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The citizen. (Frederick City, Md.) 1895-1923, July 02, 1915, Image 2

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fSB OITIZHIf.
V'ol. 93
THE NEW .
PEARRR
DRUG STORE
No 18 SOUTH MARKET STREET
where you will find
everything a complete
Drug Store should have
BOTH PHONES. rjnly 24-tf.
[c. Hermann!
I & SON
( GROWER AND DEALER IN
ALL KINDS OF <|
| Plants & Cut Flowers |
DESIGN WORK, Etc. i
| 110-116 West South Street |
|> BOTH PHONES. i
| dflO.'iQ*!!,
COAL’ COAL!
All Coal Under Cover.
NO WATER, NO SNOW, NO DIRT,
EVERY POUND IN THE TON COAL,
ALL SIZES, ALL KINDS.
And only the best qualities coal, possible
prices. Give us a call.
Seasoned Wood taken m exchange for
Coal
We always pay the highest market
price for Hay and Straw either bailed or
loose. Get our prices before you sell.
J. M. NEWMAN & CO.,
22 East Patrick Street,
nov. 21 1902-tf Frederick, Md.
The chance to look over our UROCEKIKf
1 secutise Its the very best of Hb kind; because
I tel lipse any other within a radius of many
1 mile, and because Its your chance to catch
■on the lly” many a satisfactory purchase,
•o buy what you want,at the price you want
opay. means Huccess for you and also, for
! -i* because It Is likely to secure for ns your
hiture trade*
THE BEST ALWAYS
F. COLUMBUS KNOTT,
Huccesßor to Besant <£ Knott
Next to City Hotel.
oet. l.tt >(ki
FARM FOR SALE!
Farm for sale ol one hundred and fifty
"res, good neighborhood along pike, snita
| 'de for farming and dairying, good mend
i running water; eight miles from this
dy. Enquire at this Office, amt. 15t-f.
JjlOR HALE.
HOWARD COUNTY FARMS
1 all kinds. At prevailing prices cheapest
I uid in tlie world. If you menu business
"rite what you want in kind, location and
I'dce. LOUIS T. CLARK, Atty.,
urch 19 tf Ellicott City, Md.
rr s
I FOR SPRING BUSINESS il
Our Entire Stock of II
! j!
| Furniture,Rugs, Wall Paper, j;
j Etc. ||
t Is now open and ready for your inspec= j;
♦ tion. All the latest creations in new and \\
♦ attractive designs are now being shown, ;;
t Prices no higher than usual, in fact some j;
I things are lower. j;
| o. E. CLINE I
* >
J| , (Successor to M. L. Etchison.) J;
o o
WM. H. GRIFFIN, Manager. ij
O o
I; PASSENGER ELEVATOR. <|
< > o
Special attention give to Undertaking.
II Calls promptly answered day or night. j;
mch. 20’14-tf <;
♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦••♦••♦••♦•♦•••••♦•♦•••♦•♦l!
THE MODELj
11 ,
<>
n J;
II TELEPHONE No. 272.
o
m j;
\\ Renfrew Devonshire Cloth.
The only guaranteed cloth for the kiddies that posi- | [
|| tively will not fade. It has many imitations but you can <[
< j find the real goods her® 32 inches wide at 20 cents a yard. ||
See our window display for a sample line.
< > O
Fancy Top Sox. <1
The largest line of Fancy Top Sox we have ever car- ||
II ried. Our special number, made in U. S. A., is a winner <[
;; at 2 for 25 cents. Only a limited quantity left. II
II Silk Sweaters. ii
u n
II Their colors are Copenhagen, Gold, Green, Lavender, <j
I; Black, etc., $5.00 and $6.00 each. They are classy goods \\
and are just the weight you want for these cool evenings. ||
* They are also very dressy and can be worn with your best 11
IJ frocks. 11
II Men’s Neckwear. j;
• > 11
11 Something new almost every day—large line of famous ;;
11 Black and White Stripes, Polka Dots and the new pure silk J |
I’ Crepe de Chine ties for men. Only 50 cents each. ||
]| Somerset Soft Collars.
Two for 2£> cents. < >
< • o
I JOHN D. HENDRICKSON. ii
J! inn. 30, tf 1902
“There’s a Smile in Every Drop.”
LEVI PRICE PURE RYE
ASK FOR THE BOTTLE WITH THE GREEN STAMP ON
i
AMERICA’S BEST WHISKEY
dec 2’14 U
FREDERICK. MD., FRIDAY, JULY 2, 1915
Hail Does Damage.
A hail storm, covering a width of
two miles, from Pleasant Valley, Wash
ington county to Burkittsville in the
Middletown valley, was experienced
Saturday afternoon. At Brownsville
the hail fell so heavily that for a time
it could be shoveled.
Josephus Harley’s barn near Bruns
ittsville was struck by lightning, but
the fire was entinguished before any
great damage was done by the flames.
Wheat and corn on the farm of D.
V. Stauffer tenanted by Charles T.
Ahalt, was badly damaged. Crops on
the Duval farm, occupied by Richard
Everhart and the Shaffer farm, oc-'
cupied by Charles Hemp, were also
badly damaged.
On the Harley place there was not
much hail, but a severe storm was
felt. At its height a flash of lightning
struck the gable end of the barn, run
ning down to a shed and killing a
number of chickens.
The heroism of Miss Christine Har
ley, Mr'. Harlem’s young daughter,
who worked with the 'men on the
place, despite the fact that it was rain
ing heavily, to put out the fire, aided
in preventing serious damage.
Washington county farmers report a
heavy loss as a result of their corn
being damaged.
PROGRAM HERE ON MONDAY
Exercises To Be Held at Court and
Church Streets.
Monday beginning at 6 p. m., the
following program will be rendered
at Court and Church streets: Music,
by the band; address by E. J. Smith;
music, by the band, prayer by Rev.
U. S. G. Rupp; music by the band;
address, Attorney Leo Weinberg; ad
dress, Attorney H. D. Etchison; music,
by the band; “The Star Spangled Ban
ner,” a solo, by Prof. George E. Smith.
Mayor L. H. Fraley will notify Pres
ident Woodrow Wilson of this patrio
tic demonstration and will inform the
chief executive of the nation that the
people of this community are back of
him in any course that he may see fit
to pursue with regard to the rela
tionship between this country and the
nations of Europe.
Middletown Library Opens.
The Middletown Library was opened
Monday, with Miss Mary Eleanor Sha
fer as librarian, and Miss Elvah Sha
fer as assistant librarian. The library
is in the basement of the Methodist
Church, in a large and well equipped
room. The circulation for the first
day was fifty books.
*fcTThe Preferential Primaries,
which at the candidates for office
on both the Democratic and Re
publican tickets will be selected
this year, will be held in every
district and precinct in Frederick
county on Wednesday, the 15th
day of September.
REPORT OF THE CONDITION
OF
THE FREDERICK TRUST COMPANY.
At Frederick, in the State of Maryland, at
the close of business, May 1, 1915.
RESOURCES.
Loans and discounts $ 165,743.70
Overdrafts, secured and unse
cured 27.53
Stocks, bonds, securities, etc. 25,504.03
Banking bouse, furniture and
fixtures 20,073.39
Other real estate owned 38,276.67
Mortgages and judgments of
record 40,657.75
Due from National, State and
Private Banks and Bankers
and Trust Companies, other
than reserve 227.40
Checks and other cash items.. 1,255.76
Due from approved reserve
agents 10,008.45
Lawful money reserve in bank
viz:
U. S. currency and
National Bank
Notes $3,072.00
Gold coin 237.50
Silver coin 364.85
Nickels and cents.... 206.25 3,880.60
Total $ 305,655.28
LIABILITIES.
Capital stock paid iu $ 100,000.00
Surplus fund 25,000.00
Undivided profits, less ex
penses, interest and taxes
paid 2 228.38
Due to National, State and
Private Banks and Bankers
and Trust Companies, other
than reserve 5,029.41
Due to approved reserve
agents 172.16
Dividends unpaid 68.00
Deposits (demand)
subject to check.s72,Bs7 89
Trust deposits 10,988.73
Certified checks 900.00 84,746.62
Deposits (time) Savings and
Special 88,334.51
Contingent interest account... 76.20
Total $ 305,655.28
State of Maryland,
County of Frederick, ss.:
I, S. D. Hedges, Treasurer of the aliove
named Institution, do solemnly swear that
the above statement is true to the best of
my knowledge and belief.
8. D. HEDGES,
Treasurer.
( Subscribed and sworn to before me this
I 6th day of May, 1915.
1 CHAS. B. T. HENDRICKSON,
Notary Public.
Correct—Attest:
W. W. OSBURN,
■few RENO S. HARP,
FRANK L. STONER,
Directors.
Frederick Fourth Richest City in
State.
Frederick is the fourth in rank
among the weathiest cities in Mary
land. The assessed valuation of all
property subject to ad valorem taxa
tion in Frederick is $6,485,097. Fred
erick county is by the rule of thumb
the fourth weathiest county in the
state, if Baltimore city is excluded.
On the same principal Baltimore city
is tlie sixth in rank among the wealth
iest cities in the country and Mary
land ranks fifteenth in this report
among the states.
These significant facts are displayed
in a 200-page monograph issued Thurs
day morning by the United States Cen
sus Bureau covering the results of a
special investigation of the assessed
valuation of property and amounts and
rates of levy in the United States from
1860 to 1912. This monograph has
been prepared in connection with the
decennial investigation to present in
advance a part of the data to be in
cluded in the complete report of the
federal census of 1910 and to furnish
a convenient volume for reference for
the use of those interested especially
in the statistics of assessed valuations
and tax levies.
Tlie report shows that during the
10 years elapsing between 1902 and
1912 the per cent of increase in as
sessed valuation of all property in
Maryland was 68.7 per cent compared
with an average increase of 96.5 per
cent for the whole country, while the
per cent of the increase in assessed
valuation of real and personal pro
perty and improvements in Maryland
during the same 10-year period was
134.4 per cent compared with an aver
age increase of 96.3 per cent for the
entire country.
The only cities richer than Balti
more in this respect are New York,
Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago and
Cleveland in the order named.
The way in which the assessed val
uation of all property in Maryland
subject to ad valorem taxation has in
creased since the beginning of the
American Civil War is set forth as
follows;
1860 $297,135,238
*IB7O 339,067,934
**lß7o 432,834,918
1880 479,307,675
1890 529,494,777
1902 732,271,233
1912 1,232,457,607
♦Estimated on gold basis.
♦♦Estimated on silver basis.
The assessed valuation of all pro
perty subject to ad valorem taxation in
the principal cities and town of Mary
land in 1912 is set forth by Uncle
Sam’s investigators as being as fol
lows;
Baltimore $723,800,340
Annapolis 4,824,634
Cumberland 16,098,010
Frederick 6,485,097
Hagerstown 12,633,974
Brunswick 971,748
Cambridge 3,528,249
Chestertown 1,436,959
Crisfield 1,750,760
Easton 2,024,531
Frostburg 3,107,199
Havre de Grace 1,990,000
Salisbury 5,096,125
Westernport 1,002,753
Westminister 3,127,467
Another interesting section of the
report shows the assessed valuation of
property in every county in the United
States. This table deals with Mary
land and its counties as follows:
Allegany 39,141,553
Anne Arundel 21,352,952
Baltimore 159,044,403
Calvert 3,136,366
Caroline 11,304,124
Carroll 24,072,942
Cecil 15,865,940
Charles 5,927,317
Dorchester 14,002,372
Frederick 30,812,275
Garrett 11,871,110
Harford 19,915,376
Howard 11,179,964
Kent 10,618,106
Montgomery 20,844,083
Prince George 17,584,978
Queen Annes 10,688,223
St. Mary’s 5,051,326
Somerset i 8,088,229
Talbot 12,978,272
Washington 35,980,049
Wicomico 12,697,404
Worcester 9,599,903
Baltimore City 723,800,340
Total $1,235,457,607
Will Superintend Camp Meeting.
The Penn Grove Camp, near Han
over, Pa., which begins July 23 and
will continue until August 1, inclu
sive, will again be in charge of Rev.
E. H. Hummelbaugh, of this city, who
will act as superintendent of grounds,
a position which he has heretofore
filled with great acceptibility. During
the meeting a number of prominent
speakers will preach. On the first
Sunday Rev. E. H. Rupp, of Eastern
College, Manassas, Va., will deliver
the sermon. Other speakers who will
have a place on the program during
the meeting are Rev. Dr. F. T. Tagg,
of Baltimore; Rev. Bartlett A. Bow
ers, pastor of the First Baptist
church, this city, and Rev. G. W. Ev
ers, of Hagerstown.
Some idea of the size of Frederick
county’s crop of strawberries is given
by the announcement yesterday that
Walter Reeder, near Braddock, com
pleted picking 84 bushels of berries.
A general bumper crop for berries is
reported for the county this year.
The first peaches to be seen in
Frederick this season, raised on Fred
erick county soil, appeared on the
streets of the city yesterday. _____
Few Fireß Due to Crackers.
"Don't want the kiddies to have any
shooting crackers? Might burn some
body’s house down? Kids too are
less with fireworks?"
Well, if you fell that way about it,
alright, your are welcome to your
opinion. But, the report of State Fire
Marshal Myers for the year ending
May 3, 1915, which was made public
yesterday, puts a crimp in the now
almost ancient idea that the young
sters and their fireworks on the big
day of the year for the kiddies all
over the country, the, day on which
their highest patroitism is aroused,
the day on which their fathers in
years gone by could get out into the
streets, the lanes cud the back lots
and raise all the noise they wanted
to, the day when their grandfathers
formerly dragged the ancient cannon
up the old hill, or out into Silas Some
body’s meadow and, after loading her
to the muzzle, touch off the fuse and
send out such a bang! that the whole
countryside heard it and jest natur
ally tossed their hats into the air for
joy—are the cause of the great fire
damage which thereotically is attri
buted to them.
The report that of the 2,093 fires
occurring in Maryland during the .
year, only nine—get that nine, Mr.
Critic—were caused by flVeworks,
while something like 100 times that
many blazes were attributable to the
carelesssness of the kiddies’ fathers
and mothers, in not properly looking
after their stoves, the flues and
causes of fires which could have been
prevented. In Frederick county there
was not a single fire of the 71 which
occurred during the year, attributed
to fireworks.
With the exception of 53 blazes the
origin of which cannot be traced, fires
in Frederick county, with their causes,
were as follows: Adjoining building,
3; burning rubbish, 1; defective flue,
2; defective wiring, 1; defective stove
and pipe, 3; gasoline explosion, 1;
lightning, 6: wind tornado, 1.
Of these all over the State 94 started
in adjoining building. Burning rub
bish caused 30, matches in the hands
of children,44; coal from stoves, 34;*
defective flues, 121; defective wiring,
16; defective stoves and pipes, 36;
fireworks, 9; gas explosion,l2; gas
jets, 62; gas stoves, 24; gasoline ex
plosions, 17; grease and lard over
boiling, 14; lightning, 155; lamps and
lanters, 23; careless handling of mat
ches, 62- oil explosions, 13; overheat
ed stoves, 82; overheated stovcspipes,
28; carelessness of smokers, 42;
sparks, 32; spontaneous combustion,
20; thawing pipes, 9 matcehs ignited
by mice and rats, 12; oil stoves,34;
candles, 29. and tornadoes,l6.
The belief prevalent during the Win
ter and spring that incendiaries were
working in Frederick county, is
strengthened by the figures given in
the report of Marshal Myers showing
it has impossible to learn the origin
of 53 blazes. The report shows that
Frederick county had the largest num
ber of fires of any county in the state
during the year, with the exception of
Baltimore county, where there was
137 blazes. Alleganey county had 70,
Carroll 22. Montgomery 28, Washing
ton 57, Howard 36.
The total amount of insurance paid
for fire damage in Frederick county
was $35,044.59. The insurance on the
destroyed property amounted to $Bl,-
694.47. Total losses paid in Mary
land amounted to $1,160,449.69.
Will Out Tax Basis.
A big slice will be cut from the tax
basis of Frederick county according
to estimates received from the offices
of the county commissioners yester
day evening. It is estimated that'this
cut will be almost $2,000,000 which is
due entirely to the furniture ’exemp
tion act and the cut from bank stock
assessment. Clerk Harman L. Gaver,
who has been working from early in
the morning until late at night on the
levy and basis predicted last evening
that the basis for the coming year
would be in the neighborhood of $400,-
000 less than $30,000,000. The basis
for 1914 wa§ $31,289, 725.
In spite of the fact that the basis
will be materially cut the county com
missioners still hope to cut the rate
to $1 on the SIOO. The rate for 1914
was sl.lO. It was estimated yester
day that the rate would be in the
neighborhood of the dollar mark for
1915.
The county commissioners will
meet today make the levy and fix the
tax rate for the county for the com
ing year. There is a likelihood that
the commissioners will go into ses
sion at about 11 o’clock. The indica
tions are that the meeting will be a
lengthy one. The board has taken
no action on the amount that is to be
appropriated for the operation of
schools of the county for the coming
year.
The county commissioners have in
many instances saved large sums of
money over like appropriations made
last year for the same work. At the
same time however it will be neces
sary for the commissioners to in
increase the appropriations for some
items.
For the past several months at in
tervals Clerk Gaver has begun wark
at his office as early at 6.30 o’clock.
; For weeks he has been working as
■ late as 9 and 10 o’clock.
The commissioners will open, bids
i on Saturday for supplies at Montevue
for the next quarter.
Bids for the construction of the
Brunswick-Petersvillo State aid road
i will also be opened on Saturday by
the county commissioners. •
No. 41

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