■ v ' otite to dieir mother H|HH
sir. --i\ •, i to youi lather, I BHHBffl
I s rile child will soon gt^HHH
• I leal "I In Ulg HHH
udl 111 apt to seek advi^^HH
l ! you lake
\el! they will
vou HHH
St John's to Ceiebra^HHH
- I ' i ; St. lohn's
tion I i oud are makHHH
iii’d-a ila duel tion
William i Kane, lor the
the - \ '-ni \-tntb .ii.iiii -ei sary ol tIHH
ol -si 11'ini’s Church on
I lie evf 111 expected to
in. die most pioiiiitu nt i I^Hh
la;'', in tile S'a'e -\: the
Be-I'op i i B. Corrigan, of RaltinHH|
1" nit ideate, uuli Katlier F. F.
Midi mil. Allegany county.
lade; 1 K. Duorv, of
deacon I he sermon will be
I'-dher Richard Tierney, of
College. At vespers Father
i'll'alter, recto! of the CathedrHHH
more, will preaeit, and Father
tor ot St. lohn's, will be masteHjJ|||
' monies. H^H
No. 23|

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