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The Prince George's enquirer and southern Maryland advertiser. (Upper Marlborough, Md.) 1882-1925, April 15, 1887, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89060124/1887-04-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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JOSEPH K. ROBERTS, ) p
FRED. SASSCER, Jr., J
Vol. 5.
THE
%xmt ffnpim
IS PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY
AT UPPER MAULHOROI GH, Ml
TER MS PE R v EA R:
II Paid in Advane*
If not Fold in Advance *••••** ’.A 1
To and Teneliera at half-price.
Advertisements conspicuously inserted attne rate
of une Dollar jcr square for the first insertion, ami
Fifty Cents for each subsequent insertion. Elgin
lines (or its equivalent in space) constitute a square
A fraction ot a square, when it exceeds a halt, win
be counted as a wh-‘!e square—all unuer will be
rated as a half. fcT Liberal arrangements will be
ruade with those who w ish to .‘.veit>e by t lie >ear .
but those who advertise by the year, must coniine
I heir advertisements to liner own business. mwA.\ i
letters, communications, \v.. should be addressed to j
the undersigned.
ROBERTS A SASSCEU,
Kioto its,
I'p}ier Marlborough.
Profession al Ca rds.
Dr. Norman B. Scott,
HAVING determined to locate in tlii
Town oilers ins professional servicer to
the public. He can be found al tbc ollic; ol
Ins father Dr. Richanl J. Scott, when not
professionally engaged.
October B—ly.
■ *. MAORI HER. 408. S. YVII.SOX.
Magnifier & Wilson,
Attorney s-at-Law ,
OFKK E' t
Upper Marlboro’, P, G. Co., Md.
Rjom No, 3, Gunton Law Building, Louisiana
Ave., near 6th St,, Washington, D, C.
WII.L practice in the Courts of \\ oslihlg
tou City, Prince (ieorse’s anil adjoining
counties of Marvin"! and J>n the Maryland
Court of Appeals.
Will lie in Washington City oflice on I inlay
*nd Saturday of each w cck.
March 2, ißß7—if.
JOSEPH K. ROBERTS. WII.I.IAM STAM.Et
Uobcrlw A .Stanley,
a ttornevs at Law,
I CTF.R MAR 1,80 30', MD.
HAVING associate*! themselves in the
practice of law, otler their prolessional
services to the public.
Tl**v will practice in the Courts of Prime
Gemge’s and the adjoining counties and the
Court of Appeals.
attention given to business.
Jan B—lßßC —ly,
R. B* B. CHEW, Jr,
Attorney-at-Law ,
Upper Mari.boro*, P. G. Co.,Md.,
WILL practice in the Courts of Prince
George's and tlie adjoining counties,
and promptly attend to all business entrusted
to hiii*. , ~ ,
AU; roprvnieiitiiig W. T. ShackelforJ, gen
eral l**4irance Agent, Jiuliiniorc.
Jan. Ist ISSO—ly.
~f§M. SASSCER, Jr.,
Attorney and Counsellor at taw.
U Pl‘ Elt MAIt L It Oli O', MO.
I
R. B. B. CHEW,
A 11 o ney at Law,
Upper Marlboro ’, G. Co., Md.:
WILL practice in tic’ Courts of Princ
George's anil tlie adjoining countie,
and the Court of Appeals.
December 23,1881 —ly
RICHARD E. BRANDT.
Attorney at Law
UPPER MARLBORO’,
Pbixce George's County, Mi>.,
WILL practice in tlie Courts of Prince
George's and adjoining counties. Par
ticular attention given to the collection ot
claims, etc. [July 22. 1881 ly
FILLMORE BEALL,
Attorney at Law,
Chonncey Building, No. 31 42 St.,
WASHINGTON. D. C.:
WILL practice in the Courts of Prince
George's and the adjoining counties.—
Letters addressed to Beltsville will rcce.ve
prompt attention.
January 3, 187b —lv
DANIEL R. MAGRUDER,
(late of the Court of Appeal*,)
Attorney-at-Law,-
pni ye e Fit Eh Eli I<' K,
CALVEKT CUP STY, MAHYLAM*,
Will practice in the Court of Appeals and
ill the Courts of St. Mary’s, Calvert, Auue
Arundel, Prince George’s and Charles Conn
ies. Office and address, Annapolis, Md.
Marcli 30, 1883— tf
C. H. STANLEY,
Attorney at Law,
No. 8 Court land Street,
(near Lexington.)
BALTIMORE, Md.:
W1 L L practice ic the Courts of Prince
George's and the adjoining counties.—
L Iters addressed to him at Laurel will receive
prompt attention.
February 10, 1871—tf
William I. Hill,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Upper Marlborough:
HAYING resumed the practice of Law in Up
per Marlborongh, will promptly attend to
any businessentrusted to his care.
Upper Marlboro’ Juoe 30, 1805 —tf
W. J. LATIMER.
SURV K V O I
Upper Marlborcush.
Prince George's County, Mary 'a id.
HI ■■■ A STOPPED FREE
■ H Mirxtioui
I ■ Inss'-e Heisom restored
■ B 3 EjJDr,KLINE 3 GREAT
■ ■ vs/ NeRVERESTQ9ER
.7 Hr UN .V N'-RV A*. TtSFA<E> ■ vSure
H Inf
r - -
■■
9§rn Drugs >
.Vlont‘% lo Loin.
ON REAL I .ST .VI e. ..N PRINCE ( eo j.-N
.oil'llv, in ‘■uni 11, suit, at six p r cent, i
l ' JEKiS -V 81 AM.I- V,
-1 1 f ornuy* n / ■* nr . j
Jfi.n|b 1 1- <■' • i’l" I Mailin' fj . Md. j
She Tlrinrr tfii'orijCs LmiuirtT,
Com in issi on Merch ants.
M. 11. MOORE. J- F. MUDD.
Wm. H. Moore & Co.,
GROCERS
AND
toininissiou .ftlridmnts
105 Smitii Charles St.,
11 YI I I MORE. Ml'.
! Particular attention given to inspection and
sale of T< UIACCO. the sale of Grain and all
kinds of Country Produce.
Dec 25, IS?*'— lv*
Louis F. Detrick & Son,
Commission lerclianls
FOR THE SALE OF
Leaf Tobacco, Grain,
AND
OTHER COUNTRY PRODUCE.
108 5. Charles Street,
BALTIMORE.
Mr. li. O. Mullikin will have charge of
all Tobacco consigned to me.
(rr’Conslgnments Solicited, and
Liberal Advances Made.
Jan. IS, ISS7—ly.
.IXO. 1!. HUDGINS & CO.,
fljDimnissunt Dltwliants,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IX
HAY, IVII Xj Zj-FEBD,
Corn Meal, Crain. Straw. Swtls.
Cor Pralt SI & !WcEldfrpj ,
Wharf*,
BALTIMORE, Md.
Oct 2, 18H*—Gin.
K. C. PRKSSTM AN, J *>UN SroKKS
J. 11. DORSETT
with
PItESSTMAN & STOKES.
GGIERAL
Com miss ion • Her eh /tuts,
TOBACCO, GRAIN, FRCIT,
and WOOL,
10G S. Charles St..
Ball! more, 11 d
Seeds and Fertilizers Always on Hand.
fefeiTencks.
National I nioii l>a.)k of Maryland; Arm
strong, Cator *& Co; John A. IHisliaue *& C
Jan. 10, lSt>o—ly
Thomas C. Price & Co.
GEJ\- 'ERAL
Commission Merchants,
FOR SALE OF
TOBACCO; GRAIN, WOOL,
AND ALL COUNTRY PRODUCE.
110 S. Charles St. Baltimore.
LEO 11. HAY'DEN, formerly Tobacco In
spector, gives Ids personal attention
to this Blanch.
[£7—Consignments S dicited. (J lick -Sales and
Proni] t Returns.
TAKE NOTICE ’
Fertilizers Reduced in Prices to Suit the Times
Quality kept up to full Siandard.
VICTOR for Tobacco Cash 537 00 jeu ton
WAVERLV for Wheat ,V
Corn " 3*l o** per 'on
Dissolved AiniininialeU
Bone and I’o'ash “ 30 00 per ton
Wheat and Corn Fertmzrr “ 25 03 per ton
[lT’Acci p'ed D.'afts at 3*> to i!*J Days consi
dered Cash.
To Responsible and Prompt Paying Custo
meis—on Crop Time without interest.
Victor S4O per ton
Waverly 3.7 •• “
j Dissolved Aiiinioinaled Bone and
Potash 3.7 •* “
Wheat and Corn Kelts I z -r. 3*f “ ••
FOR TOBACCO BUY HIE MCG'oR.
It has stood the lest of ten years’ trial and
lias the deserve.’ repiitauiiii of in iking the lin
est ipiality ami as much T’obacg >as aay Fe .-
tilizer in ilie maikei. it dues not (ire, but
keeps the Tobacco growing until ripe, curing
nicely. A special T .bac.'o and Wliear Fer
tilizer, good for all crops.
The WAY’ERI.Y' s|H*cialiy for Wheat and
j Corn. The Dissolved Aiiiiiinni tted Bum and
I Potash, and the Wheat and Cum Fertilize - ,
j lutve ail pruveil t eirvilne f>r these and all
j cru|.
i <inr Feilil /is a e neli in erup-producing
I elements in ilie must peifocl eumbinalion, and
I we confidently offer*hen. to Farmers for good
I crops, tine clover fields ami immanent im
i proveiiu nt i f their lan N. Try them.
| Orders Jsolii bed.
| April 8 ly.
NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK.
TERMS:
$2, $2.0 0 and $d /ter Day.
For persoLb tniveiinu upon Im.slnew or
pleasure, with families, alone. *r with parties of
tourist-*, the PK.\PHT PtKk HOIS t In
THE BESJ HOTEL IT XTUIAKA FALLS-
S. R PORTER,
June 27—tl. .Manaoek and Ci.kkk.
KNABE
PIANOFORTES.
UNEQUALLED IX
TONE, TOUCH, WORKMANSHIP
and DURABILITY.
WILLIAM KTVAIt 13 <fc CO.,
Kos. 204 and 200 VYestE.dtimoreHf., Ktlumor.,
Sc. IX2 f ifth Avenue, New York.
vac Blanks and Haiylf
of all kinds printed at thin
i office at tow rates.
i
AND SOUTHERN MARYLAND ADVERTISER.
UPPER MARLBOROUGH, MU., FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 1887.
j Lanshurg £ Bro’s Column.
; A FORTUNATE
OCCURRENCE
FOB
US ALL
You Can Now Buy Staple
and Seasonable Goods
at Half Their Value.
Read Carefully Each Item.
V
We bought from the stuck of the
well-known Manhattan Importing and
Manufacturing Company, of 40 White
street, New York, who lately failed in
business, at a price that enables us to
pffer you good reliable merchandise at
less than one-half of what we could
buy the goods for regularly. It was of
course a cash transaction.
Now wishing to realize our money
out of this as soon as jiossible and to
make as big a noise as ever was occasion
ed in commercial centres,
WE WILL SELL;
3.71 i dozen Ladies' Linen Ca;ie Collar- at 0 ■
These \ou loiully pay tip. fur.
S6O dozen Ladies' While Chrumetl S. all
sizes. li'p - . Guilds never suM by am body
less Ih l'l 2.7.*.
12,*XHi jMirs Suspenders, In white or cu o s,
at 17c. choice Gi od- among these worth fiom
2.7 c. to 4ifc.
Lidies Fancy lri|ie Hose, llje; worth
20c.
2* 0 dozen Ch Idren's Solid Color. <1 Hose.
19c. per pair.
M)0 dozen Children's Solid Colored Ribbed
Hose, sc. pel pair; 3 pair for 25c.
250 dozen Ladies' S did Colored Full R gn
kirM.de Hose, 25-'. per pair; usually sold
for 37 Jc.
15.000 yards Maline Wiling f.r 3 ; a veil.
This is all-silk V. I ling and in eveiy conceiv
able and desirable shade.
20.000 yards Check Nainsook at Bc. Goods
usually retailed at 12p - .
.7,000 pairs Ladle,’ Lisle Thread Gloves, all
sizes, 12?.c. per pair; usually sold at 2,7e.
2.000 dozen Ladies’ Colored Bordered Hem
stitched Handkerchief-, oe. each.
2.7.000 yards White Lawn at ,7c. per yard.
Every yard perfect : every yard well bleached ;
worth Bc. the world over.
50 000 yards Fine Sal I-tens at 12?,;. Sold
eveiy where for 2.70. Fhose goods are even
far superior to tlie goods we made such a fil
mic wirh a week ago. Surpassing in beauty
and design any French guo Is yet shown.
tor OUT OF TOWN PATRONS
NOTICE. — We are compelled to ig
nore requests f<>r samples for the above
two items unless a two-cent stamp ac
companies such requests. The very
small margin on these materials at the
prices named makes this imperative.
No restriction as to quantity sold.—
Wo bought these goods to sell and do
pot w ish to dictate to you what quanti
ty to buy.
We have stacks of each article enu
merated and are anxious to dispose of
all. Tell everybody of this great sale.
m ME TO TEE VOID !
j
I
*
f
.
LANSBORG & BRO
SEVENTH ST.,
WASHINGTON. DC.
f
April 1, I^7—ly.
Mi seel lane on v. hlr't/scvi cuts
Tfl |
BULL S CULUH SYRUP over
all otl'.errough remedies is attested
By rite immense popular demand
for that old established remedy.
For the Cure of Coughs, Colds,
Hoarseness, Croup, Asthma, Bron
chitis, Whooping Cough, Incipient
Consumption and for tlie rebut of
consumptive persons in advanced
stages of the Disease. For Sale
by all Druggists.—Price, 25 cents.
September I l *, ISPd—ly.
CHARLES McKAE,
IVliolcsali 1 and Retail
LIQUOR DEALER
Mo. 11l ..V. Calvert Street.
NEAR THE DKrOT,
B tl/l i >1 Oil it. >ll>
Best S1 Whisky in the City.
TRY IT !
Oct. 2. ISS.7—ly.
The lx st Liver 11 - xl pi 'Jicr k’iowi . In
use forever 100 year?. It cures ;• 11 rii.-t .isesorijri
nating from a ilisor lerod Lv* rural iiriure bloid;
such as Bilious Attacks. Malaria. Dj*i • psia. Diz
zinesa, Sick-heatiuuhe. i oustipation, t * Ids. Scrof
ula. Erysipelas, iioils, J’imples, and Female
Complaints. Belli* pleasant to take.it Uan ex
cellent remedy for child rt t. rricv.flJ • per bottle,
•Ample bottle cents. Wt* nl-o mninitaciure the
followiu* Victor K*;:nedi* Vi t<*r Coiufh Svrup.
Victor Infant's Rilu-f, Victor l ain Balm. \ ictor
Liver Pills anti Victor l.inim* nt. j very Dottle is
Karantevd to give ierfect suti-hiuL: n. Try one
ttle anil !e *n\ in*■ C Ur - . . • mt Lottie.
VICTOR K Mill UN O.. Prop's.
! Feb. 1 1. i>—l..
GEKl!iit f^ERIT
S 3 SURE TO WIN.
VTe believe ih Ul KIIEUM ATISn
Cl UK !ia- tv.-r. *v:u.ip* merit. It i' this faith
vhsch has le<l to ] ito it s<>
liberally. We have put more into it than money
—money couUi not buy the tair imme we have
pained by iwt ity years of li * ■ business
dealing rfghl hr re < Market >u, I’i ' ph a,
and yet so great is our ailh in th Kn-sinu Hheti
mali’sm t'ure t ’mi \vc a•• \\.. I:t._r t• >:..ke .:r rc
rmtul ion on it
fart t-rail Khcuu a lie troubles. t'n.:!d we oIUt
Any '
si.lV. (mrAclve-. l av* l 1 its i.u ril- and U‘M
tlieir hearts an 1 um qni I ■ ndui • u •■r.i
Wo spud toali wh * a-k . ( amphlet contaiu-
In* much of s'ldt iO'tiir. *i:y. And yet if you
have lilieumalism why sitfler one day longer
than i> necessary. !t e -u *-n.> -J 50b * becured,
and while y*m a;* m :: i: _ up your liliud lo try
it vu might b * made well. The
RUSSiAN
RHEUMATSSrVI
CURE
has saved every Rheumatic / tfferer who hr.s
given it a fair trial. It is fur you t*> decide
whether *r not it shall euro , Mi,
r • _ „ pri ca * If inn lied I dc. additional
PriCO
| SSI A N**
1 U—, RHEUMATISM CUReJ
/ a vet it is not to le found at the stores, but can
roly l* luul byem losin* the ammut u> aboYr.au*!
tdmvssiurf the American pMprieton*.
PFAELXER BROS. & QOk
81D-H2I Market Street, l'!;iladetoUla.
April 2, 1883— ly.
GOTT6CHALK & CO..
IMPORTERS AND DISTILLERS
AX I>
CURERS OF FINE
WHISKIES,
46 & 48 6 & S
LIGHT ST. BALDERSTOPJ SI
BA.3_> r 4VIJD.
Dec. 25, 18S5—ly.
OI K iiaiyiii.i;v
Mark Down Sale
is nowin full operation, such ai
opportunity to get strictly lirsi
class CLOTHING for Men, Hoy
ami Children at such incrediDD
loyv figures has not occurred ii
15 years. Kveivtliing must h*
sohi,cost Yviiat it mav. Dun t <lc
lay as guuds arc la-ing cugcrlj
! purchased hvcroYvds of shrcYVt
j buyers. For th - 'greatest bargain:
! of our tinu s vi.-it or Yvritc to
I j
Acme Hall.
17 r Kidliiti >rr Mm‘l,
Xr. A \ ; Mill R. )
S. ... Chat ie-.
im/IPRIKI.
Jan. 21. IS>7 i.
i
s ‘ fUictvn
WHEN THE CHICKENS GOME HOME TO
ROOST,
Van rnnj t.il,i - tin, w,*rl,l a- it roiim. a.iJ tine-.
A ini' yon will '.c Ante to 1
riial late will .-.|'rire the ae • .inn'- -he o ves. ,
YVhoevor lieliiiul
An< I all Cling- tli.it a man hi-.I me.
Ily what.-oever .ii.l'iecl.
Return at last t. liim.mie by one.
As the .!i . ,-c .. in;- Inline to r.n.st.
You may stripe and toil and pitch an I >\ •,
While your hoarded wraith expands.
Till the cold, dark >ha low of the grave (
>° ,,r 1 ; !
N on will liaxc yom b.alan *e struck. sn ‘ night
And you'd fuel ymir h >trd re.laead.
Von”! view your life in sriotner light.
When the ehh ken- eoine home t Mtd.
'
Y'eu <■ ■" -*:"• >■>•" -<> J ":>•* -* irve vnir heart |
With the lin-l:- ~1 .i I, me" ei .'C I.
Rut f hrist will know ii you p ay a part.
Will know in your hour of nee I ;
And then as yon wait for death to come
What ho|*e can theie l** reduce I
From a uroed alone V yon will lie there dumb.
While flic ehieken.** come home to rout.
Saw as you will : there's tim.? to reap.
For tlie good and had ;u well, <
Ar.d eon.sciem e, whether we w.iko or sleep.
I-either a heaven or hell. > \
And every wrong will find its place. {
And every passion loose*l.
Drift.-back and meets you fate to lace—
When tlie chickens com • h *:p? to r.ost. ! {
Whet her you're over or nnler the sod. I j
The result will be the same ;
You cannot esjape t!e hand of iod.
You must bear your >iu or sham *.
No matter what’s carved uu a marble si il..
When the items all aio proiluga I
Von'il fn.d tliat St. Peter was kC3ping 41 fah.”
Anl that chickens come homo to roost.
Select Hliscdlnnn.
Will Lore.
Tin* .'iilijcct of will- lias a in-culiar
’intoivst for laYwers, parlicnlarlv where |
a considerable e-tate is devised. r l hey j
are ii.■! onlv uiirimis to knoYV hew a
man wishes his property to go after hej
is through Yvith life, but it seems like a
voice from the dead declaring lioyv it
shall go. I: is usually written in the
most solemn moment of a man's life.—
At that moment one realizes to the full
that hebronirht nothing into this Yvorhl
and
aftei
heai
spol
ciai
lin
ger
. Mr.
dbp
Off:
not
or a
published in Hie morning papers,
read tie in first, a- the most toothsome
items of lieu s.
■ The clause in Mr. Tildcn'- will pro
viding that if anv one of the diviseesj
#ronti -t ii In- shall forfeit his share is a
v alid one, and may be often found in |
the w ills of astute persons, like the de
parted statesman, it has a tendency to
induce caution on the part of the heirs. |
If one can lose nothing by a contest j
and mav gain something, he may rush i
into court as a sort of speculation, and j
in that Yvay much of the estate he lost. !
Our Uncle Sammy knew enough about
law and lawyers to w ish to keep his es
tate free from their care. As nobody |
over drove a coach and four through any i
1 document or statue lie w rote, so you
may he sure his w ill, drawn by his own .
' hand, is equally ironclad.
'There are many very curious and ec- |
j centric wills dcscrilied in the books.
? , and some strange phrases of human (
nature arc illustrated in them. Some!
men, who in life Yvould not have given
a cup of w ater to a beggar, by their j
will- leave enormous sums to charity*
Those are the wills that usually take a
course through tin* courts, wiih hand
some pickings for the lawyers on the
Yvav. All charitable bequests are con-1
j, structed with the utmost strictness.
About ten years ago 11. 11. Taylor, of
Chicago, died, leaving a w ill draw n By
himself. After providing for his wile!
- : and son, as thought quite liberally, he j
devised the residue of his estate, about'
85011,000, to seven trustees to found a
charitable institution such as they;
should deem best. 1 u case they elected
not to do so the trustees were to turn j
over tlie estate to the Home of the!
11 Friendless. As a matter of course the;
will was contested, and, after thorough
s legal inquiry.it was found that the:
} charitable clause would not hold w ater. I
11 After considerable litigation the ease
'0 yvus compromised, and tin* Home of the
Friend!. -- got s'Jßujhmi and the heirs
V the remainder.
*4 A man in New Jersey not long since,
18 left’ his estate to payoff the national
debt. Th ■ will was contested, of course,
hut tin* courts have recently held it va
lid. lu the last c muiY Sii Joseph
•lekyll did the same thing in England.
W hen Lord Mansfield heard <>f il he
said: "Sir.loscph was a very good man
and a good lawyer, hut his bequest was
a yv.iy foolish mie: he might :e well
have attempt'* 1 to slop the middle arch
of Uhtckfriar- Bridge with his full-bot
tomed y\ ig."
Simple a mallei* a- ii reallv is. htw-
vers have not always been successful in
drawing their own wills. Lord St. Le
onard. high chancellor of England who.
as Edward Sngden. who was the most
eminent chancery lawer in England,
and who with a number of law boohs,
one particularly with a very elaborate
chapter on drawing wills, drew his own
will, and it rcquriod an expensive law
suit and the decision of a court of chan
cery to give it proper effect. The will
of Lord West bury, another lord high
chancellor, drawn by himself, mot with
the same fate. I could give you manv
similar instances.
There have been devises to animals
or for their benefit, which have been
held valid to cats, dogs, horses, and
even parrots. Not infrequently people
have undersaken to show their spite
and hatred, and sometimes their humor,
in wills.
The will of Lord Pembroke in the
seventeenth century has several items
of that kind —for instance: "Item—l
give nothing to my Lord Save, and J
do make him this legacy willingly be
cause 1 know that he will faithfully
distribute it unto the poor. Item—l
give up the ghost."
Lord Bacon had no property to leave,
but he left a regularly executed will, in
which lie bequeathed his name and
memory "to men's charitable speeches,
to foreign nations, and the next ages."
Shakespeare left an elaborate will,
which contains a clause that has puz
zled the Shakespearean- not a little.
"I give unto my wife my second best
bed, with The furniture." Why did he
only give Ann Hathaway his second
best, and not his best bed? Nothing
else did she get, and the will has sought
in vain to know the reason why.
Lord Nelson left a will drawn just
before he went into the battle of Tra
falgar, by which he bequathed Lady
Hamilton and her daughter to his
king and country, but neither king nor
country accepted the legacy, and they
both came to want. Lady Hamilton dy
in abject poverty.
apoleon in his will left a handsome
icy to a wretch named Chatillon,
i had attempted to assassinate Wel
don.
he will of Rabelais lias this clause:
uive no available property; 1 owe a
t deal; the rest I give to the
His last words when dying
■: ‘T go to see the great Perhaps."
imous French abbe had this pithy
se in his will: “To my steward 1
nothing, because he has been in
my service for eighteen years."
It is not unusual for a husband to
leave all his property to his wife, with
! the proviso that if she marries again
| she is to have only what the law allows
| her. I have drawn a number of such
wills. Gov. -Morris, the celebrated
| American statesman, did not treat his
wifs so. He had married v ery late in
life Ann Randolph, a cousin of John,
lot* Roanoke,a woman much younger
j than himself, and with whom he lived
■ very happily. He bequeathed a very
handsome income to her. and then pro
vided that in case she married again
the income should be doubled.
.V soldier or a sailor is allowed to
make a uoncupative will —that i-. a
will by word of mouth, by which per
! sonal estate may be disposed of, but
i you, being a civilian, must make yours
in writing. It don't matter much
(what the writing is <>u it may be on a
I slate, or a table top, or even a wall,
though it is adv isable that it should
be on paper or parchment. You may
write it and sign your name in pencil
if vou like but it is better to do it in
ink.
Von may make your will in ( boc
; taw, if you happen to understand that
language, or it may. as Hamlet says.
•be writ in choicest:" you may write
! it in shorthand, or in abbreviations, or
in cipher, so long as yon leave the key
! behind you. Courts are not martinets
las to spelling, and if your orthography
is not perfectly ultra, they will not
' mind if they cannot make it out. If
you wish to drop into poetry, even that
; is permitted, as in the following case
! of a valid will shows ;
I give and bequeath,
When I'm laid underneath,
To my two loving sisters in >sl ds e-.
The hole ■f my store,
\\’ere it twice as inueh more.
Which (Jod's goodness has granted 'o me.
And ilial none may prevent
This my will and intent,
(>r ixv.vdon the le.i,st of law racket.
With a solemn appeal.
1 couth m. sign and se it,
This, the tme act ami deed of Will da ket.
Vou may sign your will bv vour in
iljials. and Jif your bamt is unsteady
ymi may get some otic to guide it.
Vou miyst have at least two witnesses,
and though you may not actually sec
the witnesses sign their names you
must be in such a position that you
could do so if von "felt so disposed." as
Mrs. Gamp might remark. T hat was
Judge Rogers’ ruling in the Stotvv
w ilt case, and it is good law.
If von are going to leave anything to
SUCCESSOR TO ) ESTABLISHED
■the tbtxce (teorgiax.” j a. d. isgi.
line don't ask me to he a witness, for
although 1 could he a good witness, my
I legacy would he void. John Homier
| was an eminent Envy i* in Philadel
j ]diia some years ago, and the author of
| several standard law hooks. A lady
! left him a very handsome bequest in
her will, which he himself drew and
w itnessed. There yvus no doubt about
the intention of the lady. But Hom ier
failed to get his legacy.
Having signed and settled your
will, you can revoke it by destroying
it. but not By simply running the pen
through your name or through the
lines, hut yon can revoke it by a sub
sequent w ill properly executed. Mar
riage also revokes a w ill.
Moses
It is said in the Hook of Numbers
that “Moses was very meek above all
the men which were upon the face of
the earth." Now. w riters of great au
thority tell ns that this translation is
not precisely correct: and with their
criticism we should most <d us he Ju
ciiued to agree. For mrel t in the or
dinary sense of the term, Moses was
not. In fact, he showed many signs
of a fiery and impetuous rather than a
gentle disposition. Witness Ins out
break upon the Egyptian; witness his
falling single-handed upon the shep
herds at the well and putting them to
flight: yv it ness his throwing down out
of his hand the two tables of stone in
an agony of grief and rage. Certainly
if meekness implies a certain difficulty
of being roused to fiery indignation,
we can hardly think of Mosss being
. meek. But. it has been observed that
his character would he more truly de
scribed by our word disinterested—the
idea being that he yvus a man who, in
an eminent degree, looked not to his
, ow n honor or profit or advancement,
, but rather to the performance of duty
. and the advantage of the people en.
. trusted to him. All that is told of
him indicates a w ithdrawal of himself,
a preference of the cause of his nation
, to his own interests, which makes him
the most complete example of JeYvish
patriotism. He joins his countrymen
in their degrading servitude; he for
gets himself to avenge their wrongs;
he wishes that all the nation were gift
ed alike; Envies! thou for my sake
When the offer is made that the peo
ple should he destroyed and he himself
become the father of a great nation, he
prays that they may he forgiven. “If
not, blot me. I pray thee, out of thy
hooks which thou hast written." His
, sons were not raised to honor; the
leadership of the people after his death
passed to another tribe. The chosen
people at this period of their history
are not painted in attractive colors. —
It seems obvious that at this time the
Jcyvs Yvere what one would have ex
pet ted them to lx —a horde of selfish,
sinful slaves, greedy and quarrelsome,
: impatient and rebellious, perfectly in
capable of understanding such a char
. acter as that of Moses. It must have
been difficult sometimes for him to
have tolerated the petty natures and
low selfish aims w ith which he was ev
, ervYvhcrc surrounded. To make mat
( ters worse he was often misunderstood
by those w ho ought to have understood
him. Aaron and Miraim resented his
position of superioritv: Korah, Da
j than and Ahiram rebelled against him,
L ami yet his patience seldom or never
failed. Il was his dutv to do so ; nay
I more, it was his pleasure to try and
. lift up the degraded people to a sense
I of their divine mission. It. r
1 t 'aihn p M. .).
A Wonderful Work
A most extensive work is now being
published in China, the giant encyclo
. ptedia, "T’u-shu-tsehi-tsch'eng," com
r prising in 5,02*1 volumes all tlie chief
Yvurks of Chinese literature. The 5,020
; volumes contain 402.204 leaves, each
. leaf has eighteen columns, and each
y column twenty typos or words, giving
I* in all 152,433.11 • words; hut as there
( are many divisions and subdivisions,
. titles, etc, a considerable number of
words must he deducted, but making
all allowances, there still remain more
than a hundred million words. The
work has boon printed under the Gov
| eminent of Kien-luug. but only one
' hundred copies were struck off, of
| which the Imperial Princes, the Minis
| ters of State, ami the officials watching
| the printing got oiu copy each, the
rest Being preserved in the imperial
Lihvavy, Seven more copies were giv
en to the three National libraries and
to four great families, but these were
lost during the Taiping revolution.—
j line copy, printed on white pa\ier, was
j sold, for 8lo.Ouo; another, on bamhoo
. j paper, for >7.500 to a Chinese lirm.
i . '
( j wliii-h is now printing a new edition of
the cvelopM'dia from pholo-lithograph
i* ivprodiietions of the original text.
: and promises to linish the whole work j
within three years. A copy of the new j
I edition w ill sell for >15(I. the suhserip
* j tiou price.
No-18
Brief Sentences from Beecher-
Wo sloop but tho loom of life never
stops, and the pattern which was weav
ing when the sun went down, is weav
ing when it conies up to-morrow.
He who is false to present duty
breaks a thread in the loom, and will
find the flaw when he may have forgot
ten its cause.
Some men are like pyramids which
are verv broad where they touch the
ground, but grow narrower as they
reach the sky.
In this world it is not what we take
up, that makes us rich.
A helping word to one iu trouble is
often like a switch on a railroad track
—but one inch between wreck and
s moot h-roll ing pn >s]ter tv.
A Christianity which will not help
those who are struggling from the bot
tom to the top of society needs another
Christ to die for it.
Success is full of promise till men
get it; and it is a last year's nest, from
which the bird has flown.
We go to the grave of a friend say
ing, “A man is deadbut angels
throng about him saying, “A man is
born."
We ought to love life ; we ought to
desire to live 1 tore so long as God or
dains it ; Imt let us not so encase our
selves in time that we cannot break
the ■crust and begin to throw out.shoots
for the other life.
In the morning we carry the world,
like Atlas; at noon we stop and bend
beneath it, and at night it crushes us
flat to the ground.
Any feeling that takes a man away
from his home is a traitor to thehouse
nold.
It is one of the worst effects of pros
perity to make a man a vortex instead
of a fountain, so that, instead of throw
ing out, he learns only to draw in.
It is not well for a man to pray
cream and live skim milk.
Liberty is the soul's right to breathe,
and when it cannot take a long breath
laws are girdled too tight. Without
liberty a man is a syncope.
The truest self-respect is not to
think of self.
Doctrine is nothing but the skin of
truth set up and stuffed.
Men have different spheres. It is for
some to evolve great moral truths, us
the heavens evolve stars, to guide the
sailor on the sea and the traveler on
the desert: and it is for some, like the
sailor and the traveler, simply to he
guided.
The stream of life forks, and relig
ion is apt to run in one channel and
business in another.
There is always somebody to believe
in any one who is uppermost.
J )eath is the dropping of the flower
that the fruit may swell.
As flowers never put on their best
clothes for Sunday, hut wear their spot
less raiment and exhale their odor ev
ery day. so let your Christian life, free
from stain, ever give forth the frag
grance of the love of God.
Earthquakes.
Some of the most severe earthquakes
on record have taken place in Februa
ry. At Lisbon, on the 26th of Febru
ary. 1521, 1,500 houses were destroyed
by an earthquake and 30,000 persons
buried in the ruins. On the 3d of Feb
ruary, ITO 3, 5,000 lives were lost by
an earthquake at Aquila, iu Italy. On
the sth of February, 1783, a terrible
earthquake took place in Italy and
Sicilv, destroying thousands of lives
and overthrowing Messina and other
towns. On tin- 4th of February, 1701,
an earthquake destroyed the whole
country between Santa Fc and Pana
ma, including Cusco and Quito; it is
estimated that on this occasion, 40,000
people buried in one second. On the
20th of February. 1835, an earthquake
in Chili, besides effecting an immense
amount of other damage, almost de.
stroyed the city of Concepcion, knock
ing dow n ihe Cathedral and most of
the public- buildings.
A ring round the moon is said to be
a sign of rain. And a ring around a
girl's linger is also a sign of reign.
••What is the worst tiling about
riches?” asked a Sunday School super
intendent. And the new boy said :
"Not having any."
We notice in a newspaper some
verses headed "The Seven Ages of
Woman." After a woman is thirty
she abolishes the other six.
It is a mournful commentary on hit
man vanity to see the mourners look
ing hack, on turning a corner, to see if
{ln* procession is worthy of the corpse.
A Harvard professor has made the
calculation that if men were really as
big tts they sometimes feel there would
be room in the Hutted States for only
two professors, three lawyers, two doc
tors. and a ivj>orter on a Philadelphia
| paper. The rest of the world would
I be crowded into the sen and have to
1 swim for it.

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